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Gear for recording in noisy restaurants

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  • Stephen Nelson
    Hello all, I record a podcast in a noisy restaurant. Unfortunately, I can t really switch venues (it s the restaurant across from where my co-host and I work,
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 4, 2012
      Hello all,

      I record a podcast in a noisy restaurant. Unfortunately, I can't really switch venues (it's the restaurant across from where my co-host and I work, and there's no time to record anywhere else).

      I tried, at one point, using the Omnidirectional Powered Stereo Microphone hooked to my Edirol R-09, but there was still too much background sound, so I'm looking into cardioid lavaliers.

      So here's my plan:

      * Zoom H4N
      * 2 Audio-Technica AT831B - Cardioid Lavalier Condenser Microphones

      The AT831B's should hook into the XLR outputs of the H4N, and the fact that they're XLRs could help me re-use them for other purposes (video, hooking up at home into the mixer, etc.)

      This is kind of an expensive rig, though. Am I nuts? (About this, I mean.)
    • Dan Hughes
      Whose voices do you want? Just yours and your partners? If so, you maybe need a couple of shotgun mics with a very tight range. Certainly not omnis! Check
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 4, 2012
        Whose voices do you want? Just yours and your partners? If so, you maybe
        need a couple of shotgun mics with a very tight range. Certainly not
        omnis!

        Check this out:

        http://www.amazon.com/Azden-Barrell-Shotgun-Mic-Outputs/dp/B0000ARKW3

        I've never used these things, so get some confirmation from someone with
        better street creds than me! (I'm not sure if they are as good close up as
        they are for distances).

        But I'd think the cardioid lavaliers you're considering would pick up the
        crowd noise too.

        ---Dan




        On Sat, Feb 4, 2012 at 8:47 PM, Stephen Nelson <stephenenelson@...>wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > Hello all,
        >
        > I record a podcast in a noisy restaurant. Unfortunately, I can't really
        > switch venues (it's the restaurant across from where my co-host and I work,
        > and there's no time to record anywhere else).
        >
        > I tried, at one point, using the Omnidirectional Powered Stereo Microphone
        > hooked to my Edirol R-09, but there was still too much background sound, so
        > I'm looking into cardioid lavaliers.
        >
        > So here's my plan:
        >
        > * Zoom H4N
        > * 2 Audio-Technica AT831B - Cardioid Lavalier Condenser Microphones
        >
        > The AT831B's should hook into the XLR outputs of the H4N, and the fact
        > that they're XLRs could help me re-use them for other purposes (video,
        > hooking up at home into the mixer, etc.)
        >
        > This is kind of an expensive rig, though. Am I nuts? (About this, I mean.)
        >
        >
        >



        --
        Best,

        ---Dan
        http://danhughes.net
        http://danhughesbooks.com
        http://treasuremanual.com
        http://slowpitchbook.com
        http://danhughesautographs.com
        http://thetreasurecorner.com
        http://thesoftballcorner.com
        http://radiofun.info


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • tapeleg
        The problem with lavalier mics is that as soon as you turn your head, it changes the sound of the mic. Also, they tend to be bass heavy and chesty (I love
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 5, 2012
          The problem with lavalier mics is that as soon as you turn your head, it changes the sound of the mic. Also, they tend to be bass heavy and "chesty" (I love the language of audio). In theater, they use lavalier mics, but put the mic on the actor's forehead to keep it close to the mouth and consistently placed relative to the mouth.

          A shotgun mic was mentioned, and it's a good idea. I use Rode NTG1 mics at times, and love them. They aren't cheap, but they are inexpensive for shotguns, and shorter than most.

          Instead of shotguns, you could try dynamic mics, like a Shure PG58, which is about $60, and comes with a mic cable. Dynamic mics don't have the high end that a cardioid mic (including a shotgun) has, and therefor doesn't have as much background noise potential. The downside is that a dynamic takes a little more oomph from your mic preamps. Your results, mic to mic, may vary.

          The H4n is a good piece of kit, but check out the Tascam DR40, which is a little cheaper, and it's mic preamps sound great (for the price). What it doesn't do that the H4n does is act like a USB audio interface. If that isn't important, it's worth your time to check it out.



