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  • sully2001ca
    Hi guys and gals. I ve been reading along for a couple of days now, and thought I d drop a post in for those of you who ve got on-air talent and content ready
    Message 1 of 12 , May 2 6:33 AM
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      Hi guys and gals. I've been reading along for a couple of days now, and
      thought I'd drop a post in for those of you who've got on-air talent and
      content ready to go but haven't gotten hosting together yet.

      MediaBlog ( http://mediablog.mail2web.com/
      <http://mediablog.mail2web.com/> ) is a beginner-friendly free podcast
      hosting service that allows for unlimited diskspace and bandwidth usage,
      as well as automatic XML/RSS podcast feed creation. Just upload your
      podcast content, add your automatically generated XML/RSS feed to iTunes
      and watch as your audience starts to tune in! Well, theoretically at
      least. :)

      For the sake of completeness, MediaBlog also includes integrated
      blogging and media gallery services in order to better flesh out your
      podcast experience for your listeners.

      Okay, that's about enough of the canned pitch - now a question of my
      own, if nobody minds. Speaking as someone who's gotten extremely
      interested in podcasting over the last couple of months while I've been
      reading along about the monetization of podcasting on the
      bandwidth/storage provider end of things. Inserting ads at the beginning
      of podcasted files, tagging the end of podcast descriptions with an ad,
      leaving it to banner ads on the podcast homepages and hoping people
      click back to view them, etc. What are the actual success stories out
      there? We haven't quite generated the head of steam in podcast traffic
      to properly test the various systems.

      That's all from me - thanks again for reading everyone. If you've got
      any questions, comments, criticisms etc. about the service - please post
      a reply or let me know personally ( sully AT softcom DOT biz ). Thanks
      again.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Stephen Eley
      ... So... You re giving away unlimited bandwidth and disk space, and hoping that over time a revenue model will become apparent? That s very generous of you!
      Message 2 of 12 , May 2 6:58 AM
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        On 5/2/06, sully2001ca <sullys@...> wrote:
        >
        > Okay, that's about enough of the canned pitch - now a question of my
        > own, if nobody minds. Speaking as someone who's gotten extremely
        > interested in podcasting over the last couple of months while I've been
        > reading along about the monetization of podcasting on the
        > bandwidth/storage provider end of things. Inserting ads at the beginning
        > of podcasted files, tagging the end of podcast descriptions with an ad,
        > leaving it to banner ads on the podcast homepages and hoping people
        > click back to view them, etc. What are the actual success stories out
        > there? We haven't quite generated the head of steam in podcast traffic
        > to properly test the various systems.

        So... You're giving away unlimited bandwidth and disk space, and
        hoping that over time a revenue model will become apparent?

        That's very generous of you! >8->

        In all seriousness, though, I don't think an ad model that's
        site-driven (i.e., visual ads in the podcast's supporting site) is a
        natural or successful way to support multimedia. When the form
        fulfills its intent, podcast subscribers are catching the media files
        automatically and may forget that the podcast *has* a site. Driving
        them back to it isn't subscriber-friendly.

        Audio ads in the podcast itself make more sense, but are also
        perceived as more disruptive, and require more individual care (and
        therefore cost) to produce and integrate them. They're not easy to
        sell yet, either.

        So I'm afraid there are no easy answers at this time. If you can find
        one, more power to you -- it'll be huge advantage to you to be one of
        the first ones implementing it before the rush of free unlimited
        podcast providers. >8->

