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TeamSpeak for podcasting?

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  • David Smith
    Just did a semi-guest-spot on the 535 York podcast, a tech-oriented show based out of the ILoveTechTV Yahoo Group. I was a bit intrigued by the potential of
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 3, 2008
      Just did a semi-guest-spot on the "535 York" podcast, a tech-oriented show
      based out of the ILoveTechTV Yahoo Group. I was a bit intrigued by the
      potential of the tool they use for doing a group podcast, a client-server
      setup called TeamSpeak <http://goteamspeak.com>.

      TeamSpeak is intended for online gamer teams to communicate by voice while
      gaming. It's extremely low-profile, and runs comfortably on my aging
      Win98SE laptop. Each participant has push-to-talk access to the group.
      The advantage there is that between voices, there's absolute silence, not
      background hiss or other distortion. This is fine for use for a recorded
      program that will be edited down later, and might be okay for some sorts
      of streamed programming, I suppose.

      Didn't catch the specifics yet, but the audio seems of reasonable quality.
      Sounds much better than Skype IMHO. And each user has the option to
      record on their own system, to a WAV file. What 535 York does is have one
      person record the whole session, then edit all the voices down to the
      show. This eliminates the silent, unkeyed moments, and produces a very
      tightly-paced show, which sounds recorded live. It sounds like there
      might be a speed-selection problem in how they edit, it sounds faster than
      it actually was live. But the effect overall is a Good Thing for a tech-
      oriented podcast.

      The downside for interviews would be the requirement that each participant
      install the TeamSpeak client (which is free for non-commercial use) and
      configure to connect to the right server (which is likewise free). I
      doubt interviewees would be willing to do that. But I could see an
      interstate or international Group Thing working rather well with such a
      setup. Works for 535 York, IMHO.

      I just installed a TeamSpeak server on my mailserver machine the other
      night. Trying to figure out a practical way to make use of it for
      Something Some Day Real Soon.

      Anybody else tinkered with TeamSpeak for podcasting? Opinions,
      suggestions, questions?

      --
      Grizzly's Growls
      The Life and Times of a Minor Local Celebrity
      Podcast: <http://grizzly.libsyn.com>
      Blog: <http://grizzlysgrowls.blogspot.com>
    • the Encaffeinated ONE
      I ve used Teamspeak for gaming, and it has its good sides and its issues.. Here s a rambly commentary.. The push-to-talk is not mandatory; rather, each
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 4, 2008
        I've used Teamspeak for gaming, and it has its good sides and its
        issues.. Here's a rambly commentary..

        The "push-to-talk" is not mandatory; rather, each person sets up their
        client either to push-to-talk or talk-to-talk, which is really
        essential for hands-free gaming. I've found that the push-to-talk
        mode can result in unintended self-censoring, as you forget to press
        the button and cut yourself off.

        The sound quality is quite variable. I've had sessions which rival
        Skype, but most of the time the quality is far worse. Now granted: I
        have two people in the apartment both playing WoW and using Teamspeak,
        but the quality varies even between those two people; for example, one
        person might hear everyone perfectly, while the other barely hears
        anything.

        Even if you get reasonable volume levels, the sound quality isn't much
        better than phone, I believe, perhaps worse. Occasionally odd things
        like echoing and bouncing occur, but with decent headphones and mikes
        that might be minimized (we are all using simple headset
        mike/headphones for Teamspeak).

        This is with a paid-for server at a third-party location. Control over
        your own server may work out better, especially if people you are
        connecting with are either on fast or few network hops from you.

        I don't know how the licensing works, but that "free, but for
        non-commercial use" starts to raise a red flag, especially because I'd
        like to earn a modest self-sustaining income from my podcast
        "someday", and don't really want strings attached.

        Good luck!

        encaf1

        On Thu, Apr 3, 2008 at 8:59 PM, David Smith <dbsmith01@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Just did a semi-guest-spot on the "535 York" podcast, a tech-oriented show
        > based out of the ILoveTechTV Yahoo Group. I was a bit intrigued by the
        > potential of the tool they use for doing a group podcast, a client-server
        > setup called TeamSpeak <http://goteamspeak.com>.
        >
        > TeamSpeak is intended for online gamer teams to communicate by voice while
        > gaming. It's extremely low-profile, and runs comfortably on my aging
        > Win98SE laptop. Each participant has push-to-talk access to the group.
        > The advantage there is that between voices, there's absolute silence, not
        > background hiss or other distortion. This is fine for use for a recorded
        > program that will be edited down later, and might be okay for some sorts
        > of streamed programming, I suppose.
        >
        > Didn't catch the specifics yet, but the audio seems of reasonable quality.
        > Sounds much better than Skype IMHO. And each user has the option to
        > record on their own system, to a WAV file. What 535 York does is have one
        > person record the whole session, then edit all the voices down to the
        > show. This eliminates the silent, unkeyed moments, and produces a very
        > tightly-paced show, which sounds recorded live. It sounds like there
        > might be a speed-selection problem in how they edit, it sounds faster than
        > it actually was live. But the effect overall is a Good Thing for a tech-
        > oriented podcast.
        >
        > The downside for interviews would be the requirement that each participant
        > install the TeamSpeak client (which is free for non-commercial use) and
        > configure to connect to the right server (which is likewise free). I
        > doubt interviewees would be willing to do that. But I could see an
        > interstate or international Group Thing working rather well with such a
        > setup. Works for 535 York, IMHO.
        >
        > I just installed a TeamSpeak server on my mailserver machine the other
        > night. Trying to figure out a practical way to make use of it for
        > Something Some Day Real Soon.
        >
        > Anybody else tinkered with TeamSpeak for podcasting? Opinions,
        > suggestions, questions?
        >
        > --
        > Grizzly's Growls
        > The Life and Times of a Minor Local Celebrity
        > Podcast: <http://grizzly.libsyn.com>
        > Blog: <http://grizzlysgrowls.blogspot.com>
        >
        >
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