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Re: Podcasting for clients: handling the review process?

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  • G
    For the Jim Henson Company Podcast, I always run my questions past the company rep before the interview/recording. Then the rep usually sits in on the
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 5, 2007
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      For the Jim Henson Company Podcast, I always run my questions past the company rep
      before the interview/recording. Then the rep usually sits in on the interview and if any new
      thoughts on questions arise they are taken care of then.

      Afterwards, I edit the audio and send it in for a review. I usually get a few notes and tweaks,
      but once those are done I don't have to send it in for a re-review I just send it to the web guy
      for inclusion on the website. Having the rep in on the question process really cuts down on
      the revisions at the end.
    • Mike
      One of the voice over groups (I can t recall which one) allow their clients to be on Skype while they are editing. So they can hear it as it is getting edited.
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 5, 2007
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        One of the voice over groups (I can't recall which one) allow their clients
        to be on Skype while they are editing. So they can hear it as it is getting
        edited. Might be another idea.

        On 9/5/07, G <grant@...> wrote:
        >
        > For the Jim Henson Company Podcast, I always run my questions past the
        > company rep
        > before the interview/recording. Then the rep usually sits in on the
        > interview and if any new
        > thoughts on questions arise they are taken care of then.
        >
        > Afterwards, I edit the audio and send it in for a review. I usually get a
        > few notes and tweaks,
        > but once those are done I don't have to send it in for a re-review I just
        > send it to the web guy
        > for inclusion on the website. Having the rep in on the question process
        > really cuts down on
        > the revisions at the end.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >


        --
        Mike Wills
        http://www.linkedin.com/in/mikewills
        Blog - http://mikewills.name
        Podcasts - http://podcastmike.com


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Wade Rockett
        Thanks for all of the suggestions! It sounds as if the most important thing is to manage the client s expectations up front, and your answers are sparking some
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 7, 2007
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          Thanks for all of the suggestions! It sounds as if the most important
          thing is to manage the client's expectations up front, and your
          answers are sparking some ideas about how to do that. I appreciate the
          help.


          --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, "Wade Rockett" <wade@...> wrote:
          >
          > If you've ever produced podcasts for clients, where you take
          > a lot of raw audio and edit it down into one short episode, could you
          > please share how you handled the client review cycle?
        • insytworks
          I begin during the recording process. I invite the exec s handler to the recording session to provide any guidance on clarity or redos. As we get to the
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 9, 2007
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            I begin during the recording process. I invite the exec's "handler"
            to the recording session to provide any guidance on clarity
            or "redos." As we get to the end of the conversation, I make sure
            there is an opportunity for those "redos" or clarifications. I also
            ask if there is anything they have concerns about and might not want
            in the final version. Then I edit to a "draft version" for review.
            I stress in my communications to let me know if there is anything
            they would like me to "take out." This way, when I "take out" those
            snippets, there will be no surprises in what is left. I add intro,
            music, and such and send it straight to the I.T. guy for posting.

            Since I'm doing an internal corp. podcast, I don't have the contracts
            like Todd, but I will remember his points as I think they are right
            on.

            Robin

            --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, "Wade Rockett" <wade@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi, all. If you've ever produced podcasts for clients, where you
            take
            > a lot of raw audio and edit it down into one short episode, could
            you
            > please share how you handled the client review cycle?
            >
            > I'm envisioning sending them an episode and having them come back
            > with, "Did John Smith mention how awesome Feature X of our product
            was
            > when you talked to him? What about Features Y and Z? Get that in
            > there." or "We'd like to bring out the competitive angle of this
            story
            > more." (In this scenario there's no going back and getting another
            > interview.)
            >
            > It seems like you'd always be in danger of burning through your
            > budgeted hours this way. Not sure how best to head that off, though.
            > Any ideas or advice?
            >
            > One suggestion was to give the client a transcript of the raw audio
            > first, with the parts we intend to include highlighted.
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Wade
            >
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