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Hand Hardware-- a rig for shooting video and recording audio at the same time

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  • RatbagMedia
    While I use a mini disc recorder I often want to selectively shoot video and record audio at the same time. I may podcast the audio after editing and
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 14, 2009
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      While I use a mini disc recorder I often want to selectively shoot video and record audio at the same time. I may podcast the audio after editing and separately videoblog the video. So I want to use two recording modes.

      I also use the audio for transcribing interviews and the like(eg: capturing press conferences). So I rigged up my MD disc recorder to my camera like so:
      http://ratbaggy.blogspot.com/2009/07/hand-hardware-rig-for-shooting-video.html
      It is a solution that could be adapted to any audio recording device -- that is if you also wanted to concurrently shoot video and not pay for a new and separate audio setup.

      The main reason I wore the recorder on my wrist/forearm strapped to my video camera is that I wanted easy mobility without cumbersome bags and devices strapped around my middle.


      dave riley.
    • Stephen Eley
      ... Interesting idea. If I understand your blog post correctly, though -- you haven t tried this in the field yet? Even with the arm support it looks like it
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 14, 2009
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        On Tue, Jul 14, 2009 at 8:59 AM, RatbagMedia<ratbagradio@...> wrote:
        >
        > I also use the audio  for transcribing interviews and the like(eg: capturing press conferences). So I rigged up my MD disc recorder to my camera like so:
        > http://ratbaggy.blogspot.com/2009/07/hand-hardware-rig-for-shooting-video.html

        Interesting idea. If I understand your blog post correctly, though --
        you haven't tried this in the field yet? Even with the arm support it
        looks like it could be unwieldy and get heavy after a while. And
        putting the camera down to do anything else with your hand seems
        problematic.

        I'm curious what sorts of events you're planning to use this for. It
        seems to me that in most cases it'd be much simpler just to use the
        video camera as your audio device -- run the good mic into it, record
        the _whole_ thing on video, and then edit down the video later but
        keep the whole audio track. Consumer video devices may have lousy
        built-in mics, but plug a decent one in and most can capture proper
        44.1 or 48 kHz stereo sound without breaking a sweat.



        --
        Have Fun,
        Steve Eley (sfeley@...)
        ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
        http://www.escapepod.org
      • RatbagMedia
        ... I ve used it. it works fine. To do something else you simply unstrap the Ultrapod. I can similarly mount the set up on a stand or table and its all rigged
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 14, 2009
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          --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Eley <SFEley@...> wrote:
          >
          > On Tue, Jul 14, 2009 at 8:59 AM, RatbagMedia<ratbagradio@...> wrote:

          > I'm curious what sorts of events you're planning to use this for.

          I've used it. it works fine. To do something else you simply unstrap the Ultrapod. I can similarly mount the set up on a stand or table and its all rigged set to go -- if necessary I don't have to use a mic on the camcorder but run a lead to the speaker's mike instead or the meeting amplifier setup.

          The point being I can sort of sync two recording devices in real time -- as I set out to do.

          > It seems to me that in most cases it'd be much simpler just to use the
          > video camera as your audio device -- run the good mic into it, record
          > the _whole_ thing on video, and then edit down the video later but
          > keep the whole audio track.

          That presumes that I edit the video first. I often have to access the audio straight after the event to write newspaper copy.

          In most instances, such as if I'm working to cover a protest march, I need both the mobility and the recording length the audio assures when my mini DV camera power resource can cut out after a time if I don't have a reserve battery pack.(But then I don't want to edit heaps of video or overload my computer with huge video files but still have the event extensively covered)

          I think audio is good for covering talk but when you engage with other occasions you need to be flexible and wonder what suits the coverage/reportage.

          I found that with podcasting an event -- I ended up with a lot of audio and the challenge of a subtle edit to bring it to a worthy publishing. It is also the case that online you will , if you publish ab hoc and only occasionally as I do -- you will pull more viewers than listeners -- that's a video fact of web life today.(Despite the fact that online web video more often than not offers simply atrocious sound quality.)

          So do I want to forgo audio? No. So what I do is straddle media and for me I try to do it el cheapo and sue what I've got (and what I already know).

          I'm oh so multimedia, you see.

          I face the same debate in regard to covering conferences. You want an clear audio record of each or most of the presentations. But you also want enough video to give people a taste of the event, edited up as to summarize the main issues, debates or whatever. Theres' an unbearable habit online to shoot whole talks in video format as though someone wants to sit and watch some talking head address them from their computer screen for an unbroken 60 minutes.

          But some talks, short ones, can work -- even if divided up into short video segments for online publishing.


          dave riley
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