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Re: [political-graveyard] Kennedy Political Opportunism

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  • Lawrence Kestenbaum
    On Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 12:17 PM, Scott Bill Hirst ... I don t know if he could vote for himself, but it wasn t any secret at the time that he had just moved
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 2, 2009
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      On Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 12:17 PM, Scott Bill Hirst
      <scottbillhirst@...> wrote:

      > I recall Bobby Kennedy moved into New York to run against Kenneth Keating in 1964,. Keating the then Republican
      > United States Senator. Bobby was living in McLean, Virginia; I recall, and moved to New York. I recall he could not
      > even vote for himself? I do not know New York law, can anyone confirm that?

      I don't know if he could vote for himself, but it wasn't any secret at
      the time that he had just moved there. Sen. Keating made some kind of
      wry statement welcoming Mr. Kennedy to New York State and suggesting
      some tourist attractions he should visit.

      But New Yorkers voted for RFK. By the time Hillary Clinton did the
      same thing, it was no longer very controversial.

      (I think in New England, and perhaps New York, politics seems to
      organize itself around admiration or dislike for the Kennedy family.
      People out there don't seem to realize how irrelevant the Kennedys are
      to the rest of the country.)

      > Then I believe, young Joe Kennedy moved into his Massachusetts U.S. House district to run, is that correct? He lived outside it,
      > I believe but still in Massachusetts. Then I recall in Rhode Island, Patrick Kennedy was in a State House District that straddled
      > both U.S. House Districts then moved to the part of his local State House District in the U.S. House District he chose to run in?
      > Is this correct?

      I don't know about those specifics. But it is a little known fact
      that members of Congress, and candidates for that matter, are not
      required to live in the district they represent.

      Major party candidates usually have a residence in the district for
      appearance's sake, but small parties don't bother. Some years back,
      one of the socialist parties ran a bunch of Detroiters for all of
      Michigan's congressional seats (most of which don't include any of
      Detroit).

      The same logic, or illogic, does not apply to state legislative seats,
      or city council for that matter. As far as I know, every state
      requires that you be a voter in the district you seek election in.
      (They can't require this for Congress because the qualifications are
      set in the U.S. Constitution.)

      For Political Graveyard purposes, I generally do not presume that
      candidacy in a congressional district demonstrates residence in that
      district, though it does for districts at other levels.

      Larry

      ---
      Lawrence Kestenbaum, kestenbaum@...
      Washtenaw County Clerk & Register of Deeds, http://ewashtenaw.org
      The Political Graveyard, http://politicalgraveyard.com
      Weblog: Polygon, the Dancing Bear, http://potifos.com/polygon
      P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor, MI 48106
    • David McDonald
      Bobby Kennedy could not vote for himself in 1964. The family s NY address was in the UN Plaza, they were neighbors of Johnny Carson and his second (?)
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 2, 2009
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        Bobby Kennedy could not vote for himself in 1964. The family's NY address was in the UN Plaza, they were neighbors of Johnny Carson and his second (?) wife...and Truman Capote.

        Joe Kennedy moved from one part of Allston (suburban Boston) to another in 1986. I lived there at the time, and while there was an effort to make a stink, it obviously didn't work.

        I don't know enough about Patrick Kennedy's circumstance to comment.

        Dave
        _________________________________________________________________
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      • Joe Galu
        Lawrence, Members of the House of Representatives do not have to live in their districts. After all, the Founding Fathers wanted them to represent states and
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 2, 2009
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          Lawrence,

          Members of the House of Representatives do not have to live in their districts. After all, the Founding Fathers wanted them to represent states and reluctantly allowed districts "for the convenince of election."
          Emanuel Celler, D-Brooklyn, said he moved to get back into his district once and lived just outside his district for the rest of his very long tenure.
          Robert F. Kennedy had deep roots in New York State and won big even if he could not vote for himself.

