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home studio setup conundrum

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  • Michael Blaha
    Hi everybody, So here s the deal. I live in a small place and my bedroom also essentially doubles as my office space. In that room, I have a small closet
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 26, 2011
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      Hi everybody,

      So here's the deal. I live in a small place and my bedroom also essentially
      doubles as my office space. In that room, I have a small closet that
      provides about 4x4ft. of standing space, especially once I've cleared the
      floor of the laundry basket, etc. The closet has clothes hanging up to
      allow for the standing room. Even though a wooden dowel is still there,
      it's easy enough to avoid. There is carpet on the floor, an extra bed
      blanket or two on an above shelf, and a pull-string light above. I've also
      acquired a professional quality sound-dampening quilted blanket with
      grommets ready to hang or drape as soon as I figure out the best way to. I
      have my mic stand in the closet and plenty of cable that can go from the mic
      to my computer. In the room, logistically there's not much space to play
      with because of the room's layout and furniture in there, so there are few
      ways that furniture can be arranged to all work together well (considering
      available outlets, etc.). The table that my computer is at and monitor sits
      on is, by default, facing the closet. The back of the monitor faces the
      closet. I've figured that to maximize noise reduction in the closet, I'll
      likely need to close the door anyway while recording.

      As I've been trying to learn Audacity and teach myself recording, it's
      occured to me that I have a challenge in setting levels. Naturally, I'm
      only one person and my own engineer, as it were. I've tinkered around and
      figured I could just start each session with one or two brief practice
      recordings each time I open up the program, then check to see if things look
      okay before recording that time for real.

      Okay... now that I've painted that picture. My main question is the
      following. What are your thoughts on the best way I can be sure, while
      recording from across the room and inside a closet, that I'm getting the
      right and/or best levels for myself each time? Does anyone have any (other)
      suggestions for how I might streamline or just make easier the recording
      process when I'm doing everything myself (as we all essentially do)?

      Hopefully, I haven't profoundly confused any of you out there.

      Thanks. By the way, I love reading everybody's posts on all the audio
      recording related topics. I do learn a lot from them.


      ~ M

      MichaelBlaha1970@...
      (Los Angeles, Southbay)


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dan Hughes
      I sent Michael a private answer that essentially says what I ve said here before, then I thought there might be other newbies in the group who could benefit
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 26, 2011
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        I sent Michael a private answer that essentially says what I've said here
        before, then I thought there might be other newbies in the group who could
        benefit from this idea too (and my apologies to those of you who have
        already seen this too many times):

        http://danhughes.net/podcasting/micbox.htm

        Best,

        ---Dan
        http://danhughes.net
        http://danhughesbooks.com
        http://thetreasurecorner.com
        http://thesoftballcorner.com



        On Tue, Apr 26, 2011 at 4:18 AM, Michael Blaha
        <michaelblaha1970@...>wrote:

        >
        >
        > Hi everybody,
        >
        > So here's the deal. I live in a small place and my bedroom also essentially
        > doubles as my office space. In that room, I have a small closet that
        > provides about 4x4ft. of standing space, especially once I've cleared the
        > floor of the laundry basket, etc. The closet has clothes hanging up to
        > allow for the standing room. Even though a wooden dowel is still there,
        > it's easy enough to avoid. There is carpet on the floor, an extra bed
        > blanket or two on an above shelf, and a pull-string light above. I've also
        > acquired a professional quality sound-dampening quilted blanket with
        > grommets ready to hang or drape as soon as I figure out the best way to. I
        > have my mic stand in the closet and plenty of cable that can go from the
        > mic
        > to my computer. In the room, logistically there's not much space to play
        > with because of the room's layout and furniture in there, so there are few
        > ways that furniture can be arranged to all work together well (considering
        > available outlets, etc.). The table that my computer is at and monitor sits
        > on is, by default, facing the closet. The back of the monitor faces the
        > closet. I've figured that to maximize noise reduction in the closet, I'll
        > likely need to close the door anyway while recording.
        >
        > As I've been trying to learn Audacity and teach myself recording, it's
        > occured to me that I have a challenge in setting levels. Naturally, I'm
        > only one person and my own engineer, as it were. I've tinkered around and
        > figured I could just start each session with one or two brief practice
        > recordings each time I open up the program, then check to see if things
        > look
        > okay before recording that time for real.
        >
        > Okay... now that I've painted that picture. My main question is the
        > following. What are your thoughts on the best way I can be sure, while
        > recording from across the room and inside a closet, that I'm getting the
        > right and/or best levels for myself each time? Does anyone have any (other)
        > suggestions for how I might streamline or just make easier the recording
        > process when I'm doing everything myself (as we all essentially do)?
        >
        > Hopefully, I haven't profoundly confused any of you out there.
        >
        > Thanks. By the way, I love reading everybody's posts on all the audio
        > recording related topics. I do learn a lot from them.
        >
        > ~ M
        >
        > MichaelBlaha1970@...
        > (Los Angeles, Southbay)
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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