Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Compression?

Expand Messages
  • Waleed Ovase
    Hey Guys, I was just wondering... What exactly does a Compressor (plugin or otherwise...) do? thanks :) waldo -- Waleed Waldo Ovase Executive Producer Giant
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 27, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Hey Guys,
      I was just wondering...

      What exactly does a Compressor (plugin or otherwise...) do?


      thanks :)


      waldo

      --
      Waleed "Waldo" Ovase
      Executive Producer
      Giant Gnome Productions
      www.giantgnome.com
      Republicans will be back.

      "...you know what? I still get out of bed
      every day and make coffee, smoke some crack cocaine, put on my Richard
      Nixon mask and foam rubber cowboy hat and go to work like everyone
      else..."
      - Edward Morris


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Stephen Nelson
      It amplifies quiet parts of the audio and reduces loud parts, making the whole thing more uniform.
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 27, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        It amplifies quiet parts of the audio and reduces loud parts, making the
        whole thing more uniform.

        Waleed Ovase wrote:
        > Hey Guys,
        > I was just wondering...
        >
        > What exactly does a Compressor (plugin or otherwise...) do?
        >
        >
        > thanks :)
        >
        >
        > waldo
        >
        >
      • Waleed Ovase
        Oh! Gotcha. Thanks :) ... -- Waleed Waldo Ovase Executive Producer Giant Gnome Productions www.giantgnome.com Republicans will be back. ...you know what?
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 27, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Oh! Gotcha. Thanks :)

          On Sat, Dec 27, 2008 at 23:41, Stephen Nelson <stephenenelson@...>wrote:

          > It amplifies quiet parts of the audio and reduces loud parts, making the
          >
          > whole thing more uniform.
          >
          >
          > Waleed Ovase wrote:
          > > Hey Guys,
          > > I was just wondering...
          > >
          > > What exactly does a Compressor (plugin or otherwise...) do?
          > >
          > >
          > > thanks :)
          > >
          > >
          > > waldo
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >



          --
          Waleed "Waldo" Ovase
          Executive Producer
          Giant Gnome Productions
          www.giantgnome.com
          Republicans will be back.

          "...you know what? I still get out of bed
          every day and make coffee, smoke some crack cocaine, put on my Richard
          Nixon mask and foam rubber cowboy hat and go to work like everyone
          else..."
          - Edward Morris


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • David Smith
          ... What bugs me about Compression is the term itself. The first thing Compression makes me think of is something like ZIP or LHA -- making files smaller.
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 27, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            It was 27 Dec 2008, when Waleed Ovase commented:

            > Hey Guys,
            > I was just wondering...
            >
            > What exactly does a Compressor (plugin or otherwise...) do?

            What bugs me about Compression is the term itself. The first thing
            "Compression" makes me think of is something like ZIP or LHA -- making
            files smaller. The term "compression" is used for different things. That
            seems to happen a lot in digital audio discussions.

            What Compression means in this context, is making the soft parts louder
            and the loud parts softer, so the overall amplitude of the audio varies
            much less. The dynamic range is "compressed." This can make the audio
            easier to listen to, if done well. You can also lose dynamic variety that
            way, which may detract from the quality of the audio. And some
            compressors can make stuff sound kind of odd, if done badly.

            There's also another sort of compression, that does make files smaller,
            sometimes by storing the audio more effectively, sometimes by throwing
            away "unnecessary" data in the audio file. A .WAV file is uncompressed
            (and tends to be large), an .MP3 file uses what's called "lossy"
            compression, throwing away some of the data to save space. There are some
            audio formats that are smaller than WAV files but don't throw away data,
            they tell me. Never used 'em.

            You may have heard of a program called "Levelator." That's a program that
            does, in a rather magical fashion, a standard set of Stuff to an
            uncompressed audio file composed entirely of recorded speech, usually a
            .WAV file, so it "sounds better." It was created by a podcasting
            organization called "The Conversations Network," because they were doing
            lots and lots of interviews, and doing essentially the same stuff to all
            those interviews.

