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Re: [photographic-techniques] Re: more on f/2.8 lenses...

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  • grspette66@aol.com
    In a message dated 3/23/06 2:05:42 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... Some good thoughts Dan and thanks for the plug. Come visit at www.colorcameraclub.org Jerry
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 1, 2006
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      In a message dated 3/23/06 2:05:42 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      darag2358@... writes:

      > Ok, yes, fast lenses are great. A fast lens doesn't always mean it's a
      > great lens though. Some 2.8 lenses are better than others and it has to
      > do with the lens design and glass quality. More importantly, slower
      > lenses aren't necessarily bad lenses either (e.g Nikon 28-105, 18-70, or
      > others). If you are really in to the hobby get the best lenses you can
      > afford, they really make a difference, but don't let anyone here or
      > anywhere make you think that you can't great great shots if you don't have
      > $1500 lenses attached to your camera. Personally, I have found that I
      > have gotten rid of my slower lenses (I think my *slowest* lenses are 2.8
      > now) because I really enjoy using natural light as much as possible, but I
      > have also found ways to make it fit in my personal budget.
      >
      > Also, consider getting some prime (non-zoom) lenses. They can be really
      > great bargains and even faster than the most expensive zoom lens. I shoot
      > Nikon and my 50mm f/1.4 is on my camera a lot, even though it is a
      > fraction of the cost of my 28-70 (or my future 17-55). The 50 1.8 is a
      > superb bargain and you can usually find them used for around $75-80 bucks.
      > The 85mm 1.8 can usually be found used for around $275 or so and it's
      > about 1 1/3 stops faster and waaay cheaper than my 70-200 2.8. But they
      > all have their uses and I wouldn't get rid of my zoom lenses either.
      >
      > There are so many different options out there and unless you have a big
      > bankroll (or an understanding spouse in my case), it's nearly impossible
      > to get everything you want. The trick is to get the most out of what you
      > can afford.
      >
      > Also, sounds like you could use some lessons on the basics of photography.
      > Believe it or not, your camera manual probably has some information about
      > aperture and shutter speed and how it all goes together to make properly
      > exposed images. Your library probably has some good books you can check
      > out. The internet has TONS of information as well, including the great
      > members of this group. And as Jerry probably would tell you, look in to
      > joining a camera club in your area. :)
      >
      > Dan
      >

      Some good thoughts Dan and thanks for the plug.

      Come visit at www.colorcameraclub.org

      Jerry


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