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Help In Interpreting Podcast Stats

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  • Reggie_six
    Folks I am having a problem interpreting some stats about my podcast as collected by Awstats and Podpress and I hope some of the more experienced people in
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 19, 2010
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      Folks

      I am having a problem interpreting some stats about my podcast as collected by Awstats and Podpress and I hope some of the more experienced people in this group can help me out.

      Specifically, I produce a podcast on topics related to C S Lewis and his books. They are in English and come out roughly once every 4 weeks. For some reason one of my episodes will "surge" in the stats, almost doubling the hits for the previous podcast. In addition, I see to be getting a lot of traffic from mainland China, which is sort of unusual given the topic and the language of my shows.

      Looking in more detail, I see a lot of feeds or web plays of my podcasts from 123.125.67.2424, with many "duplicate" hits (same audio file). Curiously many of them seem to report a download of zero bytes in Awstats, although they point to the correct audio file. Here is a sample - note the difference in the Size in Bytes.

      Does anyone have an idea what is going on? (Yes, I know I should switch to something like PowerPress, but....)

      Thanks
      R D Gates
      ----------------------------------------------------------------



      /podpress_trac/web/272/0/CSL-2010-01-03.mp3
      Http Code: 200 Date: Sep 19 14:18:32 Http Version: HTTP/1.0 Size in Bytes: 49000
      Referer: -
      Agent: NSPlayer/10.0.0.4072 WMFSDK/10.0


      /podpress_trac/web/297/0/CSL-2010-02-18.mp3
      Http Code: 200 Date: Sep 19 14:19:52 Http Version: HTTP/1.0 Size in Bytes: 0
      Referer: -
      Agent: NSPlayer/10.0.0.4072 WMFSDK/10.0
    • angelomandato
      We ran into this issue early on when we developed the Blubrry Statistics system back in 2006. In these situations we discovered that PodPress typically had
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 21, 2010
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        We ran into this issue early on when we developed the Blubrry Statistics
        system back in 2006. In these situations we discovered that PodPress
        typically had inflated statistics because it went by request, not IP
        address. The only time PodPress was accurate was when you used the Full+
        option, which adds a lot of server processing which, for even a small
        podcast, can cause your web site to come to a crawl when enabled.

        Awstats does not analyze media file specific downloads, it simply takes
        a web traffic approach. 5 downloads of a png image doesn't mean you had
        5 unique users look at that png image. As far as web traffic is
        concerned, AWStats rocks, but for media downloads, it comes up short.

        Looking up the IP 123.125.67.24 on a site such as ip-lookup.net, you
        will confirm that it resolves to a network in China. So if this IP is in
        your web logs often, your statistics will be inflated as you noted.
        Media downloads from China are typically inflated due to the
        Government's firewall.

        When you see reporting of zero bytes, we should presume this is for GET
        requests. There is another type of request called a HEAD request, which
        will always report zero bytes. I presume these are GET requests,
        requests that intended to download the file (GET) vs requests to just
        get the file information (HEAD). PodPress should not be counting HEAD
        requests. A GET request with zero bytes is typically an indication that
        something stopped the file transfer abruptly. This is typically the work
        of a network firewall.

        When we first investigated this paradigm, it was for an IP address to a
        corporate network. When we contacted the administrator of that network,
        we found the corporation had a firewall in place that prevented the
        download of media for most of their employees. The result is that the
        request would start, but the data returning from the server was then
        blocked when it was detected as media. The country of China also has a
        firewall which can block media content in the same fashion.

        This is a good example why you should use a media statistics service
        such as our Blubrry Media Statistics
        (http://www.blubrry.com/podcast_statistics/
        <http://www.blubrry.com/podcast_statistics/> ) to get an accurate
        measurement of your media downloads.

        Blubrry Statistics will give you a breakdown of the countries as well as
        clients and platforms with an overall view of your distribution between
        podcatchers, browsers, mobile browsers, mobile applications and TV
        hardware based on the IP address. We have a number of algorithms in
        place to adjust for networks where multiple computers share one IP
        address as well as filtering out web bots and crawlers. The Free/basic
        statistics service limits the reports to the top 10 of each category,
        our paid/premium statistics service gives you complete details as well
        as U.S. state by state break down. Most podcasters use our free service,
        but if you ever needed the details it's only $5/month.

        If you are using PodPress, you can use our free Blubrry Statistics
        service by adding one value to your PodPress settings. Instructions are
        available when you sign up for statistics at Blubrry.com. If you are
        using our Blubrry PowerPress WordPress plugin (available for free at
        http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/powerpress/
        <http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/powerpress/> ), our statistics
        service can be accessed from your WordPress dashboard, giving you a
        summary view of your latest media downloads. If you are not familiar,
        our PowerPress WordPress plugin is designed to be an upgrade to
        PodPress. Switching from PodPress to PowerPress is easy, and there is an
        option to view all of your old PodPress statistics data from PowerPress.

        This stuff can get complicated quickly. If you do use any of our Blubrry
        services and have any problems, please contact us so we can get you
        setup: http://www.blubrry.com/contact.php
        <http://www.blubrry.com/contact.php>

        --angelo

        --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, "Reggie_six" <rdgates@...> wrote:
        >
        > Folks
        >
        > I am having a problem interpreting some stats about my podcast as
        collected by Awstats and Podpress and I hope some of the more
        experienced people in this group can help me out.
        >
        > Specifically, I produce a podcast on topics related to C S Lewis and
        his books. They are in English and come out roughly once every 4 weeks.
        For some reason one of my episodes will "surge" in the stats, almost
        doubling the hits for the previous podcast. In addition, I see to be
        getting a lot of traffic from mainland China, which is sort of unusual
        given the topic and the language of my shows.
        >
        > Looking in more detail, I see a lot of feeds or web plays of my
        podcasts from 123.125.67.2424, with many "duplicate" hits (same audio
        file). Curiously many of them seem to report a download of zero bytes in
        Awstats, although they point to the correct audio file. Here is a
        sample - note the difference in the Size in Bytes.
        >
        > Does anyone have an idea what is going on? (Yes, I know I should
        switch to something like PowerPress, but....)
        >
        > Thanks
        > R D Gates
        > ----------------------------------------------------------------
        >
        >
        >
        > /podpress_trac/web/272/0/CSL-2010-01-03.mp3
        > Http Code: 200 Date: Sep 19 14:18:32 Http Version: HTTP/1.0 Size
        in Bytes: 49000
        > Referer: -
        > Agent: NSPlayer/10.0.0.4072 WMFSDK/10.0
        >
        >
        > /podpress_trac/web/297/0/CSL-2010-02-18.mp3
        > Http Code: 200 Date: Sep 19 14:19:52 Http Version: HTTP/1.0 Size
        in Bytes: 0
        > Referer: -
        > Agent: NSPlayer/10.0.0.4072 WMFSDK/10.0
        >



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