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Re: candids and bright sunlight

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  • KPPhotography
    It appears from the gallery images that you have no control over where anyone is standing relative to the sun. Perhaps your best bet is fill flash. For the
    Message 1 of 5 , May 1, 2005
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      It appears from the gallery images that you have no control over where
      anyone is standing relative to the sun. Perhaps your best bet is fill
      flash. For the close images (within 10-12 feet) you could use your
      onboard flash. You'd be better off using an addon flash so as to have
      more power for the longer shots. Knowing more about the camera/flash
      combo you have will help to give you more detailed directions.

      If your camera supports it, set your Flash Compensation for around -1 or
      -1.5 and shoot away. This will force the flash to pop enough light to
      fill the shadows without looking too much like a flash was used in the
      photo. If Flash Comp is not available, you'll need to use the Auto mode
      on the flash. Auto flash modes allow you to set the aperture at one
      place and the flash will adjust based on subject distance. You'll need
      to experiment a bit, but usually I find that using Aperture priority on
      the camera (around f8 or f11) and setting the Auto mode to use the same
      aperture gives decent fill. Using an Auto mode on the flash at 1 stop
      difference (camera at f8, flash at f11) will give a more subtle flash
      effect.

      =======================
      Karl Peschel
      karl@...
      www.kpphotography.com
      =======================

      photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com wrote:

      >Message: 3
      > Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2005 00:46:53 -0700 (PDT)
      > From: Baume FotoArte <baume_fotoarte@...>
      >Subject: candids and bright sunlight
      >
      >all:
      > I took this shot a few weeks ago in London. Bright, direct sunlight can be a problem, especially with certain skin complexions. Anyone with considerable experience I would appreciate some advice
      >
    • Baume FotoArte
      thank you all for the constructive comments--I won t say criticism 8-) I wasn t traveling alone while in London, and I didn t have much time to myself. I
      Message 2 of 5 , May 3, 2005
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        thank you all for the constructive comments--I won't say criticism 8-) I wasn't traveling alone while in London, and I didn't have much time to myself. I had my flash, but didn't think to use it since it was a bright day. Next time I will give the flash a try, both in program mode and aperture priority mode; but I will say, using a flash doesn't lend itself to candid photography; people tend to clam up when they see the menacing, obtrusive SLR coming around the corner...



        KPPhotography <karl@...> wrote:
        It appears from the gallery images that you have no control over where
        anyone is standing relative to the sun. Perhaps your best bet is fill
        flash. For the close images (within 10-12 feet) you could use your
        onboard flash. You'd be better off using an addon flash so as to have
        more power for the longer shots. Knowing more about the camera/flash
        combo you have will help to give you more detailed directions.

        If your camera supports it, set your Flash Compensation for around -1 or
        -1.5 and shoot away. This will force the flash to pop enough light to
        fill the shadows without looking too much like a flash was used in the
        photo. If Flash Comp is not available, you'll need to use the Auto mode
        on the flash. Auto flash modes allow you to set the aperture at one
        place and the flash will adjust based on subject distance. You'll need
        to experiment a bit, but usually I find that using Aperture priority on
        the camera (around f8 or f11) and setting the Auto mode to use the same
        aperture gives decent fill. Using an Auto mode on the flash at 1 stop
        difference (camera at f8, flash at f11) will give a more subtle flash
        effect.

        =======================
        Karl Peschel
        karl@...
        www.kpphotography.com
        =======================

        photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com wrote:

        >Message: 3
        > Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2005 00:46:53 -0700 (PDT)
        > From: Baume FotoArte <baume_fotoarte@...>
        >Subject: candids and bright sunlight
        >
        >all:
        > I took this shot a few weeks ago in London. Bright, direct sunlight can be a problem, especially with certain skin complexions. Anyone with considerable experience I would appreciate some advice
        >


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