        --
        Have Fun,
        Steve Eley (sfeley@...)
        ESCAPE POD - The Science Fiction Podcast Magazine
        http://www.escapepod.org
      • sully2001ca
        ... been ... beginning ... ad, ... out ... traffic ... Haha. Well, at this point I had better mention that the company developing MediaBlog also runs
        Message 3 of 12 , May 2 8:22 AM
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          --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen Eley" <SFEley@...> wrote:
          >
          > On 5/2/06, sully2001ca sullys@... wrote:
          > >
          > > Okay, that's about enough of the canned pitch - now a question of my
          > > own, if nobody minds. Speaking as someone who's gotten extremely
          > > interested in podcasting over the last couple of months while I've
          been
          > > reading along about the monetization of podcasting on the
          > > bandwidth/storage provider end of things. Inserting ads at the
          beginning
          > > of podcasted files, tagging the end of podcast descriptions with an
          ad,
          > > leaving it to banner ads on the podcast homepages and hoping people
          > > click back to view them, etc. What are the actual success stories
          out
          > > there? We haven't quite generated the head of steam in podcast
          traffic
          > > to properly test the various systems.
          >
          > So... You're giving away unlimited bandwidth and disk space, and
          > hoping that over time a revenue model will become apparent?
          >
          > That's very generous of you! >8->
          >
          > In all seriousness, though, I don't think an ad model that's
          > site-driven (i.e., visual ads in the podcast's supporting site) is a
          > natural or successful way to support multimedia. When the form
          > fulfills its intent, podcast subscribers are catching the media files
          > automatically and may forget that the podcast *has* a site. Driving
          > them back to it isn't subscriber-friendly.
          >
          > Audio ads in the podcast itself make more sense, but are also
          > perceived as more disruptive, and require more individual care (and
          > therefore cost) to produce and integrate them. They're not easy to
          > sell yet, either.
          >
          > So I'm afraid there are no easy answers at this time. If you can find
          > one, more power to you -- it'll be huge advantage to you to be one of
          > the first ones implementing it before the rush of free unlimited
          > podcast providers. >8->

          Haha. Well, at this point I had better mention that the company
          developing MediaBlog also runs myhosting.com and mail2web.com - so
          longevity and the provision of free services is nothing new here. The
          "wait and see and pray" revenue model isn't too worrisome for us (yet),
          and there's even a case for it to be made when you consider that sites
          like YouTube.com are now spending over $1 million a month in bandwidth
          costs alone. That's just one example. Will they survive or collapse?
          Many of us are waiting and watching with avid interest.

          I've been thinking about the site ad model and I too think there may not
          be much merit in it. It sometimes depends on the content and/or type of
          podcast, though. If the podcast is sort of an auxilary thing that gets
          people who hit upon it in iTunes interested enough to become regular
          blog readers, that's a win. But that will likely be a rarity.

          Audio ads should prove interesting. I sort of think that a fairly short
          ad (10 seconds or less) would almost be seen positively, they add a
          sense of legitimacy to the podcast ("everyone who's someone has a
          sponsor"). The logistics of lining up targetted ad sponsors
          (non-targetted would probably be easier but less lucrative), hmm. A lot
          of legwork needs to be done.
        • robert
          ... What a load of crap. Sorry - usually I am not negative - but to say that listeners will judge the value of a podcast - by whether it has an audio
          Message 4 of 12 , May 2 8:51 AM
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            > everyone who's someone has a
            > sponsor"

            What a load of crap.

            Sorry - usually I am not negative - but to say that listeners will
            judge the value of a podcast - by whether it has an audio commercial
            is at the least laughable.

            "Gee I really like 5 minutes with Wichita, but because he does not
            have any advertising, it must be second rate"

            I do not think so.

            I am not saying people should not have advertising in their podcasts
            - that is a personal choice for the host to make. But to suggest
            that Advertising will legitimize the podcast in some manner - that is
            just not the case. Some podcasters are really have no intention of
            selling 10 or 30 seconds of their audiences life to some sponsor.

            Let me through out this equally ridiculous thought

            "Well because they do not have a sponsor they must be doing it for
            the love of it and that means their podcast will have more passion
            and substance."


