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Re: How much duration for Portfolio?

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  • marklawleyphtog <marklawleyphtog@aol.com>
    ... Barry, A good rule of thumb is the reciprical of the focal length for hand holding the camera in ambient light. Example: 60mm, 1/60th sec; 200mm,
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 31, 2002
      --- In photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com, Barry Sommers
      <barrysomm@y...> wrote:
      > Thanks for the good ideas, but I am also looking for what
      > is considered a safe speed.

      Barry,
      A good "rule of thumb" is the reciprical of the focal length for hand
      holding the camera in ambient light. Example: 60mm, 1/60th sec;
      200mm, 1/250th....

      If you are using a tripod, you can very easily get one or two stops
      more, and probably be safe at much more. For people you can certainly
      use 1/30 or 1/15 if you tell them to hold still, realizing of course
      the problems associated with the other messages.

      ML
    • robert5227 <robert5227@hotmail.com>
      Barry, If you are using a tripod that is a good bit heavier than your camera and if the model isn t on speed or Starbucks, you can get by with slow speeds.
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 8, 2003
        Barry,

        If you are using a tripod that is a good bit heavier than your
        camera and if the model isn't on speed or Starbucks, you can get by
        with slow speeds. I've used 1/4 of a second in some cases and had
        no problem. I used a cable release, of course. Hint: as you
        release the shutter on a slow speed, watch the model live, not
        through the camera. That way you can see if she blinks or moves.
        Also, use a camera that you know to have accurate low shutter
        speeds. I took a big risk on a model shoot one time: for some
        important shots, I used a Rolleiflex that had been sitting on a
        shelf for more than twenty years. On top of that, I used the slow
        shutter speeds, which are the first to go bad on a mechanical
        camera. But the exposures were dead-on perfect. That is a real
        tribute to the Rolleiflex folks, as well as an example of
        photographer rashness.

        Are you using tungsten lights or natural light?



        Rob
      • Barry Sommers
        For headshots I use a vintage 210 mm Zeiss with an air piston timer. I reconditioned he piston and cylinder but it still sticks back at anything longer than
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 9, 2003
          For headshots I use a vintage 210 mm Zeiss with an air
          piston timer. I reconditioned he piston and cylinder but
          it still sticks back at anything longer than 1/25 second.
          Guess I have to get it apart again and see what the hangup
          is at the back of the stroke. For the full length shots I
          use a fairly modern 100 mm Zeiss Tessar with seemingly
          accurate speeds. The shutter has me a bit nervous because
          it feels like I am crushing a bowl of eggshells when
          cocking it at any speed. My camera is an MPP 4x5 Studio
          Camera. My tripod is heavy but no match for the MPP so
          back to ebay again. Thanks for your input on that. For
          lights I am using 1000 watt halogen construction site spots
          bounced off a 4' white umbrella. Guess it might be a good
          idea to bounce another 1000 watts off the white ceiling
          too.


          --- "robert5227 <robert5227@...>"
          <robert5227@...> wrote:
          > Barry,
          >
          > If you are using a tripod that is a good bit heavier than
          > your
          > camera and if the model isn't on speed or Starbucks, you
          > can get by
          > with slow speeds. I've used 1/4 of a second in some
          > cases and had
          > no problem. I used a cable release, of course. Hint:
          > as you
          > release the shutter on a slow speed, watch the model
          > live, not
          > through the camera. That way you can see if she blinks
          > or moves.
          > Also, use a camera that you know to have accurate low
          > shutter
          > speeds. I took a big risk on a model shoot one time:
          > for some
          > important shots, I used a Rolleiflex that had been
          > sitting on a
          > shelf for more than twenty years. On top of that, I used
          > the slow
          > shutter speeds, which are the first to go bad on a
          > mechanical
          > camera. But the exposures were dead-on perfect. That is
          > a real
          > tribute to the Rolleiflex folks, as well as an example of
          >
          > photographer rashness.
          >
          > Are you using tungsten lights or natural light?
          >
          >
          >
          > Rob
          >
          >
          >
          > Photographic Techniques
          >
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          >
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          >
          >


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        • Gregory david Stempel
          Rob, I have an absolutely mint Rolliflex. It was given to me in a will. I shot one roll through it, and all of the images came back overlapping one another.
          Message 4 of 11 , Jan 9, 2003
            Rob,

            I have an absolutely mint Rolliflex. It was given to me in a will. I shot
            one roll through it, and all of the images came back overlapping one
            another.

            Have you heard of the shutters slipping on these things? Or, do you know if
            you can not advance the frames far enough with the cocking handle? Is it
            more than one complete revolution to advance the film completely?

            Take care,
            Gregory david Stempel
            FIREFRAMEi m a g i n g
          • hairy possum
            Gregory, If the frames are overlaping, that isn t a shutter problem, but a winding mechanism problem. A good repair man can adjust the winding gears and all,
            Message 5 of 11 , Jan 9, 2003
              Gregory,

              If the frames are overlaping, that isn't a shutter
              problem, but a winding mechanism problem. A good
              repair man can adjust the winding gears and all, so
              that it won't happen.

              Hope this helps you.

              Lauvone

              =====
              www.Lauvone.com

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            • Gregory david Stempel
              Lauvone, Thanks for feedback. I was hoping it was user error. I was told by one repair business that it would cost $400 to rebuild the camera and it was not
              Message 6 of 11 , Jan 9, 2003
                Lauvone,

                Thanks for feedback. I was hoping it was user error. I was told by one
                repair business that it would cost $400 to rebuild the camera and it was not
                worth it according to him. So, it has just sat in my display case.


                Take care,
                Gregory david Stempel
                FIREFRAMEi m a g i n g
              • Frank Hovie <frank@hovie.net>
                I know this one .... It happened to me. There is a gear on the film pack that indexes with the camera body. Remove the film pack and advance the gear as far as
                Message 7 of 11 , Jan 10, 2003
                  I know this one .... It happened to me. There is a gear on the film
                  pack that indexes with the camera body. Remove the film pack and
                  advance the gear as far as it will go (it only goes in one direction)
                  this will reset the stroke and your advances will be correct.


                  --- In photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com, "Gregory david
                  Stempel" <fyrframe@c...> wrote:
                  > Rob,
                  >
                  > I have an absolutely mint Rolliflex. It was given to me in a will.
                  I shot
                  > one roll through it, and all of the images came back overlapping one
                  > another.
                  >
                  > Have you heard of the shutters slipping on these things? Or, do you
                  know if
                  > you can not advance the frames far enough with the cocking handle?
                  Is it
                  > more than one complete revolution to advance the film completely?
                  >
                  > Take care,
                  > Gregory david Stempel
                  > FIREFRAMEi m a g i n g
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