          Joe Galu To: political-graveyard@yahoogroups.comFrom: kestenbaum@...: Fri, 2 Jan 2009 17:13:16 -0500Subject: Re: [political-graveyard] Kennedy Political Opportunism



          On Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 12:17 PM, Scott Bill Hirst<scottbillhirst@...> wrote:> I recall Bobby Kennedy moved into New York to run against Kenneth Keating in 1964,. Keating the then Republican> United States Senator. Bobby was living in McLean, Virginia; I recall, and moved to New York. I recall he could not> even vote for himself? I do not know New York law, can anyone confirm that?I don't know if he could vote for himself, but it wasn't any secret atthe time that he had just moved there. Sen. Keating made some kind ofwry statement welcoming Mr. Kennedy to New York State and suggestingsome tourist attractions he should visit.But New Yorkers voted for RFK. By the time Hillary Clinton did thesame thing, it was no longer very controversial.(I think in New England, and perhaps New York, politics seems toorganize itself around admiration or dislike for the Kennedy family.People out there don't seem to realize how irrelevant the Kennedys areto the rest of the country.)> Then I believe, young Joe Kennedy moved into his Massachusetts U.S. House district to run, is that correct? He lived outside it,> I believe but still in Massachusetts. Then I recall in Rhode Island, Patrick Kennedy was in a State House District that straddled> both U.S. House Districts then moved to the part of his local State House District in the U.S. House District he chose to run in?> Is this correct?I don't know about those specifics. But it is a little known factthat members of Congress, and candidates for that matter, are notrequired to live in the district they represent.Major party candidates usually have a residence in the district forappearance's sake, but small parties don't bother. Some years back,one of the socialist parties ran a bunch of Detroiters for all ofMichigan's congressional seats (most of which don't include any ofDetroit).The same logic, or illogic, does not apply to state legislative seats,or city council for that matter. As far as I know, every staterequires that you be a voter in the district you seek election in.(They can't require this for Congress because the qualifications areset in the U.S. Constitution.)For Political Graveyard purposes, I generally do not presume thatcandidacy in a congressional district demonstrates residence in thatdistrict, though it does for districts at other levels.Larry---Lawrence Kestenbaum, kestenbaum@... County Clerk & Register of Deeds, http://ewashtenaw.orgThe Political Graveyard, http://politicalgraveyard.comWeblog: Polygon, the Dancing Bear, http://potifos.com/polygonP.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor, MI 48106





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        • Joe Galu
          I grow tired of Scott William Hirst s Republican spin. You would think no Republican had ever engaged in anything but the purest of elections. BTW, Claiborne
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 2, 2009
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            I grow tired of Scott William Hirst's Republican spin. You would think no Republican had ever engaged in anything but the purest of elections.

            BTW, Claiborne Pell was nominated in a primary in which he defeated two former governors, both of whom were regarded as very popular. I read that he campaigned in English, Portuguese, Russian, French and some other language.

            Robert F. Kennedy was killed in June. The parties nominated statewide candidates by convention in September, before a primary system was established. Governor Rockefeller did not certify the existence of a vacancy, or kept his lap dog Secretary of State from doing so. As a result, none of our parties in NYS could nominate someone to run in November of 1968, leaving the state with one USSenator. Rockefeller treated the assassination as a political opportunity and named Rep. Charles Goodell who ran and lost in 1970 -- lost to James L. Buckley, who ran on the Conservative Party ticket. The Conservative Party was organized by anti-Rockefeller Republicans and enjoyed their only statewide victory aided by Rockefeller's shenanigans.

            Joe Galu
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          • Scott Bill Hirst
            Hi!  In Connecticut, a Democrat State Representative Jack Malone, I understand lost to a Republican who did not live in the same assembly district. Check out
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 3, 2009
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              Hi!
               In Connecticut, a Democrat State Representative Jack Malone, I understand lost to a Republican who did not live in the same assembly district. Check out The Norwich Bulletin http://www.norwichbulletin.com ,. Kenneth Capalbo lost as an independent in the Rhode Island House, First District, again in 2008; although he lives in the 2ND District.
               The Unites States Constitution only requires so many Representatives per state based on population every census, except every state has to have at least one. The U.S. Constitution does not require districts for U.S. Representatives.
              Regards,
              Scott

              Scott Bill Hirst
              20 Maple Court
              Ashaway,RI 02804-1300 USA
              (401)377-4643
              Note:Telephone if you need quick reply.

              --- On Fri, 1/2/09, Lawrence Kestenbaum <kestenbaum@...> wrote:

              From: Lawrence Kestenbaum <kestenbaum@...>
              Subject: Re: [political-graveyard] Kennedy Political Opportunism
              To: political-graveyard@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Friday, January 2, 2009, 5:13 PM






              On Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 12:17 PM, Scott Bill Hirst
              <scottbillhirst@ yahoo.com> wrote:

              > I recall Bobby Kennedy moved into New York to run against Kenneth Keating in 1964,. Keating the then Republican
              > United States Senator. Bobby was living in McLean, Virginia; I recall, and moved to New York. I recall he could not
              > even vote for himself? I do not know New York law, can anyone confirm that?

