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Re: Living Off Your Podcast (was Re: [podcasters] Re: Need help locating a podcast hosting provider)

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  • Todd Cochrane
    I know of some comedy podcasts that have 250,000 listeners per show, yet the sponsors will not touch them with a 10ft poll. So yes they have to find other ways
    Message 1 of 17 , Feb 23, 2012
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      I know of some comedy podcasts that have 250,000 listeners per show, yet
      the sponsors will not touch them with a 10ft poll. So yes they have to
      find other ways of making money..


      On 2/23/2012 4:26 AM, tapeleg wrote:
      >
      > Podcasting is certainly MORE relevant to some segments. Take a look at
      > how comedians have seized upon podcasting for building their audiences
      > and getting their names and craft out there. Most comedians aren't
      > making much money off their podcasts, but monitize it with their stand
      > up (or other) shows. Essentially, their podcast is a commercial for
      > their craft.
      >
      > I can't speak to your particular shows, but yes, I can see how that
      > would be frustrating, to see those kinds of numbers. The strength for
      > YouTube is that it's much easier on the consumer (from the ease of
      > consumption to the ease of the concept) while the strength of the
      > podcast is you have a much more dedicated audience than a fly-by
      > audience who watch your video and move on immediately.
      >
      > Leo Laporte made a good point at a blogworld opening address (I think
      > it was blogworld) that the best way to get a larger audience is to
      > grow the entire podcasting audience. We've all experienced the "what's
      > a podcast" question, but we would stare at a person like they were
      > insane if they didn't know what YouTube was.
      >
      > --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com
      > <mailto:podcasters%40yahoogroups.com>, Dan Hughes <danhughesmail@...>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > Question: Is podcasting less relevant now than it was five or ten years
      > > ago?
      > >
      > > I have been doing three different regular podcasts for 3 1/2 years, on
      > > treasure hunting, adult slowpitch softball, and oldtime radio.
      > >
      > > If you google "treasure hunting podcast" I'm the second hit. If you
      > google
      > > "slowpitch softball podcast" I'm the top hit.
      > >
      > > The shows are short (3 to 5 minutes), professional, interesting - people
      > > who listen like them a lot. And I promote each of them on a dozen or
      > more
      > > forums devoted to their topics.
      > >
      > > But the most listeners I've ever had to one of my shows is about
      > 2,500 for
      > > treasure hunting, 1,600 for softball.
      > >
      > > On the other hand, I posted one YouTube video on treasure hunting,
      > and it
      > > has have over 11,000 hits.
      > >
      > > Seems to me that a LOT more people watch YouTube than listen to
      > audio-only
      > > shows. So why do a podcast when you can do a free videocast, and attract
      > > ten times as many people? (My podcasts are a labor of love - I'm a
      > retiree
      > > who was in radio for 40 years, and I miss it tremendously. The podcasts
      > > keep radio up front for me.)
      > >
      > > ---Dan
      > >
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • tapeleg
      And it s always the same sponsors / advertisers every podcast. Audible.com, a few adult stores, and that s about it. Some of the more popular have a unique
      Message 2 of 17 , Feb 23, 2012
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        And it's always the same sponsors / advertisers every podcast. Audible.com, a few adult stores, and that's about it. Some of the more popular have a unique sponsor, like WTF with Marc Maron has a coffee roaster and distributor, but after that, the pickings are slim.

        And yet, most podcast listeners are much more engaged than radio audiences, or TV audiences. It boggles my mind.

