Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [political-graveyard] Follow up on the Death of General James S. Jackson

Expand Messages
  • Lawrence Kestenbaum
    ... Many thanks for your help with this! ... Lawrence Kestenbaum, polygon@potifos.com The Political Graveyard, http://politicalgraveyard.com
    Message 1 of 5 , May 19, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      On Wed, 17 May 2000, Michael J. Belgie wrote:

      > The OR-Series 1-Volume XV/1 {S# 22}
      > The Transcript From Phonographic Notes Of The Buell Court Of Inquiry held in
      > Louisville KY January of 1863 shows the testimony of Percival P. Oldershaw ,
      > Captain , assistant adjutant-general to General James S. Jackson at the
      > Battle of Perryville KY
      >
      > Under questioning of General Buell the Captain testified :"....... about 1
      > or a little later- probably half past 1--when we saw the rebel infantry
      > line. I myself was in the front , near General Jackson and when we first saw
      > them they were no more then 90 yards from us in the woods. Previous to
      > seeing them we were firing at long range without seeing the enemy and it was
      > a great surprise to General Jackson and myself as expressed by General
      > Jackson that the enemy was near us . We had time to turn the cannons around
      > a little and fire a few rounds of grapeshot at this short range of not more
      > then 90 yards .
      > Almost in returning the first round of grape General Jackson was felled by a
      > bullet. "
      >
      > Under questioning of General Tyler on the influence of the General's death
      > on his division Captain Oldershaw testified that ".......... I don't think
      > his death had influence on the troops . The troops were all new to him at
      > the time. He was killed earl;y in the engagement , almost with the first
      > shot and was no in a position to be seen by the troops , he was standing at
      > the moment on the left of the battery the troops near him were lying on
      > their bellies ."
      >
      > The General's body was recovered the 9th of October 1862 by Captain
      > Oldershaw and orderlies from the battlefield .
      >
      > The "Buell Commission " was ordered by Edwin Stanton Secretary of War and
      > was conducted by General Halleck in to General Buell's action while in
      > command of the Army of Ohio.
      >
      > Also note that Jackson was one of seven ranking officers killed in the
      > Battle of Perryville KY
      >
      > Respectfully reported
      >
      > Michael J. Belgie Sr.
      > 1st Lt.
      > 28th Reg't Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers
      > Sons of The Veterans Reserve

      Many thanks for your help with this!

      ---
      Lawrence Kestenbaum, polygon@...
      The Political Graveyard, http://politicalgraveyard.com
    • Lawrence Kestenbaum
      I am pleased to report that I received a letter and some copies from the National Railway Historical Society in Philadelphia. They have the national railrway
      Message 2 of 5 , May 22, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        I am pleased to report that I received a letter and some copies from the
        National Railway Historical Society in Philadelphia. They have the
        national railrway guide that was in effect in March 1930, and it's clear
        now that Congressman Glynn died on the C&O train, which was indeed
        scheduled to arrive in Washington at 7:40 am.

        Based on my examination of the schedule, knowing the time of death to be
        6:00 am and that the train was on time, I estimate that he died in the
        vicinity of Brandy Station, Virginia.

        I still have eleven political figures who are coded for "trouble or
        disgrace," but for whom I do not have any text explaining what the problem
        was. In most cases, I have a general idea, but lack specifics as to
        indictment, trial, conviction, censure, impeachment, expulsion, or other
        official action, or resignation under fire or amid scandal, any of which
        would qualify them for the trouble and disgrace page.

        You've probably heard of most of these guys, and know in a vague way about
        their scandals. So do I. What I'm looking for in each case is something
        solid and factual like "convicted in March 1972 of accepting bribes" or
        "expelled from the House of Representatives in 1994".

        The eleven are:

        Albert Michael 'Mike' Espy, secretary of agriculture from 1993.
        Special prosecutor appointed ... tried and found not guilty ...
        specifics?

        David Hall, governor of Oklahoa 1971-75

        Robert L. Leggett, California congressman 1963-79
        Koreagate?

        Joseph R. McCarthy, Wisconsin senator 1947-57
        censured by Senate at some point? I also need some succinct
        and objective words summarizing "McCarthyism" and "the
        McCarthy era".

        Evan Mecham, Arizona governor 1987-88
        forced from office?

        Robert 'Bob' Packwood, Oregon senator 1969-85
        sex scandal?

        Samuel R. Pierce, HUD secretary 1981-89

        Adam Clayton Powell, New York congressman 1945-71
        expelled?

        Dan Rostenkowski, Illinois congressman 1959-95
        criminal conviction?

        Jerry Springer, Cincinnati mayor 1977-78
        scandal involving paying a prostitute with a bad check?

        Harrison Williams, New Jersey senator 1971-82
        Abscam?

        Naturally, I am always interested in hearing about additional folks who
        belong on the trouble-and-disgrace page.

        Two other issues of ambiguity:

        Thomas Francis Meagher, Montana territorial secretery and acting
        territorial governor, and namesake of Meagher County, jumped
        or fell from a steamboat in the Missouri River July 1, 1867
        QUESTION - any better indication of whether this was suicide
        or accident, or should it be left ambiguous?

        Paul Powell, Illinois Secretary of State 1965-70
        When he died, a large quantity of money was found in his apartment.
        When I originally wrote the entry, I took it for granted that the
        money had been embezzled, but apparently there was some issue
        over this. Anything more definitive?