            Rob W
            podCast411




            On May 2, 2006, at 10:22 AM, sully2001ca wrote:


            >
            > Audio ads should prove interesting. I sort of think that a fairly
            > short
            > ad (10 seconds or less) would almost be seen positively, they add a
            > sense of legitimacy to the podcast ("everyone who's someone has a
            > sponsor"). The logistics of lining up targetted ad sponsors
            > (non-targetted would probably be easier but less lucrative), hmm. A
            > lot
            > of legwork needs to be done.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Evo Terra
            ... Where do you get these goofy ideas from, Walch? Everyone knows that love and passion are simply figments of the imagination. I can t touch love and
            Message 5 of 12 , May 2 9:12 AM
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              robert wrote:
              > Let me through out this equally ridiculous thought
              >
              > "Well because they do not have a sponsor they must be doing it for
              > the love of it and that means their podcast will have more passion
              > and substance."

              Where do you get these goofy ideas from, Walch? Everyone knows that love
              and passion are simply figments of the imagination. I can't touch love
              and passion, but I can touch money. Ergo, money is more important.

              Hey, I heard Podcast411 was being acquired by Clear Channel.

              (Oh, and for the slower sect </sarcasm>)

              E.

              --
              Evo Terra | DragonPage.com | SliceofSciFi.com
            • George L Smyth
              ... Well, with $11 million in VC funding, they ve got 10 months to come up with something or get bought - less time if they become more popular. This sort of
              Message 6 of 12 , May 2 9:52 AM
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                --- sully2001ca <sullys@...> wrote:

                > Haha. Well, at this point I had better mention that the company
                > developing MediaBlog also runs myhosting.com and mail2web.com - so
                > longevity and the provision of free services is nothing new here. The
                > "wait and see and pray" revenue model isn't too worrisome for us (yet),
                > and there's even a case for it to be made when you consider that sites
                > like YouTube.com are now spending over $1 million a month in bandwidth
                > costs alone. That's just one example. Will they survive or collapse?
                > Many of us are waiting and watching with avid interest.

                Well, with $11 million in VC funding, they've got 10 months to come up with
                something or get bought - less time if they become more popular. This sort of
                thing is the thought process I remember in the last 90's and we can count the
                number of companies that started this way then that still exist today. I think
                that the example of Yahoo buying Flickr, which probably has comparable
                bandwidth costs, is important to all companies considering this, and does not
                bode well for anyone.

                Just my opinion, but starting something and hoping for a business model to
                somehow appear later on is not a prudent way of doing things.

                Cheers -

                george

                -------------------------------------

                Eclectic Mix: http://EclecticMix.com
                DRiP Investing: http://DRiPInvesting.org
                Handmade Photographic Images: http://www.GLSmyth.com
                One Minute How-To: http://podcasternews.com/details.php?P=131
              • Melissa Anelli
                Talk to the LibSyn fellows, who aren t offering unlimited storage, but do offer unlimited bandwidth, and they are operating under notmuchmoney but all the
                Message 7 of 12 , May 2 10:00 AM
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                  Talk to the LibSyn fellows, who aren't offering unlimited storage, but do
                  offer unlimited bandwidth, and they are operating under notmuchmoney but all
                  the passion that makes them so cool. Gah, you'd think they paid me or
                  something, but I really, really just love the service. But I can't imagine
                  how this could fly with no restrictions, not yet anyway...

