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Re: Slater's Video

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  • Pete B.
    Ditto! We need to talk the manufacturer into making a squattier pop-pop version. Pete How Do Trick Birthday Candles Work? By Anne Marie Helmenstine, Ph.D.
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 5, 2009
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      Ditto! We need to talk the manufacturer into making a squattier "pop-pop" version.

      Pete

      How Do Trick Birthday Candles Work?

      By Anne Marie Helmenstine, Ph.D., About.com

      Question: How Do Trick Birthday Candles Work?

      Answer: Have you ever seen a trick candle? You blow it out and it 'magically' re-lights itself in a few seconds, usually accompanied by a few sparks. The difference between a normal candle and a trick candle is what happens just after you blow it out. When you blow out a normal candle, you will see a thin ribbon of smoke rise up from the wick. This is vaporized paraffin (candle wax). The wick ember you get when you blow out the candle is hot enough to vaporize the paraffin of the candle, but it isn't hot enough to re-ignite it. If you blow across the wick of a normal candle right after you blow it out, you might be able to get it to glow red-hot, but the candle won't burst into flame.

      Trick candles have a material added to the wick that is capable of being ignited by the relatively low temperature of the hot wick ember. When a trick candle is blown out, the wick ember ignites this material, which burns hot enough to ignite the paraffin vapor of the candle. The flame you see in a candle is burning paraffin vapor.

      What substance is added to the wick of a magic candle? It's usually fine flakes of the metal magnesium. It doesn't take too much heat to make magesium ignite (800° F or 430° C), but the magnesium itself burns white-hot and readily ignites the paraffin vapor. When a trick candle is blown out, the burning magnesium particles appear as tiny sparks in the wick. When the 'magic' works, one of these sparks ignites the paraffin vapor and the candle starts to burn normally again. The magnesium in the rest of the wick doesn't burn because the liquid paraffin isolates it from oxygen and keeps it cool.


      --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "David Halfpenny" <dh1@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > --------------------------------------------------
      > From: "steelbutcher" N61W160@...
      > Sent: Thursday, February 05, 2009 9:36 PM
      >
      > >, I found that using the "gag" birthday candles (the ones you
      > > can't blow out) worked very well.
      >
      > Now why didn't I think of that! Brilliant. David 1/2d
      >
    • David Halfpenny
      We can try making our own. Since the magic is in the wick, melting the wax off the wick and casting a new candle, perhaps with multiple trick wicks since they
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 5, 2009
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        We can try making our own.

        Since the magic is in the wick, melting the wax off the wick and casting a
        new candle, perhaps with multiple trick wicks since they are designed for a
        slim candle, is worth trying.

        David

        --------------------------------------------------
        From: "Pete B." <georgeyyy@...>
        Sent: Friday, February 06, 2009 12:07 AM
        To: <pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats] Re: Slater's Video

        > Ditto! We need to talk the manufacturer into making a squattier
        > "pop-pop" version.
        > Pete
        > How Do Trick Birthday Candles Work?
        > By Anne Marie Helmenstine, Ph.D.
        > <http://chemistry.about.com/mbiopage.htm> , About.com
        >
        > Question: How Do Trick Birthday Candles Work?
        >
        > Answer: Have you ever seen a trick candle? You blow it out and it
        > 'magically' re-lights itself in a few seconds, usually accompanied by a
        > few sparks. The difference between a normal candle and a trick candle is
        > what happens just after you blow it out. When you blow out a normal
        > candle, you will see a thin ribbon of smoke rise up from the wick. This
        > is vaporized paraffin (candle wax). The wick ember you get when you blow
        > out the candle is hot enough to vaporize the paraffin of the candle, but
        > it isn't hot enough to re-ignite it. If you blow across the wick of a
        > normal candle right after you blow it out, you might be able to get it
        > to glow red-hot, but the candle won't burst into flame.
        > Trick candles have a material added to the wick that is capable of being
        > ignited by the relatively low temperature of the hot wick ember. When a
        > trick candle is blown out, the wick ember ignites this material, which
        > burns hot enough to ignite the paraffin vapor of the candle. The flame
        > you see in a candle is burning paraffin vapor.
        > What substance is added to the wick of a magic candle? It's usually fine
        > flakes of the metal magnesium
        > <http://chemistry.about.com/library/blmg.htm> . It doesn't take too much
        > heat to make magesium ignite (800° F or 430° C), but the magnesium
        > itself burns white-hot and readily ignites the paraffin vapor. When a
        > trick candle is blown out, the burning magnesium particles appear as
        > tiny sparks in the wick. When the 'magic' works, one of these sparks
        > ignites the paraffin vapor and the candle starts to burn normally again.
        > The magnesium in the rest of the wick doesn't burn because the liquid
        > paraffin isolates it from oxygen and keeps it cool.
        >
        > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "David Halfpenny" <dh1@...>
        > wrote:
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >> --------------------------------------------------
        >> From: "steelbutcher" N61W160@...
        >> Sent: Thursday, February 05, 2009 9:36 PM
        >>
        >> >, I found that using the "gag" birthday candles (the ones you
        >> > can't blow out) worked very well.
        >>
        >> Now why didn't I think of that! Brilliant. David 1/2d
        >>
        >
        >
      • steelbutcher
        I wonder if the answer is to make our own wicks using magnesium filings. We could roll our own magnesium wicks by dipping normal wick material in molten wax
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 5, 2009
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          I wonder if the answer is to make our own wicks using magnesium filings. We could roll our
          own magnesium wicks by dipping normal wick material in molten wax which is saturated
          with fine magnesium filings. Hmm.

          This sort of thing tends to keep me awake all night!

          Regards,
          Don
        • Len Phillips
          Hey you guys/gals .... The aussie is still here but nowhere near as clever as you on the Popp pops so I just watch ... BUT why reinvent the bloody wheel.. if
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 5, 2009
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            Hey you guys/gals .... The aussie is still here but nowhere near as clever
            as you on the Popp pops so I just watch ...

            BUT why reinvent the bloody wheel.. if we have a cheap candle that works
            just use it and get on with it .... I know "clever dicks"

            Have fun
            Pop Pop and sleep well .

            Len ( the aussie )

            -----Original Message-----
            From: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com
            [mailto:pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of steelbutcher
            Sent: Friday, 6 February 2009 11:22 AM
            To: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats] Re: Slater's Video

            I wonder if the answer is to make our own wicks using magnesium filings. We
            could roll our
            own magnesium wicks by dipping normal wick material in molten wax which is
            saturated
            with fine magnesium filings. Hmm.

            This sort of thing tends to keep me awake all night!

            Regards,
            Don



            ------------------------------------

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          • steelbutcher
            Hi Lee, Australia!? Visiting Australia is on my bucket list . I hope you are able to endure the heat for now. I m afraid to ask about the fire situation.
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 5, 2009
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              Hi Lee,

              Australia!? Visiting Australia is on my "bucket list". I hope you are able to endure the heat
              for now. I'm afraid to ask about the fire situation.

              Take care,
              Don
            • Len Phillips
              No fires near me just water ..... Anytime just come and have fun and bring your pop pop ... Len ... From: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 6, 2009
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                No fires near me just water .....

                Anytime just come and have fun and bring your pop pop ...

                Len

                -----Original Message-----
                From: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com
                [mailto:pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of steelbutcher
                Sent: Friday, 6 February 2009 1:27 PM
                To: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats] Re: Slater's Video

                Hi Lee,

                Australia!? Visiting Australia is on my "bucket list". I hope you are able
                to endure the heat
                for now. I'm afraid to ask about the fire situation.

                Take care,
                Don
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