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Re: Re: [podcasters] Constant buzzing noise when using condenser microphone

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  • Stephen Eley
    ... I always record with the lights off. Partly for noise reasons, and partly because it makes reading from the LCD monitor that much easier. -- Have Fun,
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 1, 2006
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      On 12/1/06, Kraemer Advertising <craigk@...> wrote:
      > For what it is worth, I just had a situation where I had a low level buzz
      > and I was running on battery power. When I turned off the florescent lights
      > the buzz went away. Don't know if there was a connection or not.

      I always record with the lights off. Partly for noise reasons, and
      partly because it makes reading from the LCD monitor that much easier.

      --
      Have Fun,
      Steve Eley (sfeley@...)
      ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
      http://www.escapepod.org
    • Michael Mennenga
      Florescent lights run at very high voltages and require transformers that sometimes emit a low level EMF (Electro-magnetic Field) If your condenser mic is in
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 1, 2006
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        Florescent lights run at very high voltages and require transformers
        that sometimes emit a low level EMF (Electro-magnetic Field) If your
        condenser mic is in just the right spot, and it has less than stellar
        shielding, it will pick up this field and generate a buzz.

        Ground loops would have been my first thought, but the nature of
        florescent lighting is very much a factor.

        Since shutting off the lights solved the problem, this would move to the
        top on my list.

        --
        Michael R. Mennenga

        Director of Technical Operations
        Farpoint Media
        www.farpointmedia.net

        Host of Dragon Page, Slice of Scifi and Wingin' It!
        www.dragonpage.com
        www.sliceofscifi.com
        www.michaelandevo.com
      • Shawn Thorpe
        I connected the mic to my Fender powered mixer/P.A. and monitored it there. No buzzing. I guess my next step will be to research the ground loop angle and see
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 1, 2006
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          I connected the mic to my Fender powered mixer/P.A. and monitored it there.
          No buzzing.

          I guess my next step will be to research the ground loop angle and see what
          I come up with. Thanks to everyone for your suggestions.

          -Shawn

          On 12/1/06, Stephen Eley <SFEley@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > I'd have suspected the microphone first, actually. How did you rule it
          > out?
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Lorne Ipsum
          ... there. ... see what ... Shawn -- FYI, I downloaded your MP3 file, deleted everything that wasn t background (basically, your voice), and did a spectral
          Message 4 of 13 , Dec 2, 2006
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            --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, "Shawn Thorpe" <shawnogordo@...> wrote:
            >
            > I connected the mic to my Fender powered mixer/P.A. and monitored it
            there.
            > No buzzing.
            >
            > I guess my next step will be to research the ground loop angle and
            see what
            > I come up with. Thanks to everyone for your suggestions.
            >

            Shawn -- FYI, I downloaded your MP3 file, deleted everything that
            wasn't background (basically, your voice), and did a spectral analysis
            on the buzz.

            It's 120 Hz, and various harmonics (multiples) of it.

            If this was strictly a ground loop problem, I'd have expected more 60
            Hz in the noise. So my guess is that you're picking up noise from
            something else (or maybe your mixer is). When you did your test with
            the Fender, were you in the same room as for the original (buzzy)
            recording? Did you have the same lights on?

            Lorne
            -----------------------------------------------------------------
            Lorne Ipsum
            Chief Geek, Geek Counterpoint blog & podcast
            http://geekcounterpoint.net
          • Paul Puri
            ... I too tried to eliminate the sound using a standard 50 and 60Hz bandwidth eliminator, without any results. So I tried different frequencies and eventually
            Message 5 of 13 , Dec 2, 2006
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              On 12/2/06, Lorne Ipsum <lorne@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > It's 120 Hz, and various harmonics (multiples) of it.
              >
              > If this was strictly a ground loop problem, I'd have expected more 60
              > Hz in the noise. So my guess is that you're picking up noise from
              > something else (or maybe your mixer is). When you did your test with
              > the Fender, were you in the same room as for the original (buzzy)
              > recording? Did you have the same lights on?