                  m
                  www.pottercast.com


                  On 5/2/06, George L Smyth <glsmyth@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > --- sully2001ca <sullys@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > > Haha. Well, at this point I had better mention that the company
                  > > developing MediaBlog also runs myhosting.com and mail2web.com - so
                  > > longevity and the provision of free services is nothing new here. The
                  > > "wait and see and pray" revenue model isn't too worrisome for us (yet),
                  > > and there's even a case for it to be made when you consider that sites
                  > > like YouTube.com are now spending over $1 million a month in bandwidth
                  > > costs alone. That's just one example. Will they survive or collapse?
                  > > Many of us are waiting and watching with avid interest.
                  >
                  > Well, with $11 million in VC funding, they've got 10 months to come up
                  > with
                  > something or get bought - less time if they become more popular. This
                  > sort of
                  > thing is the thought process I remember in the last 90's and we can count
                  > the
                  > number of companies that started this way then that still exist today. I
                  > think
                  > that the example of Yahoo buying Flickr, which probably has comparable
                  > bandwidth costs, is important to all companies considering this, and does
                  > not
                  > bode well for anyone.
                  >
                  > Just my opinion, but starting something and hoping for a business model to
                  > somehow appear later on is not a prudent way of doing things.
                  >
                  > Cheers -
                  >
                  > george
                  >
                  > -------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Eclectic Mix: http://EclecticMix.com
                  > DRiP Investing: http://DRiPInvesting.org
                  > Handmade Photographic Images: http://www.GLSmyth.com
                  > One Minute How-To: http://podcasternews.com/details.php?P=131
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • sully2001ca
                  I tend to think there s some validity to the idea. The championing of ideological purity in podcasts aside, I would bet that many listeners would view, say, a
                  Message 8 of 12 , May 2 10:01 AM
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                    I tend to think there's some validity to the idea. The championing of
                    ideological purity in podcasts aside, I would bet that many listeners
                    would view, say, a mid-podcast tip to one's sponsor (a la Diggnation) as
                    a sign that that podcast has "made it big".

                    As grossly capitalistic as it may sound, people do often place some
                    positive bias towards what's "big". At a glance, would I subscribe to
                    GameSpot's HotSpot for gaming news, or Bob's Weekly Gaming Show? You
                    tell me - only one of those two are often in the iTunes top 20 podcasts.

                    --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, robert <news@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > > everyone who's someone has a
                    > > sponsor"
                    >
                    > What a load of crap.
                    >
                    > Sorry - usually I am not negative - but to say that listeners will
                    > judge the value of a podcast - by whether it has an audio commercial
                    > is at the least laughable.
                    >
                    > "Gee I really like 5 minutes with Wichita, but because he does not
                    > have any advertising, it must be second rate"
                    >
                    > I do not think so.
                    >
                    > I am not saying people should not have advertising in their podcasts
                    > - that is a personal choice for the host to make. But to suggest
                    > that Advertising will legitimize the podcast in some manner - that is
                    > just not the case. Some podcasters are really have no intention of
                    > selling 10 or 30 seconds of their audiences life to some sponsor.
                    >
                    > Let me through out this equally ridiculous thought
                    >
                    > "Well because they do not have a sponsor they must be doing it for
                    > the love of it and that means their podcast will have more passion
                    > and substance."
                    >
                    >
                    > Rob W
                    > podCast411
                    >
                    > On May 2, 2006, at 10:22 AM, sully2001ca wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > >
                    > > Audio ads should prove interesting. I sort of think that a fairly
                    > > short
                    > > ad (10 seconds or less) would almost be seen positively, they add a
                    > > sense of legitimacy to the podcast ("everyone who's someone has a
                    > > sponsor"). The logistics of lining up targetted ad sponsors
                    > > (non-targetted would probably be easier but less lucrative), hmm. A
                    > > lot
                    > > of legwork needs to be done.
                  • sully2001ca
                    It is rather reminiscent of the bad old years, isn t it? To expand on the YouTube scenario, there s a certain dangerous logic in what they re doing. Something
                    Message 9 of 12 , May 2 10:11 AM
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                      It is rather reminiscent of the bad old years, isn't it? To expand on
                      the YouTube scenario, there's a certain dangerous logic in what they're
                      doing. Something like:

                      1. Get popular.
                      2. Build that popularity to a critical mass.
                      3. Spend every waking minute that you're not spending managing
                      hardware/bandwidth issues lining up sponsors for advertisements.
                      4. With the last penny about the leave the company coffers, put on ads.
                      Hopefully at this point, your community is entrenched enough that while
                      the complaints will be numerous, the number of people who stop visiting
                      should be minimal.
                      5. Go go advertising revenue!

