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Torrents

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  • tim
    GET U torrent, when the window comes up hit the little magic wand icon top left. browse for the file you want to send... make sure its in a document
    Message 1 of 17 , May 27, 2010
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      GET U torrent, when the window comes up hit the little
      magic wand icon top left.
      browse for the file you want to send... make sure its in a document where
      you want to leave it, dont move it later cos the torrent wont be able to find it !

      fill in the details and u torrent will put the little green torrent in your documents.
      that is like the exact address of your file.

      Go to say pirate bay and upload the torrent there
      again, put the little torrent in a file where you want to keep it,
      dont move it or you will mess things up.

      You need to paste a few trackers into the U torrent form
      prob get them on the U torrent forum .

      when you up load to pirate bay you put a description
      of the file in there, you can also put a few links in too if
      you wish, or link to a photo...

      To: podcasters@yahoogroups.com
      From: bob@...
      Date: Thu, 27 May 2010 09:40:33 -0400
      Subject: [podcasters] Re:Torrents




























      This is a fascinating discussion; I never even thought about distributing Mr. Media Radio files through torrents. Can anyone offer some how-to advice and where-to?



      Thanks!



      Bob Andelman

      Host/Producer/Writer

      Mr. Media Radio

      http://www.mrmedia.com

      727-458-6475

      --------------

      bob@...

      Books by Bob Andelman: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B0027NOD1K



      Skype: bobandelman

      LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/bobandelman

      Twitter: http://twitter.com/andelman

      Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Mr-Media-Interviews-by-Bob-Andelman/10847855738





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















      _________________________________________________________________
      http://clk.atdmt.com/UKM/go/195013117/direct/01/


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Stephen Eley
      ... It s only useful if enough listeners look for and download podcasts via BitTorrent to make it worth the extra work. This list probably has a greater
      Message 2 of 17 , May 27, 2010
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        On Thu, May 27, 2010 at 10:25 AM, andrew clarke <mail@...> wrote:
        >
        > For very popular podcasts with a lot of listeners BitTorrent may
        > still be useful, but the more popular podcasts probably have sponsors
        > or encourage listener donations via PayPal, etc.

        It's only useful if enough listeners look for and download podcasts
        via BitTorrent to make it worth the extra work. This list probably
        has a greater concentration of podcast enthusiasts than you're likely
        to find anywhere else. Straw poll: does *anyone* here use BitTorrent
        to download podcasts on a regular basis?

        Practically speaking, no one does. Most people wouldn't even if they
        knew about the option. The problem is that it's extra hassle for the
        consumer -- even if podcatchers all supported it, et cetera, there are
        random issues with home routers and firewalls and ISPs and flaky
        trackers and upload bandwidth saturation. BitTorrent's a great
        technology when it works, but there are plenty of reasons why it
        doesn't a lot of the time, and troubleshooting those glitches is
        beyond most people's technical knowledge or patience.

        And if you do get it working, unless there are a fair number of seeds
        out there at that moment (say, more than 10), it's usually *slower* to
        download than just doing a regular Web download from a regular host.
        And even a successful podcast is unlikely to have guaranteed seeds for
        a back episode.

        That's why I don't download podcasts with BT, and why I don't
        distribute episodes with it. I *am* a frequent BitTorrent user, and
        I've known that you *could* grab some podcasts with it since 2006,
        when Dave Slusher started trying to get everyone to do it. But it's
        extra work for poor performance. As a podcast consumer, it's just not
        a rational choice.


        > One use for BitTorrent that may be worthwhile is for distributing
        > archives of old podcasts.  Note though that a particular torrent must
        > have a fixed size, which means you probably either have to have a
        > static archive, or one torrent per podcast.

        FWIW, I have done this before. I've put up archive collections via
        BitTorrent before, and various EP listeners have done it as well.
        (One of the benefits of Creative Commons licensing: other people can
        help you with things like this.) >8-> It wasn't really a failure in
        the sense I was describing above -- it worked fine, and got at least
        *some* full transfers because I saw a few seeds on it -- but keeping
        the collections up-to-date was a different sort of hassle and I
        quickly forgot about it.


        --
        Have Fun,
        Steve Eley (sfeley@...)
        ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
        http://www.escapepod.org
      • andrew clarke
        ... EDIT: ... the more popular podcasts probably have sponsors or encourage listener donations via PayPal, etc., so can afford to pay for web hosting instead
        Message 3 of 17 , May 27, 2010
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          On Fri 2010-05-28 00:25:29 UTC+1000, andrew clarke (mail@...) wrote:

          > For very popular podcasts with a lot of listeners BitTorrent may
          > still be useful, but the more popular podcasts probably have sponsors
          > or encourage listener donations via PayPal, etc.

