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Re: [PLWP2] Hot flashes

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  • Kelly Liddington
    JoAnne, being a guy I can t speak personally about this much, but witnessing my wife s turmoil you have my sympathy.  I m not sure why your doc hasn t changed
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 8, 2010
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      JoAnne, being a guy I can't speak personally about this much, but witnessing my wife's turmoil you have my sympathy.  I'm not sure why your doc hasn't changed you to the extended release mirapex but you would do well to do it.  It will level out your blood levels of the drug and make your system much more resposive to the drug.  Prior to the switch, I had a cuple of "flush" instances when I was hot, not saying it was a magnitude 6.0 on the richter scale mind you, but that hasn't happened since the change and my whole energy levels have improved so much, make the change and see if they subside.
       
       
      --- On Sun, 8/8/10, JoAnne Beninger <beninger@...> wrote:

      From: JoAnne Beninger <beninger@...>
      Subject: [PLWP2] Hot flashes
      To: plwp2@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sunday, August 8, 2010, 10:22 PM

       

      I was diagnosed 8 years ago and have recently started something new and un pleasant.  I am 66 years old and am having hot flashes for the second time in my life.  I’m sure that I’m not the only one affected by this and I am wondering if anyone knows or has an idea what is causing it.  I am on Mirapex – 1 mg x3 and Carbidopa/Levodopa – 25/100 x3 per day. The second meds are to help with balance and walking.   Thanks in advance for the info.

      JoAnne


    • Meg Duggan
      Hi Joanne - Hot flashes with Mirapex are not uncommon. I agree that you might try the extended release - or even ask to try Requip instead of Mirapex.  Same
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 8, 2010
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        Hi Joanne - Hot flashes with Mirapex are not uncommon. I agree that you might try the extended release - or even ask to try Requip instead of Mirapex.  Same class of drugs (dopamine agonists) though people tend to do well on one or the other.  Worst of mirapex seems to be addictive or compulsive behaviors, worst of requip seems to be daytime sleepiness - serious daytime sleepiness I mean!
         
        As a person doing my first round of hot flashes at 50, I can certainly sympathize with the desire not to do it again - especially for what might be the long haul.  I at least have hope that this too shall pass....
         
        Just an informed by experience opinion by the way!  Meg


        From: Kelly Liddington <kellyliddington@...>
        To: plwp2@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sun, August 8, 2010 6:22:11 PM
        Subject: Re: [PLWP2] Hot flashes

         

        JoAnne, being a guy I can't speak personally about this much, but witnessing my wife's turmoil you have my sympathy.  I'm not sure why your doc hasn't changed you to the extended release mirapex but you would do well to do it.  It will level out your blood levels of the drug and make your system much more resposive to the drug.  Prior to the switch, I had a cuple of "flush" instances when I was hot, not saying it was a magnitude 6.0 on the richter scale mind you, but that hasn't happened since the change and my whole energy levels have improved so much, make the change and see if they subside.
         
         
        --- On Sun, 8/8/10, JoAnne Beninger <beninger@eastlink. ca> wrote:

        From: JoAnne Beninger <beninger@eastlink. ca>
        Subject: [PLWP2] Hot flashes
        To: plwp2@yahoogroups. com
        Date: Sunday, August 8, 2010, 10:22 PM

         

        I was diagnosed 8 years ago and have recently started something new and un pleasant.  I am 66 years old and am having hot flashes for the second time in my life.  I’m sure that I’m not the only one affected by this and I am wondering if anyone knows or has an idea what is causing it.  I am on Mirapex – 1 mg x3 and Carbidopa/Levodopa – 25/100 x3 per day. The second meds are to help with balance and walking.   Thanks in advance for the info.

        JoAnne



      • Meg Duggan
        Hi Clouddancer - The research on Mirapex ABSLOLTELY shows a connection between heat, dizziness and fainting. Yikes.  I ll send you the citations if you want
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 8, 2010
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          Hi Clouddancer - The research on Mirapex ABSLOLTELY shows a connection between heat, dizziness and fainting. Yikes.  I'll send you the citations if you want them - take them to your neurologist and get your meds changed or modified.  If you are having trouble with fainting, this isn't something you probably have to live with. PD is quite enough, lets rid ourselves of the stuff we don't have to have!    Meg


          From: Clouddancer <clouddancer1@...>
          To: plwp2@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sun, August 8, 2010 6:38:08 PM
          Subject: Re: [PLWP2] Hot flashes

           

          JoAnne
          I also went through a period of 'hot flashes'.  I was still working then and the cube I worked in was moved to the center of a very large room.  I was so hot all the time I was miserable.  I'm no longer working but recently had to give up a yoga class because the room was too hot.  I have a nasty habit of passing out if I'm too hot.  I know it isn't caused by menopause and the only explanation my MDS gave me was that it was due to my dyskinesia.  I'm in a constant state of movement sometime more than others.  Do you experience any dyskinesia?
           
          Millie
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Sunday, August 08, 2010 3:22 PM
          Subject: [PLWP2] Hot flashes

           

          I was diagnosed 8 years ago and have recently started something new and un pleasant.  I am 66 years old and am having hot flashes for the second time in my life.  I’m sure that I’m not the only one affected by this and I am wondering if anyone knows or has an idea what is causing it.  I am on Mirapex – 1 mg x3 and Carbidopa/Levodopa – 25/100 x3 per day. The second meds are to help with balance and walking.   Thanks in advance for the info.