              I too tried to eliminate the sound using a standard 50 and 60Hz bandwidth
              eliminator, without any results. So I tried different frequencies and
              eventually was able to get rid of it around 120Hz. So it is not your garden
              variety hum.


              Paul Puri

              Listen to Podcasts. No iPod necessary!
              The Podcast Guild Planning Committee.
              http://podcastguild.com/

              The Official Podcasters Wiki: http://podcasterswiki.com

              Promotion without shame.
              Podcasting Announcements
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/podcastingannouncements/


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Steven Taylor
              Any power supply that uses a full wave rectifier will produce a ripple frqequency of 120Hz. If the power supply does not have adequate filtering, it will allow
              Message 6 of 13 , Dec 2, 2006
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                Any power supply that uses a full wave rectifier will produce a ripple
                frqequency of 120Hz. If the power supply does not have adequate filtering,
                it will allow that 120Hz to get into the rest of the system. It will then
                get picked up and amplified by any circuits that don't have a good power
                suplpy rejection ratio. That's why 120Hz noise is actually quite common.

                Steve Taylor

                On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 09:10:23 -0800, Paul Puri <paulpuri@...> wrote:

                > On 12/2/06, Lorne Ipsum <lorne@...> wrote:
                >>
                >>
                >> It's 120 Hz, and various harmonics (multiples) of it.
                >>
                >> If this was strictly a ground loop problem, I'd have expected more 60
                >> Hz in the noise. So my guess is that you're picking up noise from
                >> something else (or maybe your mixer is). When you did your test with
                >> the Fender, were you in the same room as for the original (buzzy)
                >> recording? Did you have the same lights on?
                >
                >
                > I too tried to eliminate the sound using a standard 50 and 60Hz bandwidth
                > eliminator, without any results. So I tried different frequencies and
                > eventually was able to get rid of it around 120Hz. So it is not your
                > garden
                > variety hum.
                >
                >
                > Paul Puri
                >
                > Listen to Podcasts. No iPod necessary!
                > The Podcast Guild Planning Committee.
                > http://podcastguild.com/
                >
                > The Official Podcasters Wiki: http://podcasterswiki.com
                >
                > Promotion without shame.
                > Podcasting Announcements
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/podcastingannouncements/
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >



                --
                Using M2, Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/
              • Shawn Thorpe
                I did test it with the Fender mixer in a different room from where I have the computer. But I ve also tested the Multimix in the same room as the Fender. The
                Message 7 of 13 , Dec 2, 2006
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                  I did test it with the Fender mixer in a different room from where I have
                  the computer. But I've also tested the Multimix in the same room as the
                  Fender. The buzzing was still there. One of the nice things about the
                  Multimix is that it can operate as a stand-alone mixer. So, I can test it
                  out just about anywhere. All I need is an electrical outlet, the microphone
                  and my headphones. And everywhere I've hooked it up, I've had the same
                  problem. I suppose that there's still a chance it could be the microphone,
                  and this is the only condenser mic I have. I'm going to contact some local
                  music shops today to see if they'd be willing to let me connect one of their
                  condensers to the mixer. My ideal goal is to eliminate the mixer itself as
                  being the problem. If either the power in my home or my microphone are the
                  problem, then I can take some action. If the problem is indeed with the
                  mixer, I'll have to send it in again for service. I'd like to avoid that if
                  possible.

                  Thanks to Lorne and Paul for their help in this matter.

