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Re: [podcasters] Advanced WordPress Book?

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  • Stephen Eley
    ... I would agree with this; I ve also found it extremely difficult to navigate, with badly broken search, and it s difficult to tell which parts are current
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 6, 2008
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      On Wed, Aug 6, 2008 at 2:40 PM, ma scrub <ma_scrub@...> wrote:
      > I find that the codex is written for the people who wrote the codex. They already understand
      > Wordpress thoroughly and assume that others do. My sense of logic, or lack thereof, is quite different from theirs. I found the Dummies book about Wordpress too basic, although I did learn one thing from it. The codex is at the opposite extreme. And if you don't understand the codex, don't expect a kind response from the Wordpress forum.

      I would agree with this; I've also found it extremely difficult to
      navigate, with badly broken search, and it's difficult to tell which
      parts are current and which refer to old versions of Wordpress.

      Unfortunately, there is no advanced reference at this time. Most of
      what I know about Wordpress, I figured out from looking at the PHP
      source code itself. This is effective for a reasonably skilled
      programmer, but it's rarely efficient, and it does leave smart but
      non-technical users pretty much in the dust. I'm really surprised
      Wordpress is as successful as it's been under such conditions. I can
      only attribute it to everything else being worse.


      --
      Have Fun,
      Steve Eley (sfeley@...)
      ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
      http://www.escapepod.org
    • Paul McElligott
      Part of the problem is that by the time they get a Wordpress 2.6 book to press, we ll probably be on Wordpress 3. Why produce a book when it will be obsolete
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 6, 2008
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        Part of the problem is that by the time they get a Wordpress 2.6 book
        to press, we'll probably be on Wordpress 3. Why produce a book when it
        will be obsolete by the time you get it in anyone's hands? They can't
        even keep the codex up to date... what hope do the "dead-tree"
        publishers have?

        What we really need are three guides: A user's guide, a theme-maker's
        guide and a plug-in writer's guide. If I just want to use Wordpress to
        create a blog, I don't need to know how the sausage is made.
        --
        Paul McElligott
        Recalculating Temple Owl



        On Wed, Aug 6, 2008 at 12:28 PM, Stephen Eley <SFEley@...> wrote:
        > On Wed, Aug 6, 2008 at 2:40 PM, ma scrub <ma_scrub@...> wrote:
        >> I find that the codex is written for the people who wrote the codex. They
        >> already understand
        >> Wordpress thoroughly and assume that others do. My sense of logic, or lack
        >> thereof, is quite different from theirs. I found the Dummies book about
        >> Wordpress too basic, although I did learn one thing from it. The codex is at
        >> the opposite extreme. And if you don't understand the codex, don't expect a
        >> kind response from the Wordpress forum.
        >
        > I would agree with this; I've also found it extremely difficult to
        > navigate, with badly broken search, and it's difficult to tell which
        > parts are current and which refer to old versions of Wordpress.
        >
        > Unfortunately, there is no advanced reference at this time. Most of
        > what I know about Wordpress, I figured out from looking at the PHP
        > source code itself. This is effective for a reasonably skilled
        > programmer, but it's rarely efficient, and it does leave smart but
        > non-technical users pretty much in the dust. I'm really surprised
        > Wordpress is as successful as it's been under such conditions. I can
        > only attribute it to everything else being worse.
        >
        > --
        > Have Fun,
        > Steve Eley (sfeley@...)
        > ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
        > http://www.escapepod.org
        >
        >
      • Mike Wills
        I am all for that. I would want the plug-in and theme one at this point. The problem I see with this is that there are thousands of plug-ins and there might be
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 6, 2008
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          I am all for that. I would want the plug-in and theme one at this point.

          The problem I see with this is that there are thousands of plug-ins and
          there might be one that I want to use, but it is so obscure that you would
          never find it unless someone else happens to have heard of it and happens to
          see your inquiry.

          On Wed, Aug 6, 2008 at 3:12 PM, Paul McElligott
          <mcelligott.paul@...>wrote:

          > Part of the problem is that by the time they get a Wordpress 2.6 book
          > to press, we'll probably be on Wordpress 3. Why produce a book when it
          > will be obsolete by the time you get it in anyone's hands? They can't
          > even keep the codex up to date... what hope do the "dead-tree"
          > publishers have?
          >
          > What we really need are three guides: A user's guide, a theme-maker's
          > guide and a plug-in writer's guide. If I just want to use Wordpress to
          > create a blog, I don't need to know how the sausage is made.
          > --
          > Paul McElligott
          > Recalculating Temple Owl
          >
          >
          >
          > On Wed, Aug 6, 2008 at 12:28 PM, Stephen Eley <SFEley@...> wrote:
          > > On Wed, Aug 6, 2008 at 2:40 PM, ma scrub <ma_scrub@...> wrote:
          > >> I find that the codex is written for the people who wrote the codex.
          > They
          > >> already understand
          > >> Wordpress thoroughly and assume that others do. My sense of logic, or
          > lack
          > >> thereof, is quite different from theirs. I found the Dummies book about
          > >> Wordpress too basic, although I did learn one thing from it. The codex
          > is at
          > >> the opposite extreme. And if you don't understand the codex, don't
          > expect a
          > >> kind response from the Wordpress forum.
          > >
          > > I would agree with this; I've also found it extremely difficult to
          > > navigate, with badly broken search, and it's difficult to tell which
          > > parts are current and which refer to old versions of Wordpress.
          > >
          > > Unfortunately, there is no advanced reference at this time. Most of
          > > what I know about Wordpress, I figured out from looking at the PHP
          > > source code itself. This is effective for a reasonably skilled
          > > programmer, but it's rarely efficient, and it does leave smart but
          > > non-technical users pretty much in the dust. I'm really surprised
          > > Wordpress is as successful as it's been under such conditions. I can
          > > only attribute it to everything else being worse.
          > >
          > > --
          > > Have Fun,
          > > Steve Eley (sfeley@...)
          > > ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
          > > http://www.escapepod.org
          > >
          > >
          >
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          --
          Mike Wills
          mike@...
          Podcast Mike Productions http://podcastmike.com
          Skype: koldark | Ph: 612-605-9821 (on CST or GMT -6)
          Stalk me at http://friendfeed.com/mikewills

          Podcasts:
          Mike's Hotdish -- http://mikeshotdish.com
          Music Remyx -- http://musicremyx.com


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