          --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Nelson <stephenenelson@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello all,
          >
          > I record a podcast in a noisy restaurant. Unfortunately, I can't really switch venues (it's the restaurant across from where my co-host and I work, and there's no time to record anywhere else).
          >
          > I tried, at one point, using the Omnidirectional Powered Stereo Microphone hooked to my Edirol R-09, but there was still too much background sound, so I'm looking into cardioid lavaliers.
          >
          > So here's my plan:
          >
          > * Zoom H4N
          > * 2 Audio-Technica AT831B - Cardioid Lavalier Condenser Microphones
          >
          > The AT831B's should hook into the XLR outputs of the H4N, and the fact that they're XLRs could help me re-use them for other purposes (video, hooking up at home into the mixer, etc.)
          >
          > This is kind of an expensive rig, though. Am I nuts? (About this, I mean.)
          >
        • Martin McKeay
          I ve used the Shure PG-58 mic with a Zoom H4 (not N) for several years now to record interviews at loud security conferences. They do a great job of getting
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 6, 2012
            I've used the Shure PG-58 mic with a Zoom H4 (not N) for several years now
            to record interviews at loud security conferences. They do a great job of
            getting the voice of the person talking without much more than background
            noise from everyone else on the conference floor. You have to keep the mic
            fairly close to your mouth and it helps to get 10 seconds or so of 'noise
            floor' so you can do noise removal afterward. I've done dozens of
            interviews with this equipment and no one's ever complained about the sound
            quality. It might be a little hard if you and your co-hosts are actually
            eating, but generally you can deal with it by using the off switch on the
            mic.

            Martin

            Martin McKeay
            CISSP, recovering QSA
            Network Security Blog and Podcast
            http://www.mckeay.net
            http://netsecpodcast.com
            Twitter: @McKeay
            Cell: 707-495-7926

            "mount -t /coffee /proc/awake /dev/brain" returns "mount : cannot find
            filesystem /dev/brain"

            "If you spend more on coffee than on IT security, then you will
            be hacked. What's more, you deserve to be hacked." - Richard Clarke


            On Sun, Feb 5, 2012 at 9:12 AM, tapeleg <tapeleg@...>wrote:

            > The problem with lavalier mics is that as soon as you turn your head, it
            > changes the sound of the mic. Also, they tend to be bass heavy and
            > "chesty" (I love the language of audio). In theater, they use lavalier
            > mics, but put the mic on the actor's forehead to keep it close to the mouth
            > and consistently placed relative to the mouth.
            >
            > A shotgun mic was mentioned, and it's a good idea. I use Rode NTG1 mics
            > at times, and love them. They aren't cheap, but they are inexpensive for
            > shotguns, and shorter than most.
            >
            > Instead of shotguns, you could try dynamic mics, like a Shure PG58, which
            > is about $60, and comes with a mic cable. Dynamic mics don't have the high
            > end that a cardioid mic (including a shotgun) has, and therefor doesn't
            > have as much background noise potential. The downside is that a dynamic
            > takes a little more oomph from your mic preamps. Your results, mic to mic,
            > may vary.
            >
            > The H4n is a good piece of kit, but check out the Tascam DR40, which is a
            > little cheaper, and it's mic preamps sound great (for the price). What it
            > doesn't do that the H4n does is act like a USB audio interface. If that
            > isn't important, it's worth your time to check it out.
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Nelson <stephenenelson@...>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > Hello all,
            > >
            > > I record a podcast in a noisy restaurant. Unfortunately, I can't really
            > switch venues (it's the restaurant across from where my co-host and I work,
            > and there's no time to record anywhere else).
            > >
            > > I tried, at one point, using the Omnidirectional Powered Stereo
            > Microphone hooked to my Edirol R-09, but there was still too much
            > background sound, so I'm looking into cardioid lavaliers.
            > >
            > > So here's my plan:
            > >
            > > * Zoom H4N
            > > * 2 Audio-Technica AT831B - Cardioid Lavalier Condenser Microphones
            > >
            > > The AT831B's should hook into the XLR outputs of the H4N, and the fact
            > that they're XLRs could help me re-use them for other purposes (video,
            > hooking up at home into the mixer, etc.)
            > >
            > > This is kind of an expensive rig, though. Am I nuts? (About this, I
            > mean.)
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > YahooGroups Podcasters Links
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Patrick McNa...
            ... It might be quieter if you recorded behind the restaurant. Although I haven t tried it, one thing you could do is to get a couple of drink cups, cut out
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 6, 2012
              --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Nelson <stephenenelson@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello all,
              >
              > I record a podcast in a noisy restaurant. Unfortunately, I can't really switch venues (it's the restaurant across from where my co-host and I work, and there's no time to record anywhere else).
              >
              > I tried, at one point, using the Omnidirectional Powered Stereo Microphone hooked to my Edirol R-09, but there was still too much background sound, so I'm looking into cardioid lavaliers.
              >
              > So here's my plan:
              >
              > * Zoom H4N
              > * 2 Audio-Technica AT831B - Cardioid Lavalier Condenser Microphones
              >
              > The AT831B's should hook into the XLR outputs of the H4N, and the fact that they're XLRs could help me re-use them for other purposes (video, hooking up at home into the mixer, etc.)
              >
              > This is kind of an expensive rig, though. Am I nuts? (About this, I mean.)
              >

              It might be quieter if you recorded behind the restaurant.

              Although I haven't tried it, one thing you could do is to get a couple of drink cups, cut out the bottom and push the mics through. That could block a lot of the surrounding noise. Styrofoam should work best. And it would look as if you're just drinking, not podcasting.
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