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Hand injuries from basket making & getting baskets tight

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  • giraffe251
    Hi, all. I ve got a problem I think stemmed from having done no basket making for a month or two and then basket-making for more than just an hour several
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 18, 2010
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      Hi, all. I've got a problem I think stemmed from having done no basket making for a month or two and then basket-making for more than just an hour several times a day for multiple days.

      The problem is called de Quervain's something, and, very simply, it's an inflammation in the wrist area (of my left hand) and it HURTS. I saw an orthopedic doctor about it yesterday and asked about pine needling despite the injury, and she advised me not to do it. Bummer, mainly because this has been going on since the 1st of the year and can take 3-4 more MONTHS to regain pain-free movement in that hand.

      I'm wondering if I should not have pulled so hard on the thread (to get a good, tight basket) because this put undue strain on that part of my wrist--the one holding the basket.

      Anyway, not to go on and on, but I miss making baskets and want to explore ways of avoiding problems in the future, when I can take it up again.

      How do you deal with getting your baskets tight enough so they don't flop around? I typically use upholstery thread, because when I tried raffia, it kept breaking when I pulled my stitches tight.

      giraffe251
    • Debbie White
      I use artificial sinew. It eliminates the need to hold the thread too tight and the effect is great. Also, try to hold the basket you are working in a variety
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 18, 2010
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        I use artificial sinew. It eliminates the need to hold the thread too tight and the effect is great. Also, try to hold the basket you are working in a variety of positions to use different muscles, etc.
         
        Good luck!


        From: giraffe251 <giraffe251@...>
        To: pineneedlebasketgroup@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thu, February 18, 2010 10:48:30 AM
        Subject: [pineneedlebasketgroup] Hand injuries from basket making & getting baskets tight

         

        Hi, all. I've got a problem I think stemmed from having done no basket making for a month or two and then basket-making for more than just an hour several times a day for multiple days.

        The problem is called de Quervain's something, and, very simply, it's an inflammation in the wrist area (of my left hand) and it HURTS. I saw an orthopedic doctor about it yesterday and asked about pine needling despite the injury, and she advised me not to do it. Bummer, mainly because this has been going on since the 1st of the year and can take 3-4 more MONTHS to regain pain-free movement in that hand.

        I'm wondering if I should not have pulled so hard on the thread (to get a good, tight basket) because this put undue strain on that part of my wrist--the one holding the basket.

        Anyway, not to go on and on, but I miss making baskets and want to explore ways of avoiding problems in the future, when I can take it up again.

        How do you deal with getting your baskets tight enough so they don't flop around? I typically use upholstery thread, because when I tried raffia, it kept breaking when I pulled my stitches tight.

        giraffe251


      • gloriaa
        I make my baskets stiff enough mostly by varnishing them after they are made. I stitch them tightly enough to hold the shape and let the varnish do the rest.
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 18, 2010
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          I make my baskets stiff enough mostly by varnishing them after they are made. I stitch them tightly enough to hold the shape and let the varnish do the rest.

          The size of the coil you use and the size and shape of the basket also influnce how stiff it is.
        • gloriaa
          Other thoughts: The closer together the stitches are, the stiffer the basket will be. Also, doing a 2 or 3 part stitch will result in a tighter basket than
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 18, 2010
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            Other thoughts: The closer together the stitches are, the stiffer the basket will be. Also, doing a 2 or 3 part stitch will result in a tighter basket than will a one part stitch.
          • Sue Cowell
            I agree. I switched to artificial sinew, and lost a lot of problems. However, I still have wrist and hand problems when I coil for hours on end. I ve found
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 18, 2010
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              I agree.  I switched to artificial sinew, and lost a lot of problems.  However, I still have wrist and hand problems when I coil for hours on end.  I've found that stopping and doing hand exercises every so often has mitigated the problem.  sue c
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Thursday, February 18, 2010 8:46 AM
              Subject: Re: [pineneedlebasketgroup] Hand injuries from basket making & getting baskets tight

               

              I use artificial sinew. It eliminates the need to hold the thread too tight and the effect is great. Also, try to hold the basket you are working in a variety of positions to use different muscles, etc.
               
              Good luck!


              From: giraffe251 <giraffe251@yahoo. com>
              To: pineneedlebasketgro up@yahoogroups. com
              Sent: Thu, February 18, 2010 10:48:30 AM
              Subject: [pineneedlebasketgr oup] Hand injuries from basket making & getting baskets tight

               

              Hi, all. I've got a problem I think stemmed from having done no basket making for a month or two and then basket-making for more than just an hour several times a day for multiple days.

