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Re: Connecting computer to PC

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  • Dr. Bubba Gump
    Now I m getting really interested in trying this. The 1/8 jack on my laptop is a micraphone input - that should be about the same level as a turntable output.
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 29, 2008
      Now I'm getting really interested in trying this.

      The 1/8" jack on my laptop is a micraphone input - that
      should be about the same level as a turntable output. I
      had been concerned that I would need a pre-amp to match
      the levels.

      I had also been concerned that a person would need to
      buy software and/or hardware to digitalize the signal
      coming out of the turntable; aparently not so, eh?
    • mrbig1492@comcast.net
      The problem is that most (perhaps all) mic inputs are not stereo. I suspect even those with a 3 conductor plug merely combine the left and right by tying
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 1, 2008
        The problem is that most (perhaps all) mic inputs are not stereo. I suspect even those with a 3 conductor plug merely combine the "left" and "right" by tying them together just after the jack on the circuit board.

        The "line in" connection is the stereo in path.

        Could I be wrong? Sure!

        But I could also be right.

        As far as "levels" I don't even know that answer.

        Ernie

        -------------- Original message ----------------------
        From: "Dr. Bubba Gump" <nadezalli@...>
        > Now I'm getting really interested in trying this.
        >
        > The 1/8" jack on my laptop is a micraphone input - that
        > should be about the same level as a turntable output. I
        > had been concerned that I would need a pre-amp to match
        > the levels.
        >
        > I had also been concerned that a person would need to
        > buy software and/or hardware to digitalize the signal
        > coming out of the turntable; aparently not so, eh?
        >
        >




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • dennis_tolsma
        Just picked up this thread, and have a couple of extensions of remarks. I use Sony Audio Forge and ROxio Media Creator. Both were net $20 after upgrade.
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 2, 2008
          Just picked up this thread, and have a couple of extensions of
          remarks. I use Sony Audio Forge and ROxio Media Creator. Both were
          net $20 after upgrade. (You need one of their products to get the
          full "free after rebate.") Each has something like "LP and Cassette
          audio capture" and each has audio restoration software. I have never
          figured out the Roxio system of "-db" correction, as the manual is
          minimalist. But, you can take a track into the editor, max the
          resolution and literally clip out the pop&click noises. Rumble is an
          issue though, and I am now convinced that there is rumble induced by
          the PC too...maybe the disk motor or fan?

          Regarding the RCA Y connector, be sure you look carefully at the end
          of your turntable line out, are they male? You'd need then female
          connectors on the Y end of the RCA and a male at the other end. RCA
          come with any of the possible connector options

          Regarding importing direct from turntable, I'd be dubious that the
          output will be high enough gain to make a good pickup from your sound
          card. (There's a lot of distortion when I tried it with my cassette
          deck.) I'm also not sure if your mic input is the same quality
          circuitry as a genuine line in. Finally, you'd get better quality
          with a sound card, but the integrated circuitry (mine is RealTec)
          seems to do pretty solid job for my aging ears. (PS the RealTec
          console calls that slot "line in" even though it is labeled Mic by
          HP. So, maybe it's able to handle higher level input than voice
          optimized mic.)

          The above paragraph is meant to suggest you'd be best off with a pre-
          amp as rainman wrote, but another good option is to use your previous
          stereo receiver, if reasonable quality and still around. You could
          pull your current one out of the system but not many current
          generation stereo receiver have phono jacks (meaning a preamp for
          phono is no longer built in.) Alas, not all stereo receivers come
          with a Line-Out jack (you'd need the right RCA Y for that, might be
          all male jacks if you have a line out.) So, the work-around for that
          is to use your headphone output. You'll need a stereo audio cable
          for that, male on both ends, and probably an adapter to mate the
          audio cable to the larger headphone jack on the receiver. I have
          done this with cassette deck to receiver to headphone to PC line in,
          and it works. Each of these connectors is fairly cheap, RCA, earphone
          jack downsizer, audio cable.

          Full disclosure, each work around degrades quality a bit, such as
          earphone instead of lineout. If you mean to make CDs to listen in
          your car, no audiophile would detect it. If you have to do audio
          restoration and noise correction on LPs, and want to play through
          high-end stereo system, yeah, an audiophile would hear that. If you
          are over 50, you'll never know what you are missing <grin>

          --- In pockettunes@yahoogroups.com, Raymond Perry <rainmanp99@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > If you have a turntable/stereo with RCA (red/white) output jacks,
          as most do, you can get a simple adapter from Radio Shack that
          combines the red/white to a standard 3.5mm (1/8") stereo plug. You
          can just plug that into your "line in" then record with any
          recording software. I use Roxio Media Creator which has recording
          capability. I'm sure Pinnacle and Nero plus many others will work,
          including some free stuff. Hooking a turntable directly to a PC this
          way may not work because turntables have pretty low output. So you
          do have to go through a stereo as someone described or get one of
          these:

          > Frys.com has a pretty good deal on Roxio Record Now, FREE after
          rebate. If you buy from Fry's, which is a great place to do
          business, be sure to download the rebate form before you purchase.
          For some reason on their system you can't download it later, but you
          can get it from customer service if necessary.
          > http://shop3.outpost.com/product/5121266
          >
          >
          > I have also recently seen USB turntables specifically designed for
          this application on sale for pretty reasonable prices at places like
          Circuit City or Best Buy. They come with recording software.
          >
          > It is real time recording so it does take some time. I usually get
          a recording started, set a timer (most cell phones have timer
          capability) for a few minutes less than estimated record time. Stop
          that one, start another, repeat.
          >
          > Hope this helps.
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Dr. Bubba Gump
          Thanks Dennis, Ernie, and others, I guess there is hope for doing it the old fashioned way with the restored Pioneer manual turntable and Technics Receiver.
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 3, 2008
            Thanks Dennis, Ernie, and others,

            I guess there is hope for doing it "the old fashioned way"
            with the restored Pioneer manual turntable and Technics Receiver.
            I would guess that the "rumble" Dennis hears, is from the turntable
            because I've heard that when backing up my vinyl LPs to reel to reel
            tape. Try putting twice-folded wash cloths (forms a little square
            about 4" x 4" and 1/2" thick) under the feet of the turntable to
            see if that reduces the rumble.

            All best wishes to all Y'all! Bubba


            --- In pockettunes@yahoogroups.com, "dennis_tolsma"
            <dennis_tolsma@...> wrote:
            >
            > Just picked up this thread, and have a couple of extensions of
            > remarks. I use Sony Audio Forge and ROxio Media Creator. Both
            were
            > net $20 after upgrade. (You need one of their products to get the
            > full "free after rebate.") Each has something like "LP and Cassette
            > audio capture" and each has audio restoration software. I have
            never
            > figured out the Roxio system of "-db" correction, as the manual is
            > minimalist. But, you can take a track into the editor, max the
            > resolution and literally clip out the pop&click noises. Rumble is
            an
            > issue though, and I am now convinced that there is rumble induced
            by
            > the PC too...maybe the disk motor or fan?
            >
            > Regarding the RCA Y connector, be sure you look carefully at the
            end
            > of your turntable line out, are they male? You'd need then female
            > connectors on the Y end of the RCA and a male at the other end. RCA
            > come with any of the possible connector options
            >
            > Regarding importing direct from turntable, I'd be dubious that the
            > output will be high enough gain to make a good pickup from your
            sound
            > card. (There's a lot of distortion when I tried it with my cassette
            > deck.) I'm also not sure if your mic input is the same quality
            > circuitry as a genuine line in. Finally, you'd get better quality
            > with a sound card, but the integrated circuitry (mine is RealTec)
            > seems to do pretty solid job for my aging ears. (PS the RealTec
            > console calls that slot "line in" even though it is labeled Mic by
            > HP. So, maybe it's able to handle higher level input than voice
            > optimized mic.)
            >
            > The above paragraph is meant to suggest you'd be best off with a
            pre-
            > amp as rainman wrote, but another good option is to use your
            previous
            > stereo receiver, if reasonable quality and still around. You could
            > pull your current one out of the system but not many current
            > generation stereo receiver have phono jacks (meaning a preamp for
            > phono is no longer built in.) Alas, not all stereo receivers come
            > with a Line-Out jack (you'd need the right RCA Y for that, might be
            > all male jacks if you have a line out.) So, the work-around for
            that
            > is to use your headphone output. You'll need a stereo audio cable
            > for that, male on both ends, and probably an adapter to mate the
            > audio cable to the larger headphone jack on the receiver. I have
            > done this with cassette deck to receiver to headphone to PC line
            in,
            > and it works. Each of these connectors is fairly cheap, RCA,
            earphone
            > jack downsizer, audio cable.
            >
            > Full disclosure, each work around degrades quality a bit, such as
            > earphone instead of lineout. If you mean to make CDs to listen in
            > your car, no audiophile would detect it. If you have to do audio
            > restoration and noise correction on LPs, and want to play through
            > high-end stereo system, yeah, an audiophile would hear that. If
            you
            > are over 50, you'll never know what you are missing <grin>
            >
            > --- In pockettunes@yahoogroups.com, Raymond Perry <rainmanp99@>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > If you have a turntable/stereo with RCA (red/white) output jacks,
            > as most do, you can get a simple adapter from Radio Shack that
            > combines the red/white to a standard 3.5mm (1/8") stereo plug.
            You
            > can just plug that into your "line in" then record with any
            > recording software. I use Roxio Media Creator which has recording
            > capability. I'm sure Pinnacle and Nero plus many others will work,
            > including some free stuff. Hooking a turntable directly to a PC
            this
            > way may not work because turntables have pretty low output. So you
            > do have to go through a stereo as someone described or get one of
            > these:
            >
            > > Frys.com has a pretty good deal on Roxio Record Now, FREE after
            > rebate. If you buy from Fry's, which is a great place to do
            > business, be sure to download the rebate form before you purchase.
            > For some reason on their system you can't download it later, but
            you
            > can get it from customer service if necessary.
            > > http://shop3.outpost.com/product/5121266
            > >
            > >
            > > I have also recently seen USB turntables specifically designed
            for
            > this application on sale for pretty reasonable prices at places
            like
            > Circuit City or Best Buy. They come with recording software.
            > >
            > > It is real time recording so it does take some time. I usually
            get
            > a recording started, set a timer (most cell phones have timer
            > capability) for a few minutes less than estimated record time.
            Stop
            > that one, start another, repeat.
            > >
            > > Hope this helps.
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >
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