        --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, Todd Cochrane <geeknews@...> wrote:
        >
        > I know of some comedy podcasts that have 250,000 listeners per show, yet
        > the sponsors will not touch them with a 10ft poll. So yes they have to
        > find other ways of making money..
        >
        >
        > On 2/23/2012 4:26 AM, tapeleg wrote:
        > >
        > > Podcasting is certainly MORE relevant to some segments. Take a look at
        > > how comedians have seized upon podcasting for building their audiences
        > > and getting their names and craft out there. Most comedians aren't
        > > making much money off their podcasts, but monitize it with their stand
        > > up (or other) shows. Essentially, their podcast is a commercial for
        > > their craft.
        > >
        > > I can't speak to your particular shows, but yes, I can see how that
        > > would be frustrating, to see those kinds of numbers. The strength for
        > > YouTube is that it's much easier on the consumer (from the ease of
        > > consumption to the ease of the concept) while the strength of the
        > > podcast is you have a much more dedicated audience than a fly-by
        > > audience who watch your video and move on immediately.
        > >
        > > Leo Laporte made a good point at a blogworld opening address (I think
        > > it was blogworld) that the best way to get a larger audience is to
        > > grow the entire podcasting audience. We've all experienced the "what's
        > > a podcast" question, but we would stare at a person like they were
        > > insane if they didn't know what YouTube was.
        > >
        > > --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com
        > > <mailto:podcasters%40yahoogroups.com>, Dan Hughes <danhughesmail@>
        > > wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Question: Is podcasting less relevant now than it was five or ten years
        > > > ago?
        > > >
        > > > I have been doing three different regular podcasts for 3 1/2 years, on
        > > > treasure hunting, adult slowpitch softball, and oldtime radio.
        > > >
        > > > If you google "treasure hunting podcast" I'm the second hit. If you
        > > google
        > > > "slowpitch softball podcast" I'm the top hit.
        > > >
        > > > The shows are short (3 to 5 minutes), professional, interesting - people
        > > > who listen like them a lot. And I promote each of them on a dozen or
        > > more
        > > > forums devoted to their topics.
        > > >
        > > > But the most listeners I've ever had to one of my shows is about
        > > 2,500 for
        > > > treasure hunting, 1,600 for softball.
        > > >
        > > > On the other hand, I posted one YouTube video on treasure hunting,
        > > and it
        > > > has have over 11,000 hits.
        > > >
        > > > Seems to me that a LOT more people watch YouTube than listen to
        > > audio-only
        > > > shows. So why do a podcast when you can do a free videocast, and attract
        > > > ten times as many people? (My podcasts are a labor of love - I'm a
        > > retiree
        > > > who was in radio for 40 years, and I miss it tremendously. The podcasts
        > > > keep radio up front for me.)
        > > >
        > > > ---Dan
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Todd Cochrane
        Having sit in front of literally 100 s of media buyers. It boils down to one thing only risk to client reputation comedy shows are very high risk to client
        Message 3 of 17 , Feb 23, 2012
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          Having sit in front of literally 100's of media buyers. It boils down to
          one thing only "risk to client reputation" comedy shows are very high
          risk to client reputation. We live in a politically correct world, where
          what you say even in Jest is held against you and your sponsors. When
          there are literally thousands of ad opportunities. Sponsors will "NEVER"
          risk putting there ads in content that will get them in hot water..

          It is usually someone with an agenda that get a hair up their butt and
          they start a viral campaign against the show and sponsors. You see
          sponsors cutting ties to spokespeople all the time...

          Believe me I wish I could monetize comedy as literally there is 10's of
          millions of dollars of podcast comedy inventory available.

          Todd..

          On 2/23/2012 10:22 AM, tapeleg wrote:
          >
          > And it's always the same sponsors / advertisers every podcast.
          > Audible.com, a few adult stores, and that's about it. Some of the more
          > popular have a unique sponsor, like WTF with Marc Maron has a coffee
          > roaster and distributor, but after that, the pickings are slim.
          >
          > And yet, most podcast listeners are much more engaged than radio
          > audiences, or TV audiences. It boggles my mind.
          >
          > --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:podcasters%40yahoogroups.com>, Todd Cochrane <geeknews@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > I know of some comedy podcasts that have 250,000 listeners per show,
          > yet
          > > the sponsors will not touch them with a 10ft poll. So yes they have to
          > > find other ways of making money..
          > >
          > >
          > > On 2/23/2012 4:26 AM, tapeleg wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Podcasting is certainly MORE relevant to some segments. Take a
          > look at
          > > > how comedians have seized upon podcasting for building their
          > audiences
          > > > and getting their names and craft out there. Most comedians aren't
          > > > making much money off their podcasts, but monitize it with their
          > stand
          > > > up (or other) shows. Essentially, their podcast is a commercial for
          > > > their craft.
          > > >
          > > > I can't speak to your particular shows, but yes, I can see how that
          > > > would be frustrating, to see those kinds of numbers. The strength for
          > > > YouTube is that it's much easier on the consumer (from the ease of
          > > > consumption to the ease of the concept) while the strength of the
          > > > podcast is you have a much more dedicated audience than a fly-by
          > > > audience who watch your video and move on immediately.
          > > >
          > > > Leo Laporte made a good point at a blogworld opening address (I think
          > > > it was blogworld) that the best way to get a larger audience is to
          > > > grow the entire podcasting audience. We've all experienced the
          > "what's
          > > > a podcast" question, but we would stare at a person like they were
          > > > insane if they didn't know what YouTube was.
          > > >
          > > > --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:podcasters%40yahoogroups.com>
          > > > <mailto:podcasters%40yahoogroups.com>, Dan Hughes <danhughesmail@>
          > > > wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > Question: Is podcasting less relevant now than it was five or
          > ten years
          > > > > ago?
          > > > >
          > > > > I have been doing three different regular podcasts for 3 1/2
          > years, on
          > > > > treasure hunting, adult slowpitch softball, and oldtime radio.
          > > > >
          > > > > If you google "treasure hunting podcast" I'm the second hit. If you
          > > > google
          > > > > "slowpitch softball podcast" I'm the top hit.
          > > > >
          > > > > The shows are short (3 to 5 minutes), professional, interesting
          > - people
          > > > > who listen like them a lot. And I promote each of them on a
          > dozen or
          > > > more
          > > > > forums devoted to their topics.
          > > > >
          > > > > But the most listeners I've ever had to one of my shows is about
          > > > 2,500 for
          > > > > treasure hunting, 1,600 for softball.
          > > > >
          > > > > On the other hand, I posted one YouTube video on treasure hunting,
          > > > and it
          > > > > has have over 11,000 hits.
          > > > >
          > > > > Seems to me that a LOT more people watch YouTube than listen to
          > > > audio-only
          > > > > shows. So why do a podcast when you can do a free videocast, and
          > attract
          > > > > ten times as many people? (My podcasts are a labor of love - I'm a
          > > > retiree
          > > > > who was in radio for 40 years, and I miss it tremendously. The
          > podcasts
          > > > > keep radio up front for me.)
          > > > >
          > > > > ---Dan
          > > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
          >


