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Re: Question for Daryl

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  • steelbutcher
    I ve been following this thread with great interest. When the idea of incorporating a piston came up, I remembered a candle powered heat exchanged drive
    Message 1 of 23 , Mar 6, 2009
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      I've been following this thread with great interest. When the idea of incorporating a piston came up, I remembered a candle powered heat exchanged drive mechanism called a "thermal acoustic" engine. This candle powered engine operates on the rapid expansion and contraction of air. Aren't we really trying to do the same thing with water? The link will take you to a YouTube video of this engine.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjjkj-UGboM&feature=related

      Don
      --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, Donald Qualls <silent1@...> wrote:
      >
      > Richard Mundy wrote:
      > > Hi all/Frank,
      > >
      > > I have been having another look at Jeff Bindons machine. Apart from
      > > the transparent diaphragms, he seems to have harnessed some power
      > > from the diaphragm (the nodding bit) which as far as I am aware is
      > > new. I realise the power output is small, but would it be possible to
      > > replace the diaphragm with a spring and a piston?
      >
      > I don't think a piston would work, because the pop-pop action depends on
      > the diaphragm moving freely until it's sharply constrained by tension,
      > but it might be possible to use a small ratchet to drive a flywheel,
      > fan, etc. as long as the reciprocating mass and resistance are small
      > enough not to interfere with the movement of the diaphragm. You might
      > possibly be able to attach a lever to the diaphragm, which would then
      > operate a crankshaft (movement magnified by the leverage, even as the
      > available force is reduced), for something like a fan, either for draft
      > enhancement (to get a hotter flame) or to cool something.
      >
      > > The other intriguing aspect is the devices that look like fob watches
      > > on the outlet tubes, are these for cooling?
      >
      > Took me a while to figure those, too -- they're fuel tanks for the burners.
      >
      > --
      > If, through hard work and perseverance, you finally get what you want,
      > it's probably a sign you weren't dreaming big enough.
      >
      > Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer http://silent1.home.netcom.com
      >
      > Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
      > and don't expect them to be perfect.
      >
    • steelbutcher
      Good morning, I think it is a pop pop engine. Take a look at the link at you ll find in a previous message for another similar engine using a graphite piston.
      Message 2 of 23 , Mar 7, 2009
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        Good morning,

        I think it is a pop pop engine. Take a look at the link at you'll find in a previous message for another similar engine using a graphite piston. I wonder if an engine could be made to resonate using steam? I'm imagining a longer tube might be required to allow for greater piston travel. I like being able to see exactly what's going on during the engine's operation.

        Don in Santa Rosa


        --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "steelbutcher" <N61W160@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've been following this thread with great interest. When the idea of incorporating a piston came up, I remembered a candle powered heat exchanged drive mechanism called a "thermal acoustic" engine. This candle powered engine operates on the rapid expansion and contraction of air. Aren't we really trying to do the same thing with water? The link will take you to a YouTube video of this engine.
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjjkj-UGboM&feature=related
        >
        > Don
        >
      • Donald Qualls
        Actually, thermoacoustic is another name for a lamina flow (*not* laminar flow) Stirling engine -- that s one without a displacer and in which the
        Message 3 of 23 , Mar 7, 2009
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          Actually, "thermoacoustic" is another name for a lamina flow (*not*
          "laminar" flow) Stirling engine -- that's one without a displacer and in
          which the regenerator is "beyond the hot end" rather than inside the
          displacer or between hot and cold. They're called this, I think,
          because the operation is partly based on standing pressure waves inside
          the engine, which are similar to sound waves.

          A pop-pop, running with water, is somewhat similar to a free-piston
          lamina flow Stirling, but there's a phase change inolved (water flashing
          to steam and recondensing) in addition to expansion and contraction of
          air. Still, it's interesting to contemplate if a thermoacoustic engine
          could operate as a direct pump with pipes attached and act like a
          pop-pop in terms of thrust generation...

          steelbutcher wrote:
          > Good morning,
          >
          > I think it is a pop pop engine. Take a look at the link at you'll
          > find in a previous message for another similar engine using a
          > graphite piston. I wonder if an engine could be made to resonate
          > using steam? I'm imagining a longer tube might be required to allow
          > for greater piston travel. I like being able to see exactly what's
          > going on during the engine's operation.
          >
          > Don in Santa Rosa
          >
          >
          > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "steelbutcher"
          > <N61W160@...> wrote:
          >> I've been following this thread with great interest. When the idea
          >> of incorporating a piston came up, I remembered a candle powered
          >> heat exchanged drive mechanism called a "thermal acoustic" engine.
          >> This candle powered engine operates on the rapid expansion and
          >> contraction of air. Aren't we really trying to do the same thing
          >> with water? The link will take you to a YouTube video of this
          >> engine.
          >>
          >> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cjjkj-UGboM&feature=related
          >>
          >> Don
          >>


          --
          If, through hard work and perseverance, you finally get what you want,
          it's probably a sign you weren't dreaming big enough.

          Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer http://silent1.home.netcom.com

          Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
          and don't expect them to be perfect.
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