          EDIT:

          ... the more popular podcasts probably have sponsors or encourage
          listener donations via PayPal, etc., so can afford to pay for web
          hosting instead of resorting to BitTorrent.
        • crafterlag
          It s kind of a shame that the home-networking end of torrenting is such a pain in the butt, because you can totally subscribe to torrent RSSs and get files
          Message 4 of 17 , May 27, 2010
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            It's kind of a shame that the home-networking end of torrenting is such a pain in the butt, because you can totally subscribe to torrent RSSs and get files that way. It would be no less inconvenient than subscribing with a podcatcher, otherwise.

            I torrent all the time and I never bother with torrented podcasts, either. Torrents are great for really huge or obscure stuff, but given the choice, I choose a direct download.

            -Mer
            Braindouche.net
            hotgluemedia.com
            and other stuff too

            --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Eley <SFEley@...> wrote:
            >
            > On Thu, May 27, 2010 at 10:25 AM, andrew clarke <mail@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > For very popular podcasts with a lot of listeners BitTorrent may
            > > still be useful, but the more popular podcasts probably have sponsors
            > > or encourage listener donations via PayPal, etc.
            >
            > It's only useful if enough listeners look for and download podcasts
            > via BitTorrent to make it worth the extra work. This list probably
            > has a greater concentration of podcast enthusiasts than you're likely
            > to find anywhere else. Straw poll: does *anyone* here use BitTorrent
            > to download podcasts on a regular basis?
            >
            > Practically speaking, no one does. Most people wouldn't even if they
            > knew about the option. The problem is that it's extra hassle for the
            > consumer -- even if podcatchers all supported it, et cetera, there are
            > random issues with home routers and firewalls and ISPs and flaky
            > trackers and upload bandwidth saturation. BitTorrent's a great
            > technology when it works, but there are plenty of reasons why it
            > doesn't a lot of the time, and troubleshooting those glitches is
            > beyond most people's technical knowledge or patience.
            >
            > And if you do get it working, unless there are a fair number of seeds
            > out there at that moment (say, more than 10), it's usually *slower* to
            > download than just doing a regular Web download from a regular host.
            > And even a successful podcast is unlikely to have guaranteed seeds for
            > a back episode.
            >
            > That's why I don't download podcasts with BT, and why I don't
            > distribute episodes with it. I *am* a frequent BitTorrent user, and
            > I've known that you *could* grab some podcasts with it since 2006,
            > when Dave Slusher started trying to get everyone to do it. But it's
            > extra work for poor performance. As a podcast consumer, it's just not
            > a rational choice.
            >
            >
            > > One use for BitTorrent that may be worthwhile is for distributing
            > > archives of old podcasts.  Note though that a particular torrent must
            > > have a fixed size, which means you probably either have to have a
            > > static archive, or one torrent per podcast.
            >
            > FWIW, I have done this before. I've put up archive collections via
            > BitTorrent before, and various EP listeners have done it as well.
            > (One of the benefits of Creative Commons licensing: other people can
            > help you with things like this.) >8-> It wasn't really a failure in
            > the sense I was describing above -- it worked fine, and got at least
            > *some* full transfers because I saw a few seeds on it -- but keeping
            > the collections up-to-date was a different sort of hassle and I
            > quickly forgot about it.
            >
            >
            > --
            > Have Fun,
            > Steve Eley (sfeley@...)
            > ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
            > http://www.escapepod.org
            >
          • Stephen Eley
            ... The baseline Libsyn account is still $5 per month. If that s too much money, there s always Archive.org. (Download speeds are sporadic there, but it s
            Message 5 of 17 , May 27, 2010
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              On Thu, May 27, 2010 at 1:32 PM, andrew clarke <mail@...> wrote:
              >
              > ... the more popular podcasts probably have sponsors or encourage
              > listener donations via PayPal, etc., so can afford to pay for web
              > hosting instead of resorting to BitTorrent.

              The baseline Libsyn account is still $5 per month. If that's too much
              money, there's always Archive.org. (Download speeds are sporadic
              there, but it's still free.)

              And don't forget: less popular podcasts are likely to do *worse* with
              BitTorrent. If nobody's seeding your content, it doesn't matter how
              many places you have the .torrent file posted.

              --
              Have Fun,
              Steve Eley (sfeley@...)
              ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
              http://www.escapepod.org
            • tim
              I disagree, I think torrents are easy and no problem, There have been 100s of downloads from files Ive put up there The prob is that people are selfish,
              Message 6 of 17 , May 27, 2010
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                I disagree, I think torrents are easy and no problem, There have been 100s of downloads from
                files Ive put up there
                The prob is that people are selfish,
                they get the file downloaded to their hard drive and then deletethe torrent off
                their u torrent page, instead of leaving it there, and the downloaded file in
                place so others on the web can download from him and others.