          --
          Todd Cochrane Geek News Central twitter: @geeknews 808.741.4923
        • tapeleg
          I wonder how another big segment, sports talk, fits into that. How does that go over with advertisers.
          Message 4 of 17 , Feb 23, 2012
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            I wonder how another big segment, sports talk, fits into that. How does that go over with advertisers.

            --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, Todd Cochrane <geeknews@...> wrote:
            >
            > Having sit in front of literally 100's of media buyers. It boils down to
            > one thing only "risk to client reputation" comedy shows are very high
            > risk to client reputation. We live in a politically correct world, where
            > what you say even in Jest is held against you and your sponsors. When
            > there are literally thousands of ad opportunities. Sponsors will "NEVER"
            > risk putting there ads in content that will get them in hot water..
            >
            > It is usually someone with an agenda that get a hair up their butt and
            > they start a viral campaign against the show and sponsors. You see
            > sponsors cutting ties to spokespeople all the time...
            >
            > Believe me I wish I could monetize comedy as literally there is 10's of
            > millions of dollars of podcast comedy inventory available.
            >
            > Todd..
            >
          • David Jackson
            Find an affiliate program that fits your audience, use a plugin like prettylinks to make it easy to buy, and go to town. You may not lvie on it, but you ll pay
            Message 5 of 17 , Feb 23, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              Find an affiliate program that fits your audience, use a plugin like
              prettylinks to make it easy to buy, and go to town. You may not lvie on it,
              but you'll pay for hosting, and make a three figure income per month. I
              promote a $5 product, and I make about $2 a sale. I make about 4 sales a
              day. I worked with the company to get a coupon code. I can login and see my
              stats as well as my stats from the plugin. It's better than a poke in the
              eye.

              Dave

              On Thu, Feb 23, 2012 at 5:37 PM, tapeleg
              <tapeleg@...>wrote:

              > **
              >
              >
              > I wonder how another big segment, sports talk, fits into that. How does
              > that go over with advertisers.
              >
              > --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, Todd Cochrane <geeknews@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Having sit in front of literally 100's of media buyers. It boils down to
              > > one thing only "risk to client reputation" comedy shows are very high
              > > risk to client reputation. We live in a politically correct world, where
              > > what you say even in Jest is held against you and your sponsors. When
              > > there are literally thousands of ad opportunities. Sponsors will "NEVER"
              > > risk putting there ads in content that will get them in hot water..
              > >
              > > It is usually someone with an agenda that get a hair up their butt and
              > > they start a viral campaign against the show and sponsors. You see
              > > sponsors cutting ties to spokespeople all the time...
              > >
              > > Believe me I wish I could monetize comedy as literally there is 10's of
              > > millions of dollars of podcast comedy inventory available.
              > >
              > > Todd..
              > >
              >
              >
              >



              --
              Dave Jackson


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Todd Cochrane
              Sports has been a good advertising segment so long as the host are professional.. ... -- Todd Cochrane Geek News Central twitter: @geeknews 808.741.4923
              Message 6 of 17 , Feb 23, 2012
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                Sports has been a good advertising segment so long as the host are
                professional..

                On 2/23/2012 12:37 PM, tapeleg wrote:
                >
                > I wonder how another big segment, sports talk, fits into that. How
                > does that go over with advertisers.
                >
                > --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com
                > <mailto:podcasters%40yahoogroups.com>, Todd Cochrane <geeknews@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > Having sit in front of literally 100's of media buyers. It boils
                > down to
                > > one thing only "risk to client reputation" comedy shows are very high
                > > risk to client reputation. We live in a politically correct world,
                > where
                > > what you say even in Jest is held against you and your sponsors. When
                > > there are literally thousands of ad opportunities. Sponsors will
                > "NEVER"
                > > risk putting there ads in content that will get them in hot water..
                > >
                > > It is usually someone with an agenda that get a hair up their butt and
                > > they start a viral campaign against the show and sponsors. You see
                > > sponsors cutting ties to spokespeople all the time...
                > >
                > > Believe me I wish I could monetize comedy as literally there is 10's of
                > > millions of dollars of podcast comedy inventory available.
                > >
                > > Todd..
                > >
                >
                >


                --
                Todd Cochrane Geek News Central twitter: @geeknews 808.741.4923
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