                      I could name a lot of flaws with that plan right away, but it could
                      work. It's a little bit of a bait-and-switch and not something that
                      you'd ideally want to pursue, but a plan nonetheless. In any case, I'm
                      just a wee developer who's a little bit interested in business logic. :)
                      But it's fun to discuss.

                      Thanks,


                      Sully
                      MediaBlog <http://mediablog.mail2web.com/>

                      --- In podcasters@yahoogroups.com, George L Smyth <glsmyth@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > --- sully2001ca sullys@... wrote:
                      >
                      > > Haha. Well, at this point I had better mention that the company
                      > > developing MediaBlog also runs myhosting.com and mail2web.com - so
                      > > longevity and the provision of free services is nothing new here.
                      The
                      > > "wait and see and pray" revenue model isn't too worrisome for us
                      (yet),
                      > > and there's even a case for it to be made when you consider that
                      sites
                      > > like YouTube.com are now spending over $1 million a month in
                      bandwidth
                      > > costs alone. That's just one example. Will they survive or collapse?
                      > > Many of us are waiting and watching with avid interest.
                      >
                      > Well, with $11 million in VC funding, they've got 10 months to come up
                      with
                      > something or get bought - less time if they become more popular. This
                      sort of
                      > thing is the thought process I remember in the last 90's and we can
                      count the
                      > number of companies that started this way then that still exist today.
                      I think
                      > that the example of Yahoo buying Flickr, which probably has comparable
                      > bandwidth costs, is important to all companies considering this, and
                      does not
                      > bode well for anyone.
                      >
                      > Just my opinion, but starting something and hoping for a business
                      model to
                      > somehow appear later on is not a prudent way of doing things.
                      >
                      > Cheers -
                      >
                      > george
                      >
                      > -------------------------------------
                      >
                      > Eclectic Mix: http://EclecticMix.com
                      > DRiP Investing: http://DRiPInvesting.org
                      > Handmade Photographic Images: http://www.GLSmyth.com
                      > One Minute How-To: http://podcasternews.com/details.php?P=131
                      >



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Matt Kane's Brain
                      Flickr surely has income from premium memberships. Do they sell prints as well? There s another revenue stream. MySpace may be a money pit, but they are useful
                      Message 10 of 12 , May 2 10:16 AM
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                        Flickr surely has income from premium memberships. Do they sell
                        prints as well? There's another revenue stream.

                        MySpace may be a money pit, but they are useful for marketing their
                        new owners' wares.

                        So this new dot-com era is so far not TOTAL chaos. All the startups
                        around here are currently surviving on VC funding for now, but
                        actually have novelties like customers and revenue :)

                        On May 2, 2006, at 12:52, George L Smyth wrote:

                        > I think
                        > that the example of Yahoo buying Flickr, which probably has comparable
                        > bandwidth costs, is important to all companies considering this,
                        > and does not
                        > bode well for anyone.

                        --
                        matt kane's brain
                        http://hydrogenproject.com
                        aim -> mkbatwerk || mkbwriu
                        mkb@...
                      • George L Smyth
                        Matt - Well, there s more than just the cost of the bandwidth with flickr, there s maintenance and the cost of acquisition. I think the cost was around $30
                        Message 11 of 12 , May 3 9:56 AM
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                          Matt -

                          Well, there's more than just the cost of the bandwidth with flickr, there's
                          maintenance and the cost of acquisition. I think the cost was around $30
                          million, so that's one heck of a lot of premium memberships and prints before
                          they can get back to zero.

                          Yahoo's Annual Report doesn't break out the flickr operational costs, so one
                          can only speculate. Since flickr is only a small slice of Yahoo, one cannot
                          point to their problems in a single direction, but when I look at an
                          acquisition like this and see a negative earnings growth rate of more than 20%
                          then I can only say that they are not doing their shareholders any favors.

