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Studio style lighting outside the studio

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  • Joe Hardy
    I have a problem I d really like some help with. I want to take pictures of people in normal settings (outside, at school, in churches, etc) but without the
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 22, 2001
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      I have a problem I'd really like some help with. I want to take pictures of
      people in normal settings (outside, at school, in churches, etc) but without
      the need to carry heavy studio lighting with me, but the only other flash I
      have fixes to the hotshoe and causes redeye everytime I use it. Is there
      anything I can buy that can get rid of redeye and offer flattering lighting
      to the subject?

      I did hear that I need to either use a seperate flash unit that I can hold
      off the camera. And I also heard that I can reverse the flash and use a
      brolly instead.

      This is confusing so will need to have this explained in more details, or
      have an alternative suggested instead. Can someone help?

      Joe

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    • Bob Bruce
      try using a strobe cover, can you tilt the flash head. There are plenty of ways to get rid of the red eye with out going nuts with studio flash. ... From:
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 23, 2001
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        try using a strobe cover, can you tilt the flash head. There are plenty of
        ways to get rid of the 'red' eye with out going nuts with studio flash.

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Joe Hardy [mailto:joehardy23@...]
        Sent: Sunday, July 22, 2001 6:12 PM
        To: photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [photographic-techniques] Studio style lighting outside the
        studio


        I have a problem I'd really like some help with. I want to take pictures of
        people in normal settings (outside, at school, in churches, etc) but without
        the need to carry heavy studio lighting with me, but the only other flash I
        have fixes to the hotshoe and causes redeye everytime I use it. Is there
        anything I can buy that can get rid of redeye and offer flattering lighting
        to the subject?

        I did hear that I need to either use a seperate flash unit that I can hold
        off the camera. And I also heard that I can reverse the flash and use a
        brolly instead.

        This is confusing so will need to have this explained in more details, or
        have an alternative suggested instead. Can someone help?

        Joe

        _________________________________________________________________
        Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp


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      • Sunshyne's Superman
        i like reflectors. (i bought a cheep car shade for my frist one) they are relitivly easy to use and a stand is not all that troublesome to carry around. wind
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 23, 2001
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          i like reflectors. (i bought a cheep car shade for my frist one) they are
          relitivly easy to use and a stand is not all that troublesome to carry
          around. wind is the only drawback.
          as for red eye oi use an old vivatar 285 with my medium format and i have
          never gotten redeye.

          BB
          josh



          >From: "Joe Hardy" <joehardy23@...>
          >Reply-To: photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com
          >To: photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [photographic-techniques] Studio style lighting outside the studio
          >Date: Sun, 22 Jul 2001 23:11:54 +0100
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          >
          >I have a problem I'd really like some help with. I want to take pictures
          >of
          >people in normal settings (outside, at school, in churches, etc) but
          >without
          >the need to carry heavy studio lighting with me, but the only other flash I
          >have fixes to the hotshoe and causes redeye everytime I use it. Is there
          >anything I can buy that can get rid of redeye and offer flattering lighting
          >to the subject?
          >
          >I did hear that I need to either use a seperate flash unit that I can hold
          >off the camera. And I also heard that I can reverse the flash and use a
          >brolly instead.
          >
          >This is confusing so will need to have this explained in more details, or
          >have an alternative suggested instead. Can someone help?
          >
          >Joe
          >
          >_________________________________________________________________
          >Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp
          >


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        • kevin.horn@talk21.com
          hi joe, why not use natural light and a faster film? as for red eye it is avoided but moving the flash off the lens axis so get a cable and an off camera
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 24, 2001
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            hi joe,
            why not use natural light and a faster film? as for red eye it is avoided but moving the flash off the lens axis so get a cable and an off camera adaptor that screws on the base plate. then stick a peice of white paper over it with an elastic band and remember you have now lost about a stop so compensate.

            good luck kev



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          • Joe Hardy
            What is a strobe cover? I m still quite new to photography so am not used to the more advance stuff. My flash does have a tilt, yes. Joe ...
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 27, 2001
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              What is a strobe cover? I'm still quite new to photography so am not used
              to the more advance stuff.

              My flash does have a tilt, yes.

              Joe

              >From: "Bob Bruce" <bmb77@...>
              >Reply-To: photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com
              >To: <photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com>
              >Subject: RE: [photographic-techniques] Studio style lighting outside the
              >studio
              >Date: Mon, 23 Jul 2001 23:01:04 -0400
              >
              >try using a strobe cover, can you tilt the flash head. There are plenty of
              >ways to get rid of the 'red' eye with out going nuts with studio flash.

              _________________________________________________________________
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            • Joe Hardy
              You used a cheap car shade as a reflector? How did you fix it up so the flash reflected off it? Joe ...
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 27, 2001
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                You used a cheap car shade as a reflector? How did you fix it up so the
                flash reflected off it?