                  -Shawn

                  On 12/2/06, Lorne Ipsum <lorne@...> wrote:

                  > Shawn -- FYI, I downloaded your MP3 file, deleted everything that
                  > wasn't background (basically, your voice), and did a spectral analysis
                  > on the buzz.
                  >
                  > It's 120 Hz, and various harmonics (multiples) of it.
                  >
                  > If this was strictly a ground loop problem, I'd have expected more 60
                  > Hz in the noise. So my guess is that you're picking up noise from
                  > something else (or maybe your mixer is). When you did your test with
                  > the Fender, were you in the same room as for the original (buzzy)
                  > recording? Did you have the same lights on?
                  >
                  > Lorne
                  > ----------------------------------------------------------
                  > Lorne Ipsum
                  > Chief Geek, Geek Counterpoint blog & podcast
                  > http://geekcounterpoint.net
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Shawn Thorpe
                  The problem turned out to be the microphone. I took the whole rig (except for the computer) to a local music store and tried it with a different microphone.
                  Message 8 of 13 , Dec 3, 2006
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                    The problem turned out to be the microphone. I took the whole rig (except
                    for the computer) to a local music store and tried it with a different
                    microphone. The new mic (which I eventually purchased) sounded nice and
                    clear. The old mic still buzzed like an angry swarm of bees. I've also now
                    tested the new microphone out at home, and it still sounds fine.

                    So it seems this mystery has been solved. Thanks again to everyone for the
                    help.

                    -Shawn

                    On 12/2/06, Steven Taylor <steven.taylor56@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Any power supply that uses a full wave rectifier will produce a ripple
                    > frqequency of 120Hz. If the power supply does not have adequate filtering,
                    > it will allow that 120Hz to get into the rest of the system. It will then
                    > get picked up and amplified by any circuits that don't have a good power
                    > suplpy rejection ratio. That's why 120Hz noise is actually quite common.
                    >
                    > Steve Taylor
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Stephen Eley
                    ... (*Steve licks tip of index finger; makes downward motion in air*) 8- Seriously, glad you got it figured out. That s the kind of frustration that drives
                    Message 9 of 13 , Dec 3, 2006
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                      On 12/3/06, Shawn Thorpe <shawnogordo@...> wrote:
                      > The problem turned out to be the microphone.


                      (*Steve licks tip of index finger; makes downward motion in air*) >8->


                      Seriously, glad you got it figured out. That's the kind of
                      frustration that drives people insane. Soon you'd be losing sleep,
                      then refusing to eat or drink... Finally you'd be calling into talk
                      radio shows. It isn't pretty.

                      --
                      Have Fun,
                      Steve Eley (sfeley@...)
                      ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
                      http://www.escapepod.org
                    • Shawn Thorpe
                      I was actually getting pretty depressed over it. I was riding the bus to the music store, with all of my gear stuffed into my bag, expecting the worst. I m
                      Message 10 of 13 , Dec 3, 2006
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                        I was actually getting pretty depressed over it. I was riding the bus to
                        the music store, with all of my gear stuffed into my bag, expecting the
                        worst. I'm glad now that I know the problem was the microhone. But I'm
                        disappointed that I spent shipping money ($16.00 for UPS Ground) to send the
                        mixer in for service. Not to mention the downtime in production. Lesson
                        learned. I really am glad for the suggestions that people made through this
                        group. If it hadn't been for you guys, I would've purchased a power
                        conditioner, and that wouldn't have done anything to fix the problem.

                        -Shawn

                        On 12/3/06, Stephen Eley <SFEley@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > On 12/3/06, Shawn Thorpe <shawnogordo@...<shawnogordo%40gmail.com>>
                        > wrote:
                        > > The problem turned out to be the microphone.
                        >
                        > (*Steve licks tip of index finger; makes downward motion in air*) >8->
                        >
                        > Seriously, glad you got it figured out. That's the kind of
                        > frustration that drives people insane. Soon you'd be losing sleep,
                        > then refusing to eat or drink... Finally you'd be calling into talk
                        > radio shows. It isn't pretty.
                        >
                        > --
                        > Have Fun,
                        > Steve Eley (sfeley@... <sfeley%40gmail.com>)
                        > ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
                        > http://www.escapepod.org
                        >
                        >


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