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Re:Hello, I'm new here

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  • John Freeman
    Very nicely done, Ken! Excellent step by step instructions. I must admit that the charming sound of the pop pop in the paper boat got a bit old by the time I
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 23, 2008
      Very nicely done, Ken! Excellent step by step instructions. I must admit
      that the charming sound of the pop pop in the paper boat got a bit old
      by the time I was through with the page, but hey--I can live with that!

      Wonderfully clean work with the aluminum boat too. Thanks for showing us!

      John Freeman
    • Ken Laninga
      Thank you, John. I agree that it would be nice to be able to start and STOP that video but I don t know how to adjust my html. Maybe all one can do is turn
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 23, 2008
        Thank you, John. I agree that it would be nice to be able to start and
        STOP that video but I don't know how to adjust my html. Maybe all one
        can do is turn down the volume. ;-)
      • Slater Harrison
        Ken, I m glad to see you ve done some interesting things with deck modifications with the http://sciencetoymaker.org/ boat design and I appreciate you
        Message 3 of 16 , Mar 24, 2008
          Ken,
           
          I'm glad to see you've done some interesting things with deck modifications with the http://sciencetoymaker.org/ boat design and I appreciate you crediting your starting point.
          One thing I've been doing lately with the engine is making the part of the straw that sticks into the engine longer--more like an inch and a half (36 mm or so) rather than an inch (25 mm). It has a pretty dramatic effect on the speed. I speculate that the straws are feeding droplets of water exactly to the hot spot of the engine. You might try it and see if it makes a difference. If so, you might want to change it on your directions (step 14).
           
          Slater
           


          From: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ken Laninga
          Sent: Saturday, March 22, 2008 4:25 PM
          To: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats] Hello, I'm new here

          Hello, group; after seeing Put-Put Boats on the Discovery Channel recently, I got instantly addicted and have built a "whole fleet" of them so far, moving from the "milk-carton" type to my own design in thin aluminum. Your comments would be much appreciated; here is the Rest of the Story:
          and
           
           
           
          ************ *
          http://www.sticksit e.com/
          blog: http://www.sticksit e.com/blog/
          Ken Laninga: antique
          (prefers to be known as a "Collectible" )
           
           
           

           

        • Ken Laninga
          Nice to hear back from you Slater. You sure got me hooked. One thing scares me about leaving the ends of the straws so long: if they get too close to where the
          Message 4 of 16 , Mar 24, 2008
            Nice to hear back from you Slater. You sure got me hooked. One thing scares me about leaving the ends of the straws so long: if they get too close to where the flame is, the heat inside might be too hot and MELT them. I saw the result of that on one that I tried this with, and then cut it open to see.
             
            Interesting thought though. I'll play with that some more.
             
            Working on my first "V" bottom (paper first) boat right now. Makes me wish my grandkids didn't live so far away!
             
             
            *************
            http://www.sticksite.com/
            blog: http://www.sticksite.com/blog/
            Ken Laninga: antique
            (prefers to be known as a "Collectible")
             
             
             

             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Monday, March 24, 2008 3:55 PM
            Subject: engine modification RE: [pop-pop-steamboats] Hello, I'm new here

            Ken,
             
            I'm glad to see you've done some interesting things with deck modifications with the http://sciencetoyma ker.org/ boat design and I appreciate you crediting your starting point.
            One thing I've been doing lately with the engine is making the part of the straw that sticks into the engine longer--more like an inch and a half (36 mm or so) rather than an inch (25 mm). It has a pretty dramatic effect on the speed. I speculate that the straws are feeding droplets of water exactly to the hot spot of the engine. You might try it and see if it makes a difference. If so, you might want to change it on your directions (step 14).
             
            Slater
             


            From: pop-pop-steamboats@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:pop- pop-steamboats@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Ken Laninga
            Sent: Saturday, March 22, 2008 4:25 PM
            To: pop-pop-steamboats@ yahoogroups. com
            Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats ] Hello, I'm new here

            Hello, group; after seeing Put-Put Boats on the Discovery Channel recently, I got instantly addicted and have built a "whole fleet" of them so far, moving from the "milk-carton" type to my own design in thin aluminum. Your comments would be much appreciated; here is the Rest of the Story:
            and
             
             
             
            ************ *
            http://www.sticksit e.com/
            blog: http://www.sticksit e.com/blog/
            Ken Laninga: antique
            (prefers to be known as a "Collectible" )
             
             
             

             

          • Slater Harrison
            I know what you re saying about the straws melting when going that close to the hot spot, Ken. I deal with it by making sure a thin layer of epoxy coats the
            Message 5 of 16 , Mar 24, 2008
              I know what you're saying about the straws melting when going that close to the hot spot, Ken. I deal with it by making sure a thin layer of epoxy coats the whole part of the straw going in--especially the ends. The epoxy shell--which is more resistant to heat--seems to keep the straws from completely deforming. Too much epoxy will clog and block off the straw ends. Anyhow, it seemed to work well with the last 4 classes of 8th graders who made them. They go visibly faster.
               