                So if you upload a file, its vital that you leave the file in situ in your documents
                and the torrent on your u torrent page, then there is always at least one seeder to
                the file out in cyber space.

                I have files up there for 6 months that still have 3 or 4 seeders, but lots of
                others where I am the only seeder,

                But I like the feedback of knowing the exact No. of downloads to my stuff,
                so rapidshare is useful for that and just posting a link up to torrent cyber space
                does that.

                Some of my torrented files have hit 800 and 900 downloads.

                To: podcasters@yahoogroups.com
                From: SFEley@...
                Date: Thu, 27 May 2010 13:23:33 -0400
                Subject: Re: [podcasters] Torrents




























                On Thu, May 27, 2010 at 10:25 AM, andrew clarke <mail@...> wrote:

                >

                > For very popular podcasts with a lot of listeners BitTorrent may

                > still be useful, but the more popular podcasts probably have sponsors

                > or encourage listener donations via PayPal, etc.



                It's only useful if enough listeners look for and download podcasts

                via BitTorrent to make it worth the extra work. This list probably

                has a greater concentration of podcast enthusiasts than you're likely

                to find anywhere else. Straw poll: does *anyone* here use BitTorrent

                to download podcasts on a regular basis?



                Practically speaking, no one does. Most people wouldn't even if they

                knew about the option. The problem is that it's extra hassle for the

                consumer -- even if podcatchers all supported it, et cetera, there are

                random issues with home routers and firewalls and ISPs and flaky

                trackers and upload bandwidth saturation. BitTorrent's a great

                technology when it works, but there are plenty of reasons why it

                doesn't a lot of the time, and troubleshooting those glitches is

                beyond most people's technical knowledge or patience.



                And if you do get it working, unless there are a fair number of seeds

                out there at that moment (say, more than 10), it's usually *slower* to

                download than just doing a regular Web download from a regular host.

                And even a successful podcast is unlikely to have guaranteed seeds for

                a back episode.



                That's why I don't download podcasts with BT, and why I don't

                distribute episodes with it. I *am* a frequent BitTorrent user, and

                I've known that you *could* grab some podcasts with it since 2006,

                when Dave Slusher started trying to get everyone to do it. But it's

                extra work for poor performance. As a podcast consumer, it's just not

                a rational choice.



                > One use for BitTorrent that may be worthwhile is for distributing

                > archives of old podcasts. Note though that a particular torrent must

                > have a fixed size, which means you probably either have to have a

                > static archive, or one torrent per podcast.



                FWIW, I have done this before. I've put up archive collections via

                BitTorrent before, and various EP listeners have done it as well.

                (One of the benefits of Creative Commons licensing: other people can

                help you with things like this.) >8-> It wasn't really a failure in

                the sense I was describing above -- it worked fine, and got at least

                *some* full transfers because I saw a few seeds on it -- but keeping

                the collections up-to-date was a different sort of hassle and I

                quickly forgot about it.



                --

                Have Fun,

                Steve Eley (sfeley@...)

                ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine

                http://www.escapepod.org
















                _________________________________________________________________
                http://clk.atdmt.com/UKM/go/197222280/direct/01/
                Do you have a story that started on Hotmail? Tell us now

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Stephen Eley
                ... Right. When available, it s the more rational decision for the consumer. That it might cost you the producer a fraction of a cent in bandwidth is
                Message 7 of 17 , May 27, 2010
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                  On Thu, May 27, 2010 at 1:37 PM, crafterlag <braindouche@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I torrent all the time and I never bother with torrented podcasts, either. Torrents are great for really huge or obscure stuff, but given the choice, I choose a direct download.

                  Right. When available, it's the more rational decision for the consumer.

                  That it might cost you the producer a fraction of a cent in bandwidth
                  is immaterial to the consumer. If they're going to give of themselves
                  to do you a favor, it's more rational for them to PayPal you a buck or
                  more.


                  --
                  Have Fun,
                  Steve Eley (sfeley@...)
                  ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
                  http://www.escapepod.org
                • Stephen Eley
                  ... How do you intend to solve that problem? -- Have Fun, Steve Eley (sfeley@gmail.com) ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
                  Message 8 of 17 , May 27, 2010
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                    On Thu, May 27, 2010 at 1:40 PM, tim <lovetoloveyou@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > The prob is that people are selfish,

                    How do you intend to solve that problem?