              I don't know if he could vote for himself, but it wasn't any secret at
              the time that he had just moved there. Sen. Keating made some kind of
              wry statement welcoming Mr. Kennedy to New York State and suggesting
              some tourist attractions he should visit.

              But New Yorkers voted for RFK. By the time Hillary Clinton did the
              same thing, it was no longer very controversial.

              (I think in New England, and perhaps New York, politics seems to
              organize itself around admiration or dislike for the Kennedy family.
              People out there don't seem to realize how irrelevant the Kennedys are
              to the rest of the country.)

              > Then I believe, young Joe Kennedy moved into his Massachusetts U.S. House district to run, is that correct? He lived outside it,
              > I believe but still in Massachusetts. Then I recall in Rhode Island, Patrick Kennedy was in a State House District that straddled
              > both U.S. House Districts then moved to the part of his local State House District in the U.S. House District he chose to run in?
              > Is this correct?

              I don't know about those specifics. But it is a little known fact
              that members of Congress, and candidates for that matter, are not
              required to live in the district they represent.

              Major party candidates usually have a residence in the district for
              appearance's sake, but small parties don't bother. Some years back,
              one of the socialist parties ran a bunch of Detroiters for all of
              Michigan's congressional seats (most of which don't include any of
              Detroit).

              The same logic, or illogic, does not apply to state legislative seats,
              or city council for that matter. As far as I know, every state
              requires that you be a voter in the district you seek election in.
              (They can't require this for Congress because the qualifications are
              set in the U.S. Constitution. )

              For Political Graveyard purposes, I generally do not presume that
              candidacy in a congressional district demonstrates residence in that
              district, though it does for districts at other levels.

              Larry

              ---
              Lawrence Kestenbaum, kestenbaum@gmail. com
              Washtenaw County Clerk & Register of Deeds, http://ewashtenaw. org
              The Political Graveyard, http://politicalgra veyard.com
              Weblog: Polygon, the Dancing Bear, http://potifos. com/polygon
              P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor, MI 48106














              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Joe Galu
              Scott, Does the Connecticut State Constitution require that its legislators live in their districts? In New York, we have a residency requirement except for
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 3, 2009
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                Scott,

                Does the Connecticut State Constitution require that its legislators live in their districts?

                In New York, we have a residency requirement except for the first election after re-districting. Non-resident winners have one year to move into their districts. That happened to Dave Townsend-R Oneida County who had to move to get back into his district after the 2002 elections. Probably many others that I do not recall or never heard about.

                Also in Conneticut, Tom Dodd, the father of Chris, was from Old Lyme. I believe he never lived in the Hartford-based district when he was in the House. Seemingly, nobody cared.

                In New York's Erie County, there seems to be a quite cosmopolitan attitude. We had a congressman who was a county official and ran in a district where he did not live. Henry Nowak-D won big the first time and every time he ran. The same was true for various other Ds and Rs.

                Joe Galu



                To: political-graveyard@yahoogroups.comFrom: scottbillhirst@...: Sat, 3 Jan 2009 07:32:41 -0800Subject: Re: [political-graveyard] Kennedy Political Opportunism