              The problem is called de Quervain's something, and, very simply, it's an inflammation in the wrist area (of my left hand) and it HURTS. I saw an orthopedic doctor about it yesterday and asked about pine needling despite the injury, and she advised me not to do it. Bummer, mainly because this has been going on since the 1st of the year and can take 3-4 more MONTHS to regain pain-free movement in that hand.

              I'm wondering if I should not have pulled so hard on the thread (to get a good, tight basket) because this put undue strain on that part of my wrist--the one holding the basket.

              Anyway, not to go on and on, but I miss making baskets and want to explore ways of avoiding problems in the future, when I can take it up again.

              How do you deal with getting your baskets tight enough so they don't flop around? I typically use upholstery thread, because when I tried raffia, it kept breaking when I pulled my stitches tight.

              giraffe251


            • Pam
              Artificial Sinew may work better for you than apolstery thread, Sinew is waxet to halp make it go through the needles easier and also to help preserve the
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 19, 2010
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                Artificial Sinew may work better for you than apolstery thread, Sinew is waxet to halp make it go through the needles easier and also to help preserve the thread so it will last for years. It also lays kind of flat and wrapped rows go smoothly with it.
                SisterlyLv Pam

                --- In pineneedlebasketgroup@yahoogroups.com, "giraffe251" <giraffe251@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi, all. I've got a problem I think stemmed from having done no basket making for a month or two and then basket-making for more than just an hour several times a day for multiple days.
                >
                > The problem is called de Quervain's something, and, very simply, it's an inflammation in the wrist area (of my left hand) and it HURTS. I saw an orthopedic doctor about it yesterday and asked about pine needling despite the injury, and she advised me not to do it. Bummer, mainly because this has been going on since the 1st of the year and can take 3-4 more MONTHS to regain pain-free movement in that hand.
                >
                > I'm wondering if I should not have pulled so hard on the thread (to get a good, tight basket) because this put undue strain on that part of my wrist--the one holding the basket.
                >
                > Anyway, not to go on and on, but I miss making baskets and want to explore ways of avoiding problems in the future, when I can take it up again.
                >
                > How do you deal with getting your baskets tight enough so they don't flop around? I typically use upholstery thread, because when I tried raffia, it kept breaking when I pulled my stitches tight.
                >
                > giraffe251
                >
              • giraffe251
                Thanks, everyone, for your suggestions. I look forward to making some changes (after the hand/wrist heals, of course). giraffe251
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 19, 2010
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                  Thanks, everyone, for your suggestions. I look forward to making some changes (after the hand/wrist heals, of course).

                  giraffe251
                • G. Ladouceur
                  When my wrist bothers me, I wear a wrist brace AT NIGHT. That 7 or 8 hours of support at night seems to refresh my wrist enough for me to go beat it up for a
                  Message 8 of 9 , Feb 20, 2010
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                    When my wrist bothers me, I wear a wrist brace AT NIGHT.  That 7 or 8 hours of support at night seems to refresh my wrist enough for me to go beat it up for a while the next day.  :)
                     
                    I put beeswax on my finished baskets.  It firms them up and it can be buffed up to a nice glow with a soft shoe brush whenever the basket starts to look a bit dull.
                     
                    Giselle (new to the group but has been doing pineneedle baskets for years) 
                  • hatmaker32702
                    This is probably not the right thing to do but when I buttonhole a lot of wire, I sometimes have trouble with my right wrist. I bought a brace with metal that
                    Message 9 of 9 , Feb 20, 2010
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                      This is probably not the right thing to do but when I buttonhole a lot of wire, I sometimes have trouble with my right wrist. I bought a brace with metal that is bent to fit above my wrist and extends to the palm of my hand. It velcros closed and I keep on doing my project. I got it at the drug store.
                      Kaye Burlason
                      Pine Needle Granny

                      PS: If you are in the area, don't miss the gourd show (Feb 26, 27 and 28) in Palatka, Florida. I am hoping to be there on Sunday. I am checking out Molly Cromwell's Miniature Show in Orlando tomorrow. She has invited me to do her Orlando and Sarasota mini show before but I just want to go see how they set up and have fun this year.

                      --- In pineneedlebasketgroup@yahoogroups.com, "giraffe251" <giraffe251@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Thanks, everyone, for your suggestions. I look forward to making some changes (after the hand/wrist heals, of course).
                      >
                      > giraffe251
                      >
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