            Levelator does all the stuff (including compression) they usually did to
            those interview files, consistently, and in one swell foop. Timesaver.
            With a decent recording to start with, it produces a sound similar to NPR,
            in the opinion of younger folks with better hearing than I. Works well
            for recorded speech, isn't intended to be used on music.

            Because of Levelator, I don't worry much about compression per se. I
            record the talking parts of my podcast, run them through Levelator, then
            combine those pieces with the musical parts in Audacity, and export to an
            MP3. Not perfect, but good enough for what I'm trying to accomplish, I
            think.

            --

            Grizzly's Growls Podcasts: <http://grizzlysgrowls.com>
            Blog: <http://blog.grizzlysgrowls.com>
            The NaNaPooPoo Podcast Community Network:
            <http://feeds.nanapoopoo.com>
          • essential_pepsi
            Definitely agree with you, the term compression sucks. Don t get me started on the term limiter, either. If you want to hear the difference between
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 28, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Definitely agree with you, the term "compression" sucks. Don't get me
              started on the term limiter, either.

              If you want to hear the difference between "compression" adjusted
              audio and levelator, just listen to the episode zero and episode one
              podcasts for Psychotic Resumes.

              Ep zero was using Audacity's compressor and limiter, Episode One was
              done using levelator only, and as such has a much fuller sound. It
              took me two weeks of wondering what to do about the hollow sound of
              the pilot and only five minutes of reading Podcasting for Dummies to
              figure out that I was an idiot for trying to do it myself.

              -Nick

              --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, "David Smith" <grizzly@...> wrote:
              >
              > It was 27 Dec 2008, when Waleed Ovase commented:
              >
              > > Hey Guys,
              > > I was just wondering...
              > >
              > > What exactly does a Compressor (plugin or otherwise...) do?
              >
              > What bugs me about Compression is the term itself. The first thing
              > "Compression" makes me think of is something like ZIP or LHA -- making
              > files smaller. The term "compression" is used for different things.
              That
              > seems to happen a lot in digital audio discussions.
              >
              > What Compression means in this context, is making the soft parts louder
              > and the loud parts softer, so the overall amplitude of the audio varies
              > much less. The dynamic range is "compressed." This can make the audio
              > easier to listen to, if done well. You can also lose dynamic
              variety that
              > way, which may detract from the quality of the audio. And some
              > compressors can make stuff sound kind of odd, if done badly.
              >
              > There's also another sort of compression, that does make files smaller,
              > sometimes by storing the audio more effectively, sometimes by throwing
              > away "unnecessary" data in the audio file. A .WAV file is uncompressed
              > (and tends to be large), an .MP3 file uses what's called "lossy"
              > compression, throwing away some of the data to save space. There
              are some
              > audio formats that are smaller than WAV files but don't throw away
              data,
              > they tell me. Never used 'em.
              >
              > You may have heard of a program called "Levelator." That's a
              program that
              > does, in a rather magical fashion, a standard set of Stuff to an
              > uncompressed audio file composed entirely of recorded speech, usually a
              > .WAV file, so it "sounds better." It was created by a podcasting
              > organization called "The Conversations Network," because they were
              doing
              > lots and lots of interviews, and doing essentially the same stuff to
              all
              > those interviews.
              >
              > Levelator does all the stuff (including compression) they usually
              did to
              > those interview files, consistently, and in one swell foop.
              Timesaver.
              > With a decent recording to start with, it produces a sound similar
              to NPR,
              > in the opinion of younger folks with better hearing than I. Works well
              > for recorded speech, isn't intended to be used on music.
              >
              > Because of Levelator, I don't worry much about compression per se. I
              > record the talking parts of my podcast, run them through Levelator,
              then
              > combine those pieces with the musical parts in Audacity, and export
              to an
              > MP3. Not perfect, but good enough for what I'm trying to accomplish, I
              > think.
              >
              > --
              >
              > Grizzly's Growls Podcasts: <http://grizzlysgrowls.com>
              > Blog: <http://blog.grizzlysgrowls.com>
              > The NaNaPooPoo Podcast Community Network:
              > <http://feeds.nanapoopoo.com>
              >
            • Richard Amirault
              ... From: Stephen Nelson ... Are you sure?? I m not an expert but I m pretty sure it only reduces the loud parts. You *can* then turn up the gain on
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 28, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Stephen Nelson"