                Hi! In Connecticut, a Democrat State Representative Jack Malone, I understand lost to a Republican who did not live in the same assembly district. Check out The Norwich Bulletin http://www.norwichbulletin.com ,. Kenneth Capalbo lost as an independent in the Rhode Island House, First District, again in 2008; although he lives in the 2ND District. The Unites States Constitution only requires so many Representatives per state based on population every census, except every state has to have at least one. The U.S. Constitution does not require districts for U.S. Representatives.Regards,ScottScott Bill Hirst20 Maple CourtAshaway,RI 02804-1300 USA(401)377-4643Note:Telephone if you need quick reply.--- On Fri, 1/2/09, Lawrence Kestenbaum <kestenbaum@...> wrote:From: Lawrence Kestenbaum <kestenbaum@...>Subject: Re: [political-graveyard] Kennedy Political OpportunismTo: political-graveyard@yahoogroups.comDate: Friday, January 2, 2009, 5:13 PMOn Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 12:17 PM, Scott Bill Hirst<scottbillhirst@ yahoo.com> wrote:> I recall Bobby Kennedy moved into New York to run against Kenneth Keating in 1964,. Keating the then Republican> United States Senator. Bobby was living in McLean, Virginia; I recall, and moved to New York. I recall he could not> even vote for himself? I do not know New York law, can anyone confirm that?I don't know if he could vote for himself, but it wasn't any secret atthe time that he had just moved there. Sen. Keating made some kind ofwry statement welcoming Mr. Kennedy to New York State and suggestingsome tourist attractions he should visit.But New Yorkers voted for RFK. By the time Hillary Clinton did thesame thing, it was no longer very controversial.(I think in New England, and perhaps New York, politics seems toorganize itself around admiration or dislike for the Kennedy family.People out there don't seem to realize how irrelevant the Kennedys areto the rest of the country.)> Then I believe, young Joe Kennedy moved into his Massachusetts U.S. House district to run, is that correct? He lived outside it,> I believe but still in Massachusetts. Then I recall in Rhode Island, Patrick Kennedy was in a State House District that straddled> both U.S. House Districts then moved to the part of his local State House District in the U.S. House District he chose to run in?> Is this correct?I don't know about those specifics. But it is a little known factthat members of Congress, and candidates for that matter, are notrequired to live in the district they represent.Major party candidates usually have a residence in the district forappearance's sake, but small parties don't bother. Some years back,one of the socialist parties ran a bunch of Detroiters for all ofMichigan's congressional seats (most of which don't include any ofDetroit).The same logic, or illogic, does not apply to state legislative seats,or city council for that matter. As far as I know, every staterequires that you be a voter in the district you seek election in.(They can't require this for Congress because the qualifications areset in the U.S. Constitution. )For Political Graveyard purposes, I generally do not presume thatcandidacy in a congressional district demonstrates residence in thatdistrict, though it does for districts at other levels.Larry---Lawrence Kestenbaum, kestenbaum@gmail. comWashtenaw County Clerk & Register of Deeds, http://ewashtenaw. orgThe Political Graveyard, http://politicalgra veyard.comWeblog: Polygon, the Dancing Bear, http://potifos. com/polygonP.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor, MI 48106[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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              • Ann Frye
                Hi, I think the most blatant example of political opportunism was the Illinois Republican Party importing a columnist from Maryland to run against Barack Obama
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 4, 2009
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                  Hi,

                  I think the most blatant example of political opportunism was the
                  Illinois Republican Party importing a columnist from Maryland to run
                  against Barack Obama in the Senate race four years ago. He took a 3
                  month lease on an address in Chicago. I'm surprised (or am I) no one's
                  mentioned it.