        Many thanks for any help on these questions!

        ---
        Lawrence Kestenbaum, polygon@...
        The Political Graveyard, http://politicalgraveyard.com
      • Gene Baumann
        Edward V. Long, U.S. Senator from Missouri, was the subject of an investigative report in Life Magazine late in his career in the Senate. It dealt with matters
        Message 3 of 5 , May 22, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          Edward V. Long, U.S. Senator from Missouri, was the subject of an
          investigative report in Life Magazine late in his career in the Senate. It
          dealt with matters involving union leaders and money in St. Louis, I think,
          and resulted in his return to the farm. I'll see what I can uncover in my
          own investigative report. It may not have been a national scandal, but was
          pretty big here in Missouri, and Life gave it national scope.


          >From: Lawrence Kestenbaum <polygon@...>
          >Reply-To: political-graveyard@egroups.com
          >To: political-graveyard@...
          >Subject: [political-graveyard] Various questions
          >Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 07:04:48 -0400 (EDT)
          >
          >
          >
          >I am pleased to report that I received a letter and some copies from the
          >National Railway Historical Society in Philadelphia. They have the
          >national railrway guide that was in effect in March 1930, and it's clear
          >now that Congressman Glynn died on the C&O train, which was indeed
          >scheduled to arrive in Washington at 7:40 am.
          >
          >Based on my examination of the schedule, knowing the time of death to be
          >6:00 am and that the train was on time, I estimate that he died in the
          >vicinity of Brandy Station, Virginia.
          >
          >I still have eleven political figures who are coded for "trouble or
          >disgrace," but for whom I do not have any text explaining what the problem
          >was. In most cases, I have a general idea, but lack specifics as to
          >indictment, trial, conviction, censure, impeachment, expulsion, or other
          >official action, or resignation under fire or amid scandal, any of which
          >would qualify them for the trouble and disgrace page.
          >
          >You've probably heard of most of these guys, and know in a vague way about
          >their scandals. So do I. What I'm looking for in each case is something
          >solid and factual like "convicted in March 1972 of accepting bribes" or
          >"expelled from the House of Representatives in 1994".
          >
          >The eleven are:
          >
          > Albert Michael 'Mike' Espy, secretary of agriculture from 1993.
          > Special prosecutor appointed ... tried and found not guilty ...
          > specifics?
          >
          > David Hall, governor of Oklahoa 1971-75
          >
          > Robert L. Leggett, California congressman 1963-79
          > Koreagate?
          >
          > Joseph R. McCarthy, Wisconsin senator 1947-57
          > censured by Senate at some point? I also need some succinct
          > and objective words summarizing "McCarthyism" and "the
          > McCarthy era".
          >
          > Evan Mecham, Arizona governor 1987-88
          > forced from office?
          >
          > Robert 'Bob' Packwood, Oregon senator 1969-85
          > sex scandal?
          >
          > Samuel R. Pierce, HUD secretary 1981-89
          >
          > Adam Clayton Powell, New York congressman 1945-71
          > expelled?
          >
          > Dan Rostenkowski, Illinois congressman 1959-95
          > criminal conviction?
          >
          > Jerry Springer, Cincinnati mayor 1977-78
          > scandal involving paying a prostitute with a bad check?
          >
          > Harrison Williams, New Jersey senator 1971-82
          > Abscam?
          >
          >Naturally, I am always interested in hearing about additional folks who
          >belong on the trouble-and-disgrace page.
          >
          >Two other issues of ambiguity:
          >
          > Thomas Francis Meagher, Montana territorial secretery and acting
          > territorial governor, and namesake of Meagher County, jumped
          > or fell from a steamboat in the Missouri River July 1, 1867
          > QUESTION - any better indication of whether this was suicide
          > or accident, or should it be left ambiguous?
          >
          > Paul Powell, Illinois Secretary of State 1965-70
          > When he died, a large quantity of money was found in his apartment.
          > When I originally wrote the entry, I took it for granted that the
          > money had been embezzled, but apparently there was some issue
          > over this. Anything more definitive?
          >
          >Many thanks for any help on these questions!
          >
          >---
          >Lawrence Kestenbaum, polygon@...
          >The Political Graveyard, http://politicalgraveyard.com
          >

          ________________________________________________________________________
          Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com
        • Lawrence Kestenbaum
          ... I d like to hear more details about this. It doesn t have to be a national scandal to be included. ... Lawrence Kestenbaum, polygon@potifos.com The
          Message 4 of 5 , May 23, 2000
          • 0 Attachment
            On Mon, 22 May 2000, Gene Baumann wrote:

            > Edward V. Long, U.S. Senator from Missouri, was the subject of an
            > investigative report in Life Magazine late in his career in the Senate. It
            > dealt with matters involving union leaders and money in St. Louis, I think,
            > and resulted in his return to the farm. I'll see what I can uncover in my
            > own investigative report. It may not have been a national scandal, but was
            > pretty big here in Missouri, and Life gave it national scope.

            I'd like to hear more details about this. It doesn't have to be a
            national scandal to be included.

            ---
            Lawrence Kestenbaum, polygon@...
            The Political Graveyard, http://politicalgraveyard.com
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.