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Re: [photographic-techniques] Re: B&W prints on color paper

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  • Rhianna VonZarovich
    Yes, black and white c-41 film can be printed on color paper, but depending on the brand of paper and chemicals (and the quality of the printer), you will get
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 1, 2003
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      Yes, black and white c-41 film can be printed on color paper, but depending on the brand of paper and chemicals (and the quality of the printer), you will get varying degrees of sepia or other coloring in the prints (Though, incidentally, if you go to a good lab, you can also get sepia prints... a lot of photographers like the warm, old-fashioned look that comes from it).

      The Fuji Frontier printer can now print black and white prints on color paper that are basically true black and white, because all the person has to do is select 'black and white' from an options menu. I think most new Wal-Marts have this machine, and I have been rather impressed with the results that come from it. I'm not a huge fan of Fuji, but I've been really happy with what has come from it. When you go to get your photos developed, you should be able ask what kind of printer they use. Or else, if you wanted to be really thorough and do your homework ahead of time, you can call ahead and see which printers certain places use.





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    • martha bleeker
      Rhianna VonZarovich wrote: Yes, black and white c-41 film can be printed on color paper, but depending on the brand of paper and
      Message 2 of 12 , Feb 1, 2003
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        Rhianna VonZarovich <contessa_rhianna@...> wrote:
        Yes, black and white c-41 film can be printed on color paper, but depending on the brand of paper and chemicals (and the quality of the printer), you will get varying degrees of sepia or other coloring in the prints (Though, incidentally, if you go to a good lab, you can also get sepia prints... a lot of photographers like the warm, old-fashioned look that comes from it).

        The Fuji Frontier printer can now print black and white prints on color paper that are basically true black and white, because all the person has to do is select 'black and white' from an options menu. I think most new Wal-Marts have this machine, and I have been rather impressed with the results that come from it. I'm not a huge fan of Fuji, but I've been really happy with what has come from it. When you go to get your photos developed, you should be able ask what kind of printer they use. Or else, if you wanted to be really thorough and do your homework ahead of time, you can call ahead and see which printers certain places use.





        "The lunatic, the lover, and the poet
        Are of imagination all compact."
        --William Shakespeare
        A Midsummer Night's Dream
        (Act 5, Scene 1)



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      • Clint Ryan
        I think besides the fact that it will not be true black and white and that there will be other colors in the print no matter how slight I think the biggest
        Message 3 of 12 , Feb 2, 2003
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          I think besides the fact that it will not be true black and white and
          that there will be other colors in the print no matter how slight I
          think the biggest draw back is the archival quality that is lost. True
          black and white prints will last for your life time while the prints
          made on color print film will after a while start to deteriorate. Go to
          a lab that will do justice to your prints and pay the price it will be
          worth the extra cost.

          Clint

          "Jason " wrote:

          > Hello folks,
          >
          > I'm ignorant on B&W photography. Anyway, I took a test roll to a
          > local minilab and they said they print B&W on color paper. Does this
          > have any negative effects on my prints? Does it matter? Got back the
          >
          > prints today, and they look B&W/shades of gray to me. One thing I
          > noticed was the grain. I used Kodak TMax 400. I foresee if I wanted
          > enlargements they'd be pretty bad. How does TMax 100 compare? Or got
          >
          > other brand recommendations? Cheers. -Jason
          >
          >
          >
          > Photographic Techniques
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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          >
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        • Jason <aude_et_effice@yahoo.com>
          Everyone, thanks for your comments, although most of the photography chemistry is above my head. Anyway, I m looking for true black and white without any
          Message 4 of 12 , Feb 2, 2003
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            Everyone, thanks for your comments, although most of the photography
            chemistry is above my head. Anyway, I'm looking for 'true black and
            white' without any possibility of slight color. So, to do this I need
            to go to a lab that prints B&W on white paper, correct?

            Another thing, I am limited on where I can go because I am without a
            car now. And being a poor grad student, can't afford to purchase a
            new/used car.

            So, can anyone recommend a good mail-order and/or on-line lab that
            develops and prints true B&W?

            FYI, I just came back from a month long backpacking trip (i.e.
            budget/independent travelling) through Japan and China. I got a
            half-dozen B&W rolls (Kodak TMax & Fuji Neopan) to print and don't
            want to make any compromises.

            Cheers,
            Jason

            > Clint Ryan <kodak@m...> wrote:
            > I think besides the fact that it will not be true black and white and
            > that there will be other colors in the print no matter how slight I
            > think the biggest draw back is the archival quality that is lost. True
            > black and white prints will last for your life time while the prints
            > made on color print film will after a while start to deteriorate. Go to
            > a lab that will do justice to your prints and pay the price it will be
            > worth the extra cost.
            >
            > Clint
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