                Joe
                >From: "Sunshyne's Superman" <thundercat56@...>
                >Reply-To: photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com
                >To: photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com
                >Subject: Re: [photographic-techniques] Studio style lighting outside the
                >studio
                >Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 03:25:01 +0000
                >
                >
                >
                >i like reflectors. (i bought a cheep car shade for my frist one) they are
                >relitivly easy to use and a stand is not all that troublesome to carry
                >around. wind is the only drawback.
                >as for red eye oi use an old vivatar 285 with my medium format and i have
                >never gotten redeye.
                >
                >BB
                >josh

                _________________________________________________________________
                Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp
              • Joe Hardy
                The problem I have with natural light is the shadows. I tried moving the person so the sun is behind me but this seems to piss them off (as I have to keep
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 27, 2001
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                  The problem I have with natural light is the shadows. I tried moving the
                  person so the sun is behind me but this seems to piss them off (as I have to
                  keep moving them around until the light is right). And using natural light
                  when there is lots of trees around is almost impossible as they cast shadows
                  everywhere. So it seems better to use other forms of lighting instead.

                  I'll try the white paper covering the flash idea to see how it works.

                  Joe
                  >From: kevin.horn@...
                  >Reply-To: photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com
                  >To: photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com
                  >Subject: Re: [photographic-techniques] Studio style lighting outside the
                  >studio
                  >Date: Tue, 24 Jul 2001 10:40:12 BST
                  >
                  >
                  >hi joe,
                  >why not use natural light and a faster film? as for red eye it is avoided
                  >but moving the flash off the lens axis so get a cable and an off camera
                  >adaptor that screws on the base plate. then stick a peice of white paper
                  >over it with an elastic band and remember you have now lost about a stop so
                  >compensate.
                  >
                  >good luck kev

                  _________________________________________________________________
                  Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp
                • Tony Yarusso
                  For your redeye problem I would suggest attaching pieces of white paper or paperboard to the flash and the bouncing of the light and slight diminishing of
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jul 28, 2001
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                    For your redeye problem I would suggest attaching pieces of white paper or
                    paperboard to the flash and the bouncing of the light and slight diminishing
                    of intensity might help eliminate the problem.
                    Tony
                  • Clint Ryan
                    One way of not getting red eye is to have subjects look to the side slightly, if they don t look directly into the flash you won t have it bounce back thru
                    Message 9 of 10 , Feb 5, 2002
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                      One way of not getting red eye is to have subjects look to the side slightly, if
                      they don't look directly into the flash you won't have it bounce back thru their
                      pupils. If you are using flash outdoors and getting red eye, your flash is too
                      strong it should fill in the shadows not be the main source of light. Set your
                      flash to a lower power or if that is not possible put a piece of tissue paper
                      over it.

                      Clint


                      > -----Original Message-----
                      > From: Joe Hardy [mailto:joehardy23@...]
                      > Sent: Sunday, July 22, 2001 6:12 PM
                      > To: photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: [photographic-techniques] Studio style lighting outside the
                      > studio
                      >
                      > I have a problem I'd really like some help with. I want to take pictures of
                      > people in normal settings (outside, at school, in churches, etc) but without
                      > the need to carry heavy studio lighting with me, but the only other flash I
                      > have fixes to the hotshoe and causes redeye everytime I use it. Is there
                      > anything I can buy that can get rid of redeye and offer flattering lighting
                      > to the subject?
                      >
                      > I did hear that I need to either use a seperate flash unit that I can hold
                      > off the camera. And I also heard that I can reverse the flash and use a
                      > brolly instead.
                      >
                      > This is confusing so will need to have this explained in more details, or
                      > have an alternative suggested instead. Can someone help?
                      >
                      > Joe
                    • Barry Kieffer
                      Red eye is caused by the flash lighting up the retina of the persons eye when the camera lens is on the same plane. The best way to avoid red eye is to get the
                      Message 10 of 10 , Feb 6, 2002
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                        Red eye is caused by the flash lighting up the retina of the persons eye when the camera lens is on the same plane. The best way to avoid red eye is to get the flash away from the camera lens.

                        Use one of the flash extension cords and hold the flash up in the air at arms length away from the lens.

                        There are other tricks but their successfulness is dubious. My Nikon N80/F80 has a red eye reduction feature (also known as a red eye generator). All this is is a bright pre-flash that is supposed to cause the model's pupil to dilate before the flash goes off. What a pre-flash or a auto-focus preflash really does is annoy your model.

                        Hope this helps.

                        Barry Kieffer
                        Portland, Oregon USA

                        "There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats."
                        -Albert Schweitzer






                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: Clint Ryan [mailto:kodak@...]
                        Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2002 5:12 PM
                        To: photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [photographic-techniques] Studio style lighting outside the studio


                        One way of not getting red eye is to have subjects look to the side slightly, if
                        they don't look directly into the flash you won't have it bounce back thru their
                        pupils. If you are using flash outdoors and getting red eye, your flash is too
                        strong it should fill in the shadows not be the main source of light. Set your
                        flash to a lower power or if that is not possible put a piece of tissue paper
                        over it.

                        Clint






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