                          Cheers -

                          george


                          --- Matt Kane's Brain <mkb@...> wrote:

                          > Flickr surely has income from premium memberships. Do they sell
                          > prints as well? There's another revenue stream.
                          >
                          > MySpace may be a money pit, but they are useful for marketing their
                          > new owners' wares.
                          >
                          > So this new dot-com era is so far not TOTAL chaos. All the startups
                          > around here are currently surviving on VC funding for now, but
                          > actually have novelties like customers and revenue :)
                          >
                          > On May 2, 2006, at 12:52, George L Smyth wrote:
                          >
                          > > I think
                          > > that the example of Yahoo buying Flickr, which probably has comparable
                          > > bandwidth costs, is important to all companies considering this,
                          > > and does not
                          > > bode well for anyone.
                          >
                          > --
                          > matt kane's brain
                          > http://hydrogenproject.com
                          > aim -> mkbatwerk || mkbwriu
                          > mkb@...
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >


                          -------------------------------------

                          Eclectic Mix: http://EclecticMix.com
                          DRiP Investing: http://DRiPInvesting.org
                          Handmade Photographic Images: http://www.GLSmyth.com
                          One Minute How-To: http://podcasternews.com/details.php?P=131
                        • Matt Kane's Brain
                          If flickr can attract and support the number of users that MySpace has it won t be as big a deal. Does Flickr have ads? That counts for something. Yahoo may
                          Message 12 of 12 , May 3 10:17 AM
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                            If flickr can attract and support the number of users that MySpace
                            has it won't be as big a deal. Does Flickr have ads? That counts for
                            something.

                            Yahoo may want Flickr for something besides revenue, as well. Whether
                            Yahoo can effectively use whatever Flickr is offering them is, of
                            course, questionable.

                            On May 3, 2006, at 12:56, George L Smyth wrote:

                            > Matt -
                            >
                            > Well, there's more than just the cost of the bandwidth with flickr,
                            > there's
                            > maintenance and the cost of acquisition. I think the cost was
                            > around $30
                            > million, so that's one heck of a lot of premium memberships and
                            > prints before
                            > they can get back to zero.
                            >
                            > Yahoo's Annual Report doesn't break out the flickr operational
                            > costs, so one
                            > can only speculate. Since flickr is only a small slice of Yahoo,
                            > one cannot
                            > point to their problems in a single direction, but when I look at an
                            > acquisition like this and see a negative earnings growth rate of
                            > more than 20%
                            > then I can only say that they are not doing their shareholders any
                            > favors.
                            >
                            > Cheers -
                            >
                            > george
                            >
                            >
                            > --- Matt Kane's Brain <mkb@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >> Flickr surely has income from premium memberships. Do they sell
                            >> prints as well? There's another revenue stream.
                            >>
                            >> MySpace may be a money pit, but they are useful for marketing their
                            >> new owners' wares.
                            >>
                            >> So this new dot-com era is so far not TOTAL chaos. All the startups
                            >> around here are currently surviving on VC funding for now, but
                            >> actually have novelties like customers and revenue :)
                            >>
                            >> On May 2, 2006, at 12:52, George L Smyth wrote:
                            >>
                            >>> I think
                            >>> that the example of Yahoo buying Flickr, which probably has
                            >>> comparable
                            >>> bandwidth costs, is important to all companies considering this,
                            >>> and does not
                            >>> bode well for anyone.
                            >>
                            >> --
                            >> matt kane's brain
                            >> http://hydrogenproject.com
                            >> aim -> mkbatwerk || mkbwriu
                            >> mkb@...
                            >>
                            >>
                            >>
                            >>
                            >>
                            >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >>
                            >>
                            >>
                            >>
                            >>
                            >>
                            >>
                            >
                            >
                            > -------------------------------------
                            >
                            > Eclectic Mix: http://EclecticMix.com
                            > DRiP Investing: http://DRiPInvesting.org
                            > Handmade Photographic Images: http://www.GLSmyth.com
                            > One Minute How-To: http://podcasternews.com/details.php?P=131
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >

                            --
                            matt kane's brain
                            http://hydrogenproject.com
                            aim -> mkbatwerk || mkbwriu
                            mkb@...
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