              Those aluminum hulls and decks are slick! Gotta try it.
               
              Slater


              From: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ken Laninga
              Sent: Monday, March 24, 2008 6:18 PM
              To: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: engine modification RE: [pop-pop-steamboats] Hello, I'm new here

              Nice to hear back from you Slater. You sure got me hooked. One thing scares me about leaving the ends of the straws so long: if they get too close to where the flame is, the heat inside might be too hot and MELT them. I saw the result of that on one that I tried this with, and then cut it open to see.
               
              Interesting thought though. I'll play with that some more.
               
              Working on my first "V" bottom (paper first) boat right now. Makes me wish my grandkids didn't live so far away!
               
               
              ************ *
              http://www.sticksit e.com/
              blog: http://www.sticksit e.com/blog/
              Ken Laninga: antique
              (prefers to be known as a "Collectible" )
               
               
               

               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Monday, March 24, 2008 3:55 PM
              Subject: engine modification RE: [pop-pop-steamboats ] Hello, I'm new here

              Ken,
               
              I'm glad to see you've done some interesting things with deck modifications with the http://sciencetoyma ker.org/ boat design and I appreciate you crediting your starting point.
              One thing I've been doing lately with the engine is making the part of the straw that sticks into the engine longer--more like an inch and a half (36 mm or so) rather than an inch (25 mm). It has a pretty dramatic effect on the speed. I speculate that the straws are feeding droplets of water exactly to the hot spot of the engine. You might try it and see if it makes a difference. If so, you might want to change it on your directions (step 14).
               
              Slater
               


              From: pop-pop-steamboats@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:pop- pop-steamboats@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Ken Laninga
              Sent: Saturday, March 22, 2008 4:25 PM
              To: pop-pop-steamboats@ yahoogroups. com
              Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats ] Hello, I'm new here

              Hello, group; after seeing Put-Put Boats on the Discovery Channel recently, I got instantly addicted and have built a "whole fleet" of them so far, moving from the "milk-carton" type to my own design in thin aluminum. Your comments would be much appreciated; here is the Rest of the Story:
              and
               
               
               
              ************ *
              http://www.sticksit e.com/
              blog: http://www.sticksit e.com/blog/
              Ken Laninga: antique
              (prefers to be known as a "Collectible" )
               
               
               

               

            • Ken Laninga
              I see what you mean about the epoxy. I ve had bad luck with that LePage epoxy, Slater. Threw the whole thing away without using it at all; the dispenser had me
              Message 6 of 16 , Mar 24, 2008
                I see what you mean about the epoxy. I've had bad luck with that LePage epoxy, Slater. Threw the whole thing away without using it at all; the dispenser had me buffaloed and then it leaked all over. But I sure do like J-B Weld; the KWIK version. I'll make sure to get some of it around the straws when I try that; thanks for sharing the idea.
                 
                If I knew what gauge of aluminum I'm using, I'd mention that but so far, I don't KNOW!! This week I'll go get some more and then find out. While I do prefer the aluminum, I plan to continue making the paper ones too. That sticky metal tape is REALLY good for both boats.
                 
                I find that GORILLA GLUE is good too; I've used it to seal some leaks. But it does dry slowly.
                 
                Wouldn't it be nice to add a wireless remote to move the rudder!!?
                 
                 
                *************
                http://www.sticksite.com/
                blog: http://www.sticksite.com/blog/
                Ken Laninga: antique
                (prefers to be known as a "Collectible")
                 
                 
                 

                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Monday, March 24, 2008 4:38 PM
                Subject: RE: engine modification RE: [pop-pop-steamboats] Hello, I'm new here

                I know what you're saying about the straws melting when going that close to the hot spot, Ken. I deal with it by making sure a thin layer of epoxy coats the whole part of the straw going in--especially the ends. The epoxy shell--which is more resistant to heat--seems to keep the straws from completely deforming. Too much epoxy will clog and block off the straw ends. Anyhow, it seemed to work well with the last 4 classes of 8th graders who made them. They go visibly faster.
                 
                Those aluminum hulls and decks are slick! Gotta try it.
                 
                Slater


                From: pop-pop-steamboats@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:pop- pop-steamboats@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Ken Laninga
                Sent: Monday, March 24, 2008 6:18 PM
                To: pop-pop-steamboats@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: Re: engine modification RE: [pop-pop-steamboats ] Hello, I'm new here

                Nice to hear back from you Slater. You sure got me hooked. One thing scares me about leaving the ends of the straws so long: if they get too close to where the flame is, the heat inside might be too hot and MELT them. I saw the result of that on one that I tried this with, and then cut it open to see.
                 
                Interesting thought though. I'll play with that some more.
                 
                Working on my first "V" bottom (paper first) boat right now. Makes me wish my grandkids didn't live so far away!
                 