                > It amplifies quiet parts of the audio and reduces loud parts, making the
                > whole thing more uniform.


                Are you sure?? I'm not an expert but I'm pretty sure it only reduces the
                loud parts. You *can* then turn up the gain on *everything* and thus
                "amplify quiet parts" .. but that's not part of what a compressor does
                itself.

                I think we need someone like Steve Eley to give a more authoritive answer
                ;-)

                Richard Amirault
                Boston, MA, USA
                http://n1jdu.org
                http://bostonfandom.org
                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7hf9u2ZdlQ
              • Waleed Ovase
                Alright, then what is a Multi Compressor and what does it do? waldo ... -- Waleed Waldo Ovase Executive Producer Giant Gnome Productions
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 28, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Alright, then what is a "Multi Compressor" and what does it do?

                  waldo

                  On Sun, Dec 28, 2008 at 02:38, David Smith <grizzly@...>wrote:

                  > It was 27 Dec 2008, when Waleed Ovase commented:
                  >
                  > > Hey Guys,
                  > > I was just wondering...
                  > >
                  > > What exactly does a Compressor (plugin or otherwise...) do?
                  >
                  > What bugs me about Compression is the term itself. The first thing
                  > "Compression" makes me think of is something like ZIP or LHA -- making
                  > files smaller. The term "compression" is used for different things. That
                  > seems to happen a lot in digital audio discussions.
                  >
                  > What Compression means in this context, is making the soft parts louder
                  > and the loud parts softer, so the overall amplitude of the audio varies
                  > much less. The dynamic range is "compressed." This can make the audio
                  > easier to listen to, if done well. You can also lose dynamic variety that
                  > way, which may detract from the quality of the audio. And some
                  > compressors can make stuff sound kind of odd, if done badly.
                  >
                  > There's also another sort of compression, that does make files smaller,
                  > sometimes by storing the audio more effectively, sometimes by throwing
                  > away "unnecessary" data in the audio file. A .WAV file is uncompressed
                  > (and tends to be large), an .MP3 file uses what's called "lossy"
                  > compression, throwing away some of the data to save space. There are some
                  > audio formats that are smaller than WAV files but don't throw away data,
                  > they tell me. Never used 'em.
                  >
                  > You may have heard of a program called "Levelator." That's a program that
                  > does, in a rather magical fashion, a standard set of Stuff to an
                  > uncompressed audio file composed entirely of recorded speech, usually a
                  > .WAV file, so it "sounds better." It was created by a podcasting
                  > organization called "The Conversations Network," because they were doing
                  > lots and lots of interviews, and doing essentially the same stuff to all
                  > those interviews.
                  >
                  > Levelator does all the stuff (including compression) they usually did to
                  > those interview files, consistently, and in one swell foop. Timesaver.
                  > With a decent recording to start with, it produces a sound similar to NPR,
                  > in the opinion of younger folks with better hearing than I. Works well
                  > for recorded speech, isn't intended to be used on music.
                  >
                  > Because of Levelator, I don't worry much about compression per se. I
                  > record the talking parts of my podcast, run them through Levelator, then
                  > combine those pieces with the musical parts in Audacity, and export to an
                  > MP3. Not perfect, but good enough for what I'm trying to accomplish, I
                  > think.
                  >
                  > --
                  >
                  > Grizzly's Growls Podcasts: <http://grizzlysgrowls.com>
                  > Blog: <http://blog.grizzlysgrowls.com>
                  > The NaNaPooPoo Podcast Community Network:
                  > <http://feeds.nanapoopoo.com>
                  >
                  >
                  >



                  --
                  Waleed "Waldo" Ovase
                  Executive Producer
                  Giant Gnome Productions
                  www.giantgnome.com
                  Republicans will be back.