                  Ann
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi!
                  > In Connecticut, a Democrat State Representative Jack Malone, I
                  > understand lost to a Republican who did not live in the same assembly
                  > district. Check out The Norwich Bulletin http://www.norwichbulletin.com
                  > <http://www.norwichbulletin.com> ,. Kenneth Capalbo lost as an
                  > independent in the Rhode Island House, First District, again in 2008;
                  > although he lives in the 2ND District.
                  > The Unites States Constitution only requires so many Representatives
                  > per state based on population every census, except every state has to
                  > have at least one. The U.S. Constitution does not require districts for
                  > U.S. Representatives.
                  > Regards,
                  > Scott
                  >
                  > Scott Bill Hirst
                  > 20 Maple Court
                  > Ashaway,RI 02804-1300 USA
                  > (401)377-4643
                  > Note:Telephone if you need quick reply.
                  >
                  > --- On Fri, 1/2/09, Lawrence Kestenbaum <kestenbaum@...
                  > <mailto:kestenbaum%40gmail.com>> wrote:
                  >
                  > From: Lawrence Kestenbaum <kestenbaum@...
                  > <mailto:kestenbaum%40gmail.com>>
                  > Subject: Re: [political-graveyard] Kennedy Political Opportunism
                  > To: political-graveyard@yahoogroups.com
                  > <mailto:political-graveyard%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > Date: Friday, January 2, 2009, 5:13 PM
                  >
                  > On Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 12:17 PM, Scott Bill Hirst
                  > <scottbillhirst@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                  >
                  > > I recall Bobby Kennedy moved into New York to run against Kenneth
                  > Keating in 1964,. Keating the then Republican
                  > > United States Senator. Bobby was living in McLean, Virginia; I
                  > recall, and moved to New York. I recall he could not
                  > > even vote for himself? I do not know New York law, can anyone confirm
                  > that?
                  >
                  > I don't know if he could vote for himself, but it wasn't any secret at
                  > the time that he had just moved there. Sen. Keating made some kind of
                  > wry statement welcoming Mr. Kennedy to New York State and suggesting
                  > some tourist attractions he should visit.
                  >
                  > But New Yorkers voted for RFK. By the time Hillary Clinton did the
                  > same thing, it was no longer very controversial.
                  >
                  > (I think in New England, and perhaps New York, politics seems to
                  > organize itself around admiration or dislike for the Kennedy family.
                  > People out there don't seem to realize how irrelevant the Kennedys are
                  > to the rest of the country.)
                  >
                  > > Then I believe, young Joe Kennedy moved into his Massachusetts U.S.
                  > House district to run, is that correct? He lived outside it,
                  > > I believe but still in Massachusetts. Then I recall in Rhode Island,
                  > Patrick Kennedy was in a State House District that straddled
                  > > both U.S. House Districts then moved to the part of his local State
                  > House District in the U.S. House District he chose to run in?
                  > > Is this correct?
                  >
                  > I don't know about those specifics. But it is a little known fact
                  > that members of Congress, and candidates for that matter, are not
                  > required to live in the district they represent.
                  >
                  > Major party candidates usually have a residence in the district for
                  > appearance's sake, but small parties don't bother. Some years back,
                  > one of the socialist parties ran a bunch of Detroiters for all of
                  > Michigan's congressional seats (most of which don't include any of
                  > Detroit).
                  >
                  > The same logic, or illogic, does not apply to state legislative seats,
                  > or city council for that matter. As far as I know, every state
                  > requires that you be a voter in the district you seek election in.
                  > (They can't require this for Congress because the qualifications are
                  > set in the U.S. Constitution. )
                  >
                  > For Political Graveyard purposes, I generally do not presume that
                  > candidacy in a congressional district demonstrates residence in that
                  > district, though it does for districts at other levels.
                  >
                  > Larry
                  >
                  > ---
                  > Lawrence Kestenbaum, kestenbaum@gmail. com
                  > Washtenaw County Clerk & Register of Deeds, http://ewashtenaw. org
                  > The Political Graveyard, http://politicalgra veyard.com
                  > Weblog: Polygon, the Dancing Bear, http://potifos. com/polygon
                  > P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor, MI 48106
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                • Scott Bill Hirst
                  Hi!  No party has a monopoly on this but the Kennedy s have done it multiple times. Regards, Scott Scott Bill Hirst 20 Maple Court Ashaway,RI 02804-1300 USA
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 5, 2009
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                    Hi!
                     No party has a monopoly on this but the Kennedy's have done it multiple times.
                    Regards,
                    Scott

                    Scott Bill Hirst
                    20 Maple Court
                    Ashaway,RI 02804-1300 USA
                    (401)377-4643
                    Note:Telephone if you need quick reply.

                    --- On Sun, 1/4/09, Ann Frye <afrye1@...> wrote:

                    From: Ann Frye <afrye1@...>
                    Subject: Re: [political-graveyard] Kennedy Political Opportunism
                    To: political-graveyard@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Sunday, January 4, 2009, 2:42 PM






                    Hi,

                    I think the most blatant example of political opportunism was the
                    Illinois Republican Party importing a columnist from Maryland to run
                    against Barack Obama in the Senate race four years ago. He took a 3
                    month lease on an address in Chicago. I'm surprised (or am I) no one's
                    mentioned it.

