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Do you know your DSLR as intimately as film experts knew their film?

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  • Les
    Hi Folks There seems to be some confusion amongst the illustrious photographic materials manufacturers as to whether film is dead or not. One day this or that
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 29, 2010
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      Hi Folks

      There seems to be some confusion amongst the illustrious photographic materials manufacturers as to whether film is dead or not. One day this or that film is made extinct and then up pops a new film?? What is going on?
      However, the bigger question is, if you have gone fully digital (or have never been anything other) do you really know your camera? I am not refering to whether you know how many shooting modes it has or the baffling array of metering modes but how the sensor responds.
      Expert film users knew from calibration what their film was capable of in terms of dynamic range; but do digital users have the same depth of knowledge about the DSLR being used?
      I throw this open to debate from the members of this group.

      Regards

      Les Meehan
      Zone2Tone - creative photography learning centre.
    • J Bryan Kramer
      I have never used the modes on my DSLR, if you mean the sports mode ect. I jumped right to the creative modes aperture and shutter priority and manual. As
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 3, 2010
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        I have never used the modes on my DSLR, if you mean the sports mode ect. I jumped right to the 'creative' modes aperture and shutter priority and manual. As for the other settings there are a LOT more on a DSLR than any film SLR ever had. When I got my first DSLR, a Canon XT, I went thru a chapter in the manual in a week, practicing the material covered in the chapter. Now that I have an even more complicated model, the 5D2 I need to do the same.

        BK


        “In photography there is a reality so subtle that it becomes more real than reality."
         ----- Alfred Stieglitz

        J Bryan Krämer       North Florida, USA
        photos at: http://pbase.com/photoburner
        blog at: http://www.photoburner.net


        On Wed, Sep 29, 2010 at 15:29, Les <zone2tone@...> wrote:


        Hi Folks

        There seems to be some confusion amongst the illustrious photographic materials manufacturers as to whether film is dead or not. One day this or that film is made extinct and then up pops a new film?? What is going on?
        However, the bigger question is, if you have gone fully digital (or have never been anything other) do you really know your camera? I am not refering to whether you know how many shooting modes it has or the baffling array of metering modes but how the sensor responds.
        Expert film users knew from calibration what their film was capable of in terms of dynamic range; but do digital users have the same depth of knowledge about the DSLR being used?
        I throw this open to debate from the members of this group.

        Regards

        Les Meehan
        Zone2Tone - creative photography learning centre.



      • Baume Foto
         I m at almost 30,000 shutter actuations on my main camera, plus about 20,000 on my back up camera. I know what kind of performance to expect in sunny,
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 3, 2010
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           I'm at almost 30,000 shutter actuations on my main camera, plus about 20,000 on my back up camera. I know what kind of performance to expect in sunny, cloudy, dark, studio, whatever setting--shooting almost exclusively manual model.  I would say with digital technology, we find our limits quicker, because we're not as limited.... in that regard, I'm intimately aware of my camera's capabilities.  Back in the film days, when I was shooting slides I was less apt to experiment because of lack of latitude in exposre and it was expensive.
          ___________________________
          Evan  Baumhofer alias "Baume"

          mobile: 402-889-8032
          baume_fotoarte@...
           


          --- On Sun, 10/3/10, J Bryan Kramer <codeburner@...> wrote:

          From: J Bryan Kramer <codeburner@...>
          Subject: Re: [photographic-techniques] Do you know your DSLR as intimately as film experts knew their film?
          To: photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sunday, October 3, 2010, 12:17 PM

           
          I have never used the modes on my DSLR, if you mean the sports mode ect. I jumped right to the 'creative' modes aperture and shutter priority and manual. As for the other settings there are a LOT more on a DSLR than any film SLR ever had. When I got my first DSLR, a Canon XT, I went thru a chapter in the manual in a week, practicing the material covered in the chapter. Now that I have an even more complicated model, the 5D2 I need to do the same.

          BK


          “In photography there is a reality so subtle that it becomes more real than reality."
           ----- Alfred Stieglitz

          J Bryan Krämer       North Florida, USA
          photos at: http://pbase.com/photoburner
          blog at: http://www.photoburner.net


          On Wed, Sep 29, 2010 at 15:29, Les <zone2tone@...> wrote:


          Hi Folks

          There seems to be some confusion amongst the illustrious photographic materials manufacturers as to whether film is dead or not. One day this or that film is made extinct and then up pops a new film?? What is going on?
          However, the bigger question is, if you have gone fully digital (or have never been anything other) do you really know your camera? I am not refering to whether you know how many shooting modes it