                  "...you know what? I still get out of bed
                  every day and make coffee, smoke some crack cocaine, put on my Richard
                  Nixon mask and foam rubber cowboy hat and go to work like everyone
                  else..."
                  - Edward Morris


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Stephen Nelson
                  Technically you re right, of course, but since the compressor effect I use also does amplification, it works out to the same thing. Authoritatively, here s
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 28, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Technically you're right, of course, but since the "compressor" effect I
                    use also does amplification, it works out to the same thing.

                    Authoritatively, here's what it says in the Soundtrack Pro manual:

                    "The Compressor is designed to emulate the sound and response of a
                    professional-level
                    analog (hardware) compressor. It tightens up your audio by reducing
                    sounds that
                    exceed a certain threshold level, smoothing out the dynamics and
                    increasing the overall
                    volume—the perceived loudness."

                    Steve Eley is, of course, even more authoritative than that. :)

                    Richard Amirault wrote:
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: "Stephen Nelson"
                    >
                    >
                    >> It amplifies quiet parts of the audio and reduces loud parts, making the
                    >> whole thing more uniform.
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    > Are you sure?? I'm not an expert but I'm pretty sure it only reduces the
                    > loud parts. You *can* then turn up the gain on *everything* and thus
                    > "amplify quiet parts" .. but that's not part of what a compressor does
                    > itself.
                    >
                    > I think we need someone like Steve Eley to give a more authoritive answer
                    > ;-)
                    >
                    > Richard Amirault
                    > Boston, MA, USA
                    > http://n1jdu.org
                    > http://bostonfandom.org
                    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7hf9u2ZdlQ
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > YahooGroups Podcasters Links
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Steve Riekeberg
                    A Multi Compressor... or Multi*band* Compressor is a more specialized compressor can compress different rages of frequencies differently, for example (without
                    Message 9 of 10 , Dec 28, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      A Multi Compressor... or Multi*band* Compressor is a more specialized
                      compressor can compress different rages of frequencies differently, for
                      example (without getting too technically specific) doing light compression
                      on the lower-end, and more compression on the higher end; a standard
                      compressor will normally uniformly compress all frequencies, which in some
                      situations you might not want.

                      While somewhat technical, Wikipedia has a fairly good article on compression
                      in general, along with a little bit on Multiband Compression:
                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio_level_compression#Multiband_compression

                      Hope this helps,

                      Steve Riekeberg
                      Host, Geek Cred
                      <http://www.geekcred.net>

                      On Sun, Dec 28, 2008 at 9:26 AM, Waleed Ovase <americanbookmoghuls@...
                      > wrote:

                      > Alright, then what is a "Multi Compressor" and what does it do?
                      >
                      > waldo
                      >
                      > On Sun, Dec 28, 2008 at 02:38, David Smith <grizzly@...<grizzly%40grizzlysgrowls.com>
                      > >wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > > It was 27 Dec 2008, when Waleed Ovase commented:
                      > >
                      > > > Hey Guys,
                      > > > I was just wondering...
                      > > >
                      > > > What exactly does a Compressor (plugin or otherwise...) do?
                      > >
                      > > What bugs me about Compression is the term itself. The first thing
                      > > "Compression" makes me think of is something like ZIP or LHA -- making
                      > > files smaller. The term "compression" is used for different things. That
                      > > seems to happen a lot in digital audio discussions.
                      > >
                      > > What Compression means in this context, is making the soft parts louder
                      > > and the loud parts softer, so the overall amplitude of the audio varies
                      > > much less. The dynamic range is "compressed." This can make the audio
                      > > easier to listen to, if done well. You can also lose dynamic variety that
                      > > way, which may detract from the quality of the audio. And some
                      > > compressors can make stuff sound kind of odd, if done badly.
                      > >
                      > > There's also another sort of compression, that does make files smaller,
                      > > sometimes by storing the audio more effectively, sometimes by throwing
                      > > away "unnecessary" data in the audio file. A .WAV file is uncompressed
                      > > (and tends to be large), an .MP3 file uses what's called "lossy"
                      > > compression, throwing away some of the data to save space. There are some
                      > > audio formats that are smaller than WAV files but don't throw away data,
                      > > they tell me. Never used 'em.
                      > >
                      > > You may have heard of a program called "Levelator." That's a program that
                      > > does, in a rather magical fashion, a standard set of Stuff to an
                      > > uncompressed audio file composed entirely of recorded speech, usually a
                      > > .WAV file, so it "sounds better." It was created by a podcasting
                      > > organization called "The Conversations Network," because they were doing
                      > > lots and lots of interviews, and doing essentially the same stuff to all
                      > > those interviews.
                      > >
                      > > Levelator does all the stuff (including compression) they usually did to
                      > > those interview files, consistently, and in one swell foop. Timesaver.
                      > > With a decent recording to start with, it produces a sound similar to
                      > NPR,
                      > > in the opinion of younger folks with better hearing than I. Works well
                      > > for recorded speech, isn't intended to be used on music.
                      > >
                      > > Because of Levelator, I don't worry much about compression per se. I
                      > > record the talking parts of my podcast, run them through Levelator, then
                      > > combine those pieces with the musical parts in Audacity, and export to an
                      > > MP3. Not perfect, but good enough for what I'm trying to accomplish, I
                      > > think.
                      > >
                      > > --
                      > >
                      > > Grizzly's Growls Podcasts: <http://grizzlysgrowls.com>
                      > > Blog: <http://blog.grizzlysgrowls.com>
                      > > The NaNaPooPoo Podcast Community Network:
                      > > <http://feeds.nanapoopoo.com>
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      > --
                      > Waleed "Waldo" Ovase
                      > Executive Producer
                      > Giant Gnome Productions
                      > www.giantgnome.com
                      > Republicans will be back.
                      >
                      > "...you know what? I still get out of bed
                      > every day and make coffee, smoke some crack cocaine, put on my Richard
                      > Nixon mask and foam rubber cowboy hat and go to work like everyone
                      > else..."
                      > - Edward Morris
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Stephen Eley
                      On Sun, Dec 28, 2008 at 12:07 PM, Richard Amirault ... Steve Eley (who isn t really an authority, he s just a smartass) says you re technically right -- but in
                      Message 10 of 10 , Dec 28, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        On Sun, Dec 28, 2008 at 12:07 PM, Richard Amirault
                        <ramirault@...> wrote:
                        > From: "Stephen Nelson"
                        >
                        >> It amplifies quiet parts of the audio and reduces loud parts, making the
                        >> whole thing more uniform.
                        >
                        > Are you sure?? I'm not an expert but I'm pretty sure it only reduces the
                        > loud parts. You *can* then turn up the gain on *everything* and thus
                        > "amplify quiet parts" .. but that's not part of what a compressor does
                        > itself.
                        >
                        > I think we need someone like Steve Eley to give a more authoritive answer
                        > ;-)

                        Steve Eley (who isn't really an authority, he's just a smartass) says
                        you're technically right -- but in practice, most compressor plugins
                        in modern sound apps have automatic gain built in after the
                        compression, so to the outside observer it's like doing both in one
                        step.


                        --
                        Have Fun,
                        Steve Eley (sfeley@...)
                        ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
                        http://www.escapepod.org
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.