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Podcasts using these mics?

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  • Blasterbot5555
    I m in the process of starting a podcast and am thinking about getting one of those Giant Squid Audio stereo lavailers for doing interviews on the street and
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 31, 2007
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      I'm in the process of starting a podcast and am thinking about getting
      one of those Giant Squid Audio stereo lavailers for doing interviews
      on the street and such. I've heard great things about this mic and
      I've heard the demos on the GSA website, but I'm wondering if anyone
      uses this mic themselves or knows of a podcast that does? It'd be
      great to hear it in real-world use.

      The mic I'm looking at is here: http://www.giant-squid-audio-lab.com/gs/gs-podcast_stereo.html

      About my main mic: I have a dynamic handheld mic that I bought a few
      years ago (a Shure PG something-or-other) that I was thinking of
      using. I'm sure it would be fine. But I've heard that condenser mics
      sound 10 times better, so I'm thinking about picking up an inexpensive
      model. Is anyone using either of the cheap Marshalls--either the 990
      or the V57M?
    • Stephen Eley
      ... Here s a collection of field interviews I did with the Giant Squid stereo omni a little over a year ago:
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 1, 2008
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        On Dec 31, 2007 7:41 PM, Blasterbot5555 <blasterbot5555@...> wrote:
        > I'm in the process of starting a podcast and am thinking about getting
        > one of those Giant Squid Audio stereo lavailers for doing interviews
        > on the street and such. I've heard great things about this mic and
        > I've heard the demos on the GSA website, but I'm wondering if anyone
        > uses this mic themselves or knows of a podcast that does? It'd be
        > great to hear it in real-world use.

        Here's a collection of field interviews I did with the Giant Squid
        stereo omni a little over a year ago:

        http://escapepod.org/2006/08/30/ep-interview-worldcon-survey/

        I've also recorded a number of panels with it at various conventions;
        if you search the archives for the Balticon podcast or Podcamp Atlanta
        you can probably find some, though I'm not sure what's still available
        right now or how well it's notated who recorded what.

        It's a great portable mic, and extremely versatile. If you only have
        the money for one mic and you know you'll be doing field interviews
        more than half the time, the Giant Squid and a small recorder (such as
        the Zoom H2 or, much cheaper, an old iRiver 700/800 series off of
        eBay) is a great place to start.



        > About my main mic: I have a dynamic handheld mic that I bought a few
        > years ago (a Shure PG something-or-other) that I was thinking of
        > using. I'm sure it would be fine. But I've heard that condenser mics
        > sound 10 times better, so I'm thinking about picking up an inexpensive
        > model. Is anyone using either of the cheap Marshalls--either the 990
        > or the V57M?

        Condensers don't always sound better; there are excellent dynamic
        microphones out there. Condensers are _usually_ more sensitive, but
        that can also be a downside if room noise is an issue.

        That said, the MXL-990 is a great microphone for the price and almost
        certainly better than your PG. The PG series is the cheapest end of
        what Shure makes, and they're really mediocre in my opinion; the Shure
        SM57 and SM58 is where they get their reputation for good dynamics.
        Remember, though, that if you use a condenser microphone you need a
        mixer or recorder that offers phantom power, or you won't get any
        sound.


        --
        Have Fun,
        Steve Eley (sfeley@...)
        ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
        http://www.escapepod.org
      • Richard Amirault
        ... From: Stephen Eley (snip) ... Depends on how you define phantom power . The Giant Squid mic mentioned is certainly a condenser mic .. but it doesn t
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 1, 2008
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          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Stephen Eley"
          (snip)
          > Remember, though, that if you use a condenser microphone you need a
          > mixer or recorder that offers phantom power, or you won't get any
          > sound.

          Depends on how you define "phantom power". The Giant Squid mic mentioned is
          certainly a condenser mic .. but it doesn't require 48v phantom power .. it
          uses "plug-in" power which is considerablly lower in voltage.

          But, yes, any condenser mic will need power. Either an internal battery or
          from an outside source.