          JoAnne


        • natlp1
          JoAnne I am 50 years old, and have been experiencing hot flashes on and off. I am on the same dose of Sinemet. I m honestly not sure if my hot flashes are
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 9, 2010
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            JoAnne

            I am 50 years old, and have been experiencing hot flashes on and off. I am on the same dose of Sinemet. I'm honestly not sure if my hot flashes are related to my age, or the meds. I suspect the meds have something to do with it, because the hot flashes seem to come in the evening, when I'm off the Sinemet (I stop taking it by late afternoon)
            unfortunately, I have not read anything or heard anything about what might cause this.

            --- In plwp2@yahoogroups.com, JoAnne Beninger <beninger@...> wrote:
            >
            > I was diagnosed 8 years ago and have recently started something new and un
            > pleasant. I am 66 years old and am having hot flashes for the second time
            > in my life. I'm sure that I'm not the only one affected by this and I am
            > wondering if anyone knows or has an idea what is causing it. I am on
            > Mirapex - 1 mg x3 and Carbidopa/Levodopa - 25/100 x3 per day. The second
            > meds are to help with balance and walking. Thanks in advance for the info.
            >
            > JoAnne
            >
          • George Copsey
            Hmmm... I have found that my PD meds make me warmer than in the past-- at a meeting, my wife will be sitting with a blanket on, and I will be sweating
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 9, 2010
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              Hmmm... I have found that my PD meds make me warmer than in the past-- at a
              meeting, my wife will be sitting with a blanket on, and I will be sweating
              slightly. Not the same as a woman's hot flashes, of course, but....

              At home, with the AC set to 73, I sit in my swim trunks with a tee shirt on,
              whereas my wife will be cuddled in a sleeping bag for comfort.

              We were at slightly different temperature comfort levels before I started on
              Sinemet 2 years ago, but now it is dramatically different.

              I was under the impression that a known side effect of Sinemet is feeling
              warmer-- comes in handy here in Minnesota in the Winter!

              On that note-- has anyone else noticed that your PD symptoms worsen in the
              winter, or is it just me? If a 10 is the best I feel, winter days generally
              rate a 4 or so.


              Regards,


              George
            • Jenny Picaso
              George, I hate winter because it just hurts too much. The cold and damp make my aches and pains seem so much more pronounced. I also have heavy night sweats on
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 9, 2010
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                George, I hate winter because it just hurts too much. The cold and damp make my aches and pains seem so much more pronounced. I also have heavy night sweats on the sinemet. Usually during the day I am freezing most of the time. My doctor did a blood test and assured me it is not hormonal.
                 
                Jenny Picaso
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Monday, August 09, 2010 2:49 PM
                Subject: [PLWP2] Re:Hot flashes

                 

                Hmmm... I have found that my PD meds make me warmer than in the past-- at a
                meeting, my wife will be sitting with a blanket on, and I will be sweating
                slightly. Not the same as a woman's hot flashes, of course, but....

                At home, with the AC set to 73, I sit in my swim trunks with a tee shirt on,
                whereas my wife will be cuddled in a sleeping bag for comfort.

                We were at slightly different temperature comfort levels before I started on
                Sinemet 2 years ago, but now it is dramatically different.

                I was under the impression that a known side effect of Sinemet is feeling
                warmer-- comes in handy here in Minnesota in the Winter!

                On that note-- has anyone else noticed that your PD symptoms worsen in the
                winter, or is it just me? If a 10 is the best I feel, winter days generally
                rate a 4 or so.

                Regards,

                George

              • mjc0827@aol.com
                Unfortunately, hot flashes are a autonomic symptom of Parkinson s disease. Actually medical science should stop calling PD a disease because it is more of a
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 10, 2010
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                  Unfortunately, hot flashes are a autonomic symptom of Parkinson's disease. Actually medical science should stop calling PD a disease because it is more of a syndrome. What I am saying is that the more we discover about PD, the more symptoms and levels of severity we are finding. This disease is different in every individual, although there are certain characteristics that we all share but mostly it is a whole body disease. Think about all the bodily functions we take for granted such as: breathing, swallowing, memory, computation, walking, smelling, and other non motor functions like normal body temperature control. Control over our bladder, maintaining a healthy immune system, abnormal thoughts of depression, anxiety, fatigue. All these bodily functions are linked to dopamine which in a normal person is produced naturally by the substania nigra region of the brain in just the right amount.
                   
                  In a person with PD, dopamine production is hindered by a lack of dopamine by the sub-thalamas, as much as 70%. This dopamine is broken down into estrogen, glutathione, seretonen and other signal cells that automatically are dispatched throughout the body to perform natural body functions. The lack of dopamine or the erratic dispatch of that dopamine gives off error messages to the various functions. Sinemet, is a synthetic replacement for that dopamine which even after stopping for the night, lingers in varying amounts in the body. Although, not perfect, Sinement is still the gold standard for PD patients. The problem is, our bodies absorb and use this replacement dopamine at differing rates and thereby causing misfires called diskenesias. These can cause a rise in body temperature fluctuations.
                   
                  Solution - discuss this with your neurologist and ask if there is something else you can take or do to offset the hot flashes. One suggestion could be to perhaps take a dose at bedtime or spread your dosages out over a longer period. Your doctor is more qualified to make this decision.
                   
                  Michael J. Church
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