                 
                ************ *
                http://www.sticksit e.com/
                blog: http://www.sticksit e.com/blog/
                Ken Laninga: antique
                (prefers to be known as a "Collectible" )
                 
                 
                 

                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Monday, March 24, 2008 3:55 PM
                Subject: engine modification RE: [pop-pop-steamboats ] Hello, I'm new here

                Ken,
                 
                I'm glad to see you've done some interesting things with deck modifications with the http://sciencetoyma ker.org/ boat design and I appreciate you crediting your starting point.
                One thing I've been doing lately with the engine is making the part of the straw that sticks into the engine longer--more like an inch and a half (36 mm or so) rather than an inch (25 mm). It has a pretty dramatic effect on the speed. I speculate that the straws are feeding droplets of water exactly to the hot spot of the engine. You might try it and see if it makes a difference. If so, you might want to change it on your directions (step 14).
                 
                Slater
                 


                From: pop-pop-steamboats@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:pop- pop-steamboats@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Ken Laninga
                Sent: Saturday, March 22, 2008 4:25 PM
                To: pop-pop-steamboats@ yahoogroups. com
                Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats ] Hello, I'm new here

                Hello, group; after seeing Put-Put Boats on the Discovery Channel recently, I got instantly addicted and have built a "whole fleet" of them so far, moving from the "milk-carton" type to my own design in thin aluminum. Your comments would be much appreciated; here is the Rest of the Story:
                and
                 
                 
                 
                ************ *
                http://www.sticksit e.com/
                blog: http://www.sticksit e.com/blog/
                Ken Laninga: antique
                (prefers to be known as a "Collectible" )
                 
                 
                 

                 

              • Donald Qualls
                ... If you can make the rudder bearing smooth enough, you might be able to use the transmitter, receiver, and actuator from one of the tiny R/C cars that are
                Message 7 of 16 , Mar 24, 2008
                  Ken Laninga wrote:
                  >
                  > Wouldn't it be nice to add a wireless remote to move the rudder!!?
                  >

                  If you can make the rudder bearing smooth enough, you might be able to
                  use the transmitter, receiver, and actuator from one of the tiny R/C
                  cars that are sold cheaply (under $20) at Radio Shack and similar
                  locations. They haven't got a lot of power, but a rudder with about 1/3
                  of the area ahead of the pivot will hardly need any power to work.
                  Water isn't good for electronics, but you can probably seal the whole
                  receiver inside a plastic bag and just let it twist the bag a bit where
                  you feed the rudder pivot through (and if you use a zipper bag, you can
                  get into it to change batteries or make adjustments and then reseal it).

                  --
                  If, through hard work and perseverance, you finally get what you want,
                  it's probably a sign you weren't dreaming big enough.

                  Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer http://silent1.home.netcom.com

                  Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
                  and don't expect them to be perfect.
                • Ken Laninga
                  Donald, that sounds like an idea I must follow up on. Many thanks for that tip. I ll check it out asap!
                  Message 8 of 16 , Mar 24, 2008
                    Donald, that sounds like an idea I must follow up on. Many thanks for
                    that tip. I'll check it out asap!
                  • Pete B.
                    Ken, I placed your metal put-put/Pop-pop on our homepage. It should get people s interest going again. It shows what can be done with a little imagination and
                    Message 9 of 16 , Mar 30, 2008
                      Ken,

                      I placed your metal put-put/Pop-pop on our homepage. It should get
                      people's interest going again. It shows what can be done with a
                      little imagination and an existing design. Let us know how uoy do
                      with your rudder control.

                      THX,

                      Pete

                      --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Ken Laninga"
                      <kenstick@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hello, group; after seeing Put-Put Boats on the Discovery Channel
                      recently, I got instantly addicted and have built a "whole fleet" of
                      them so far, moving from the "milk-carton" type to my own design in
                      thin aluminum. Your comments would be much appreciated; here is the
                      Rest of the Story:
                      > http://www.sticksite.com/putputboat/index.html
                      > and
                      > http://www.sticksite.com/putputboat/metal-boat.html
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > *************
                      > http://www.sticksite.com/
                      > blog: http://www.sticksite.com/blog/
                      > Ken Laninga: antique
                      > (prefers to be known as a "Collectible")
                      >
                    • Ken Laninga
                      Fine, Pete. I did find some good aluminum, finally, but am still looking for radio control for the rudder.
                      Message 10 of 16 , Mar 30, 2008
                        Fine, Pete. I did find some good aluminum, finally, but am still
                        looking for radio control for the rudder.
                      • Frank McNeill
                        Hi Ken and all, Trend Times has a catalog at with The Hottest Products For The Coolest People, which include a lot of
                        Message 11 of 16 , Mar 31, 2008
                          Hi Ken and all,

                          Trend Times has a catalog at <http://www.trendtimes.com/index.html>
                          with "The Hottest Products For The Coolest People," which include a
                          lot of small and relatively cheap toy cars, trucks, tanks, planes,
                          helicopters, boats and submarines equipped for either radio, or
                          infrared control.
                          I posted this because of the possibility that some of this stuff could
                          be hacked to provide a remote control system for a pop-pop boat.

                          Best wishes, old Frank


                          --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Ken Laninga"
                          <kenstick@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Fine, Pete. I did find some good aluminum, finally, but am still
                          > looking for radio control for the rudder.
                          >
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