          Richard Amirault
          Boston, MA, USA
          http://n1jdu.org
          http://bostonfandom.org
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7hf9u2ZdlQ
        • Stephen Eley
          ... Yes, but in the paragraph I was directly responding to there, he was no longer talking about the Giant Squid. He was asking about a couple of studio
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 1, 2008
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            On Jan 1, 2008 7:44 PM, Richard Amirault <ramirault@...> wrote:
            >
            > Depends on how you define "phantom power". The Giant Squid mic mentioned is
            > certainly a condenser mic .. but it doesn't require 48v phantom power .. it
            > uses "plug-in" power which is considerablly lower in voltage.

            Yes, but in the paragraph I was directly responding to there, he was
            no longer talking about the Giant Squid. He was asking about a couple
            of studio condensers.



            --
            Have Fun,
            Steve Eley (sfeley@...)
            ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
            http://www.escapepod.org
          • Shawn Thorpe
            ... I have used that same Giant Squid mic with my iRiver 795 to make these podcast recordings: http://shawnogram.com/2007/12/16/used-to-work-in-a-casino/ And
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 1, 2008
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              On Dec 31, 2007 4:41 PM, Blasterbot5555 <blasterbot5555@...> wrote:

              > I'm in the process of starting a podcast and am thinking about getting
              > one of those Giant Squid Audio stereo lavailers for doing interviews
              > on the street and such. I've heard great things about this mic and
              > I've heard the demos on the GSA website, but I'm wondering if anyone
              > uses this mic themselves or knows of a podcast that does? It'd be
              > great to hear it in real-world use.
              >
              > The mic I'm looking at is here:
              > http://www.giant-squid-audio-lab.com/gs/gs-podcast_stereo.html
              >
              > About my main mic: I have a dynamic handheld mic that I bought a few
              > years ago (a Shure PG something-or-other) that I was thinking of
              > using. I'm sure it would be fine. But I've heard that condenser mics
              > sound 10 times better, so I'm thinking about picking up an inexpensive
              > model. Is anyone using either of the cheap Marshalls--either the 990
              > or the V57M?
              >
              >
              > .
              >

              I have used that same Giant Squid mic with my iRiver 795 to make these
              podcast recordings:
              http://shawnogram.com/2007/12/16/used-to-work-in-a-casino/
              And everything on this page:
              http://shawnogram.com/category/audio-podcast/page/5/
              I think the performance of the mic is quite good in the field. Wouldn't use
              it in the studio.

              --
              -Shawn "Shawno Gordo" Thorpe
              Hyper Nonsense - Talk/comedy podcast from central California
              http://www.hypernonsense.com/

              Shawnogram - Content = life.
              http://www.shawnogram.com/

              Phantom Power Media - Bloggy, podcasty
              http://www.phantompower.org/


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • David Smith
              True enough. A condensor mic is basically a capacitor, with one plate of the capacitor (effectively) connected to a plate that catches audio sound vibrations,
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 2, 2008
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                True enough. A condensor mic is basically a capacitor, with one plate of
                the capacitor (effectively) connected to a plate that catches audio sound
                vibrations, which causes that plate to vibrate, which causes a variation
                of the capacity between the plates of the condensor -- the space between
                the plates varies the overall capacitance.

                Add some batteries, and that variable capacitor is varying the fraction of
                a substantial voltage available to the output. So from a small-amplitude
                input, you're recording a fairly-large-volume, filtered DC output that
                reproduces your audio.

                But you need the voltage to make that small volume of varying capacity
                into a large volume, varying voltage.

                It was 1 Jan 2008, when Richard Amirault commented:


                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: "Stephen Eley"
                > (snip)
                > > Remember, though, that if you use a condenser microphone you need a
                > > mixer or recorder that offers phantom power, or you won't get any
                > > sound.
                >
                > Depends on how you define "phantom power". The Giant Squid mic mentioned
                > is certainly a condenser mic .. but it doesn't require 48v phantom power ..
                > it uses "plug-in" power which is considerablly lower in voltage.
                >
                > But, yes, any condenser mic will need power. Either an internal battery or
                > from an outside source.
                >
                > Richard Amirault
                > Boston, MA, USA
                > http://n1jdu.org
                > http://bostonfandom.org
                > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7hf9u2ZdlQ
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >

                --
                Grizzly's Growls
                The Life and Times of a Minor Local Celebrity
                Podcast: <http://grizzly.libsyn.com>
                Listen or Subscribe:
                <http://feeds.feedburner.com/grizzlysgrowls>
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