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USS Monitor

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  • David Halfpenny
    A contemporary photograph of USS Monitor, slightly dented by the rebels, might help someone make a pop-pop. Tony Green s would be perfect. This website
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 5 11:51 AM
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      A contemporary photograph of USS Monitor, slightly dented by the rebels,
      might help someone make a pop-pop. Tony Green's would be perfect.


      This website http://tinyurl.com/9pogyn
      says she made all other navies obsolete overnight.

      Well don't tell the Yankees, but by 1862 the Royal Navy and French Navy has
      sixteen ironclads each ;-)

      David 1/2d
    • Frank McNeill
      Thanks David for the photo of the USS Monitor. Tony Green s pop-pop would be perfect for members who live in the UK, but pretty expensive for members who live
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 5 2:05 PM
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        Thanks David for the photo of the USS Monitor. Tony Green's pop-pop would be perfect for members who live in the UK, but pretty expensive for members who live on the opposite side of the big pond. I hoped somebody might notice that the current home page picture has a sketch of a unit engine that could be made of rectangular brass tubing, and be motivated to build one and find out if it would work. Our photos section has several pictures of the little wooden boat Popflea that Richard Jenkins built. Anybody who takes a close look will see that square tubing was used with a horseshoe bend rather than a coil. Richard reported that Popflea runs on any fuel used for boats with diaphragm boilers. Engines made of rectangular tube engines might outperform engines made of square or round tubing, but nobody will know until one of our experts buys a few bucks worth of rectangular tubing and starts bending it into strange shapes for testing.
        Nobody has commented one way or the other about the suggestion for using rectangular tubing- possibly because most of our members don't comment about anything. Does anybody know if Yahoo has an obituaries column?
      • David Halfpenny
        ... From: Frank McNeill Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2009 10:05 PM To: Subject:
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 5 3:40 PM
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          --------------------------------------------------
          From: "Frank McNeill" <frankmcneilll@...>
          Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2009 10:05 PM
          To: <pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com>
          Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats] Re: USS Monitor

          > Thanks David for the photo of the USS Monitor. Tony Green's pop-pop would
          > be perfect for members who live in the UK, but pretty expensive for
          > members who live on the opposite side of the big pond.

          It can be copied: it's a silent coil type with the legs fixed to one side
          of a round base to give room for a substantial candle or lamp. The legs go
          vertically downwards and take a sharp right angled turn under water.
          There's a perforated wind guard around the coil, and a little chimney sits
          on top of that.


          > Nobody has commented one way or the other about the suggestion for using
          > rectangular tubing-

          Do you need a special bending device to prevent rectangular tubing
          collapsing when bent? David 1/2d
        • Frank McNeill
          The short answer is that there are several ways prevent metal tubing from collapsing when it is bent. 1. Take the tubing to a shop that cuts and bends pipe,
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 5 6:32 PM
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            The short answer is that there are several ways prevent metal tubing from collapsing when it is bent.

            1. Take the tubing to a shop that cuts and bends pipe, tubing, plates, angles, channels, and the like.

            2. Buy a cheap hand tool with matching interchangeable rollers and radius plates.

            3. Fill the tube with something that doesn't compress and remove it after the tube is bent.

            There is a link to a source for metal tubing of all sizes and shapes.
            The source also has bending equipment for tubing, rods, wire, etc.

            --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "David Halfpenny" <dh1@...> wrote:
            >
            > --------------------------------------------------
            > From: "Frank McNeill" <frankmcneilll@...>
            > Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2009 10:05 PM
            > To: <pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com>
            > Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats] Re: USS Monitor
            >
            > > Thanks David for the photo of the USS Monitor. Tony Green's pop-pop would
            > > be perfect for members who live in the UK, but pretty expensive for
            > > members who live on the opposite side of the big pond.
            >
            > It can be copied: it's a silent coil type with the legs fixed to one side
            > of a round base to give room for a substantial candle or lamp. The legs go
            > vertically downwards and take a sharp right angled turn under water.
            > There's a perforated wind guard around the coil, and a little chimney sits
            > on top of that.
            >
            >
            > > Nobody has commented one way or the other about the suggestion for using
            > > rectangular tubing-
            >
            > Do you need a special bending device to prevent rectangular tubing
            > collapsing when bent? David 1/2d
            >
          • Richard Mundy
            Hi all/Frank I agree with all this but copper tube will generally bend more easily than brass. Annealing will often make tube easier to bend as copper&brass
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 6 1:50 PM
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              Hi all/Frank

              I agree with all this but copper tube will generally bend more easily than brass.

              Annealing will often make tube easier to bend as copper&brass work harden.

              Thick walled tube is generally easier to bend without the walls collapsing, than thin.

              Woods metal used to be used to fill tubes prior to bending. Unfortunately can't remember what this was except it was a low melting point metal.

              A coil bending jig can be turned on a screwcutting lathe, most tube benders won't let you bend much more than 90 degrees.

              Dick







              --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Frank McNeill" <frankmcneilll@...> wrote:
              >
              > The short answer is that there are several ways prevent metal tubing from collapsing when it is bent.
              >
              > 1. Take the tubing to a shop that cuts and bends pipe, tubing, plates, angles, channels, and the like.
              >
              > 2. Buy a cheap hand tool with matching interchangeable rollers and radius plates.
              >
              > 3. Fill the tube with something that doesn't compress and remove it after the tube is bent.
              >
              > There is a link to a source for metal tubing of all sizes and shapes.
              > The source also has bending equipment for tubing, rods, wire, etc.
              >
              > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "David Halfpenny" <dh1@> wrote:
              > >
              > > --------------------------------------------------
              > > From: "Frank McNeill" <frankmcneilll@>
              > > Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2009 10:05 PM
              > > To: <pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com>
              > > Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats] Re: USS Monitor
              > >
              > > > Thanks David for the photo of the USS Monitor. Tony Green's pop-pop would
              > > > be perfect for members who live in the UK, but pretty expensive for
              > > > members who live on the opposite side of the big pond.
              > >
              > > It can be copied: it's a silent coil type with the legs fixed to one side
              > > of a round base to give room for a substantial candle or lamp. The legs go
              > > vertically downwards and take a sharp right angled turn under water.
              > > There's a perforated wind guard around the coil, and a little chimney sits
              > > on top of that.
              > >
              > >
              > > > Nobody has commented one way or the other about the suggestion for using
              > > > rectangular tubing-
              > >
              > > Do you need a special bending device to prevent rectangular tubing
              > > collapsing when bent? David 1/2d
              > >
              >
            • David Halfpenny
              ... From: Richard Mundy Sent: Friday, March 06, 2009 9:50 PM ... Cerrobend is a trade name for an alloy that melts out in boiling
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 6 9:00 PM
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                --------------------------------------------------
                From: "Richard Mundy" <coracles18@...>
                Sent: Friday, March 06, 2009 9:50 PM
                >
                > Woods metal used to be used to fill tubes prior to bending. Unfortunately
                > can't remember what this was except it was a low melting point metal.

                "Cerrobend" is a trade name for an alloy that melts out in boiling water.

                If you use solder and melt out with a blow torch, don't breathe the fumes.

                David 1/2d
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