                    --
                    Have Fun,
                    Steve Eley (sfeley@...)
                    ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
                    http://www.escapepod.org
                  • thesoundofyoungamerica
                    ... I did the same with old episodes of The Sound of Young America. They eventually stopped seeding (I wasn t seeding them), but it was a relatively
                    Message 9 of 17 , May 27, 2010
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                      --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Eley <SFEley@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > On Thu, May 27, 2010 at 10:25 AM, andrew clarke <mail@...> wrote:
                      > > One use for BitTorrent that may be worthwhile is for distributing
                      > > archives of old podcasts.  Note though that a particular torrent must
                      > > have a fixed size, which means you probably either have to have a
                      > > static archive, or one torrent per podcast.
                      >
                      > FWIW, I have done this before. I've put up archive collections via
                      > BitTorrent before, and various EP listeners have done it as well.
                      > (One of the benefits of Creative Commons licensing: other people can
                      > help you with things like this.) >8-> It wasn't really a failure in
                      > the sense I was describing above -- it worked fine, and got at least
                      > *some* full transfers because I saw a few seeds on it -- but keeping
                      > the collections up-to-date was a different sort of hassle and I
                      > quickly forgot about it.

                      I did the same with old episodes of The Sound of Young America. They eventually stopped seeding (I wasn't seeding them), but it was a relatively convenient way for people to get a couple hundred files downloaded. I think some folks came to the show through the torrent, though that was because they'd searched for the names of guests on torrent search engines.

                      It's a nice thing to do, but it wasn't hugely important.

                      Jesse
                    • tim
                      another thing, if you post files in say yahoo groups, your post seems isolated, from the cyber world.... ie it wont suddenly appear in a google
                      Message 10 of 17 , May 27, 2010
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                        another thing,
                        if you post files in say yahoo groups, your post
                        seems isolated, from the cyber world.... ie it wont suddenly appear
                        in a google search.

                        whereas all of the files Ive posted... I type into google and they come up!
                        they even show up on google alerts !

                        _________________________________________________________________
                        http://clk.atdmt.com/UKM/go/197222280/direct/01/
                        Do you have a story that started on Hotmail? Tell us now

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Patrick McNa...
                        ... Go to Mininova.org and read up on their Content Distribution service. It s free and posting a file isn t any more difficult than posting one to
                        Message 11 of 17 , May 27, 2010
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                          --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Andelman/Mr. Media" <bob@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > This is a fascinating discussion; I never even thought about distributing Mr. Media Radio files through torrents. Can anyone offer some how-to advice and where-to?
                          >
                          > Thanks!
                          >
                          > Bob Andelman

                          Go to Mininova.org and read up on their Content Distribution service. It's free and posting a file isn't any more difficult than posting one to Archive.org.
                        • Patrick McNa...
                          ... Maybe not, but people do go to torrent sites looking for stuff to download. And if they find the podcast there they might download it. However, how many
                          Message 12 of 17 , May 27, 2010
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                            --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Eley <SFEley@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > On Thu, May 27, 2010 at 10:25 AM, andrew clarke <mail@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > For very popular podcasts with a lot of listeners BitTorrent may
                            > > still be useful, but the more popular podcasts probably have sponsors
                            > > or encourage listener donations via PayPal, etc.
                            >
                            > It's only useful if enough listeners look for and download podcasts
                            > via BitTorrent to make it worth the extra work.

                            Maybe not, but people do go to torrent sites looking for stuff to download. And if they find the podcast there they might download it. However, how many people are going to go to a blog site if they don't even know about it?

                            The torrents work not so much because it's a system of distribution as a system of promotion. By putting your podcast on a site like Mininova people can find it, particularly people who weren't even looking for it in the first place. That's why it works. It's like a directory. Unfortunately, not all torrent sites work like Mininova so new torrents can get buried on many torrent sites.
                          • Patrick McNa...
                            ... Worse compared to what? I ve seen better downloads from the torrents than from the RSS feeds, and there s nothing less popular than poetry. It is up to you
                            Message 13 of 17 , May 27, 2010
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                              --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Eley <SFEley@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > On Thu, May 27, 2010 at 1:32 PM, andrew clarke <mail@...> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > ... the more popular podcasts probably have sponsors or encourage
                              > > listener donations via PayPal, etc., so can afford to pay for web
                              > > hosting instead of resorting to BitTorrent.
                              >
                              > The baseline Libsyn account is still $5 per month. If that's too much
                              > money, there's always Archive.org. (Download speeds are sporadic
                              > there, but it's still free.)
                              >
                              > And don't forget: less popular podcasts are likely to do *worse* with
                              > BitTorrent. If nobody's seeding your content, it doesn't matter how
                              > many places you have the .torrent file posted.
                              >

                              Worse compared to what? I've seen better downloads from the torrents than from the RSS feeds, and there's nothing less popular than poetry.

                              It is up to you to make sure that your podcast is seeded if you want people to download it. Fortunately, with Mininova's Content Distribution service, they provide a seed of the file.
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