                    Ann
                    >
                    >
                    > Hi!
                    > In Connecticut, a Democrat State Representative Jack Malone, I
                    > understand lost to a Republican who did not live in the same assembly
                    > district. Check out The Norwich Bulletin http://www.norwichb ulletin.com
                    > <http://www.norwichb ulletin.com> ,. Kenneth Capalbo lost as an
                    > independent in the Rhode Island House, First District, again in 2008;
                    > although he lives in the 2ND District.
                    > The Unites States Constitution only requires so many Representatives
                    > per state based on population every census, except every state has to
                    > have at least one. The U.S. Constitution does not require districts for
                    > U.S. Representatives.
                    > Regards,
                    > Scott
                    >
                    > Scott Bill Hirst
                    > 20 Maple Court
                    > Ashaway,RI 02804-1300 USA
                    > (401)377-4643
                    > Note:Telephone if you need quick reply.
                    >
                    > --- On Fri, 1/2/09, Lawrence Kestenbaum <kestenbaum@gmail. com
                    > <mailto:kestenbaum% 40gmail.com> > wrote:
                    >
                    > From: Lawrence Kestenbaum <kestenbaum@gmail. com
                    > <mailto:kestenbaum% 40gmail.com> >
                    > Subject: Re: [political-graveyar d] Kennedy Political Opportunism
                    > To: political-graveyard @yahoogroups. com
                    > <mailto:political- graveyard% 40yahoogroups. com>
                    > Date: Friday, January 2, 2009, 5:13 PM
                    >
                    > On Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 12:17 PM, Scott Bill Hirst
                    > <scottbillhirst@ yahoo.com> wrote:
                    >
                    > > I recall Bobby Kennedy moved into New York to run against Kenneth
                    > Keating in 1964,. Keating the then Republican
                    > > United States Senator. Bobby was living in McLean, Virginia; I
                    > recall, and moved to New York. I recall he could not
                    > > even vote for himself? I do not know New York law, can anyone confirm
                    > that?
                    >
                    > I don't know if he could vote for himself, but it wasn't any secret at
                    > the time that he had just moved there. Sen. Keating made some kind of
                    > wry statement welcoming Mr. Kennedy to New York State and suggesting
                    > some tourist attractions he should visit.
                    >
                    > But New Yorkers voted for RFK. By the time Hillary Clinton did the
                    > same thing, it was no longer very controversial.
                    >
                    > (I think in New England, and perhaps New York, politics seems to
                    > organize itself around admiration or dislike for the Kennedy family.
                    > People out there don't seem to realize how irrelevant the Kennedys are
                    > to the rest of the country.)
                    >
                    > > Then I believe, young Joe Kennedy moved into his Massachusetts U.S.
                    > House district to run, is that correct? He lived outside it,
                    > > I believe but still in Massachusetts. Then I recall in Rhode Island,
                    > Patrick Kennedy was in a State House District that straddled
                    > > both U.S. House Districts then moved to the part of his local State
                    > House District in the U.S. House District he chose to run in?
                    > > Is this correct?
                    >
                    > I don't know about those specifics. But it is a little known fact
                    > that members of Congress, and candidates for that matter, are not
                    > required to live in the district they represent.
                    >
                    > Major party candidates usually have a residence in the district for
                    > appearance's sake, but small parties don't bother. Some years back,
                    > one of the socialist parties ran a bunch of Detroiters for all of
                    > Michigan's congressional seats (most of which don't include any of
                    > Detroit).
                    >
                    > The same logic, or illogic, does not apply to state legislative seats,
                    > or city council for that matter. As far as I know, every state
                    > requires that you be a voter in the district you seek election in.
                    > (They can't require this for Congress because the qualifications are
                    > set in the U.S. Constitution. )
                    >
                    > For Political Graveyard purposes, I generally do not presume that
                    > candidacy in a congressional district demonstrates residence in that
                    > district, though it does for districts at other levels.
                    >
                    > Larry
                    >
                    > ---
                    > Lawrence Kestenbaum, kestenbaum@gmail. com
                    > Washtenaw County Clerk & Register of Deeds, http://ewashtenaw. org
                    > The Political Graveyard, http://politicalgra veyard.com
                    > Weblog: Polygon, the Dancing Bear, http://potifos. com/polygon
                    > P.O. Box 2563, Ann Arbor, MI 48106
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >















                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Gene Phillips
                    Former state Rep. Tommy Horne, who spent nearly three decades in the Legislature despite a connection to the infamous civil rights case that inspired the 1998
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jan 6, 2009
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Former state Rep. Tommy Horne, who spent nearly three decades in the Legislature despite a connection to the infamous civil rights case that inspired the 1998 movie Mississippi Burning, has died. He was 72.
                      The Meridian lawmaker served 27 years, off and on, in the Mississippi House beginning in 1972 and ending in 2004, eventually becoming chairman of the Constitution Committee and the Rules Committee.

                      More here:
                      http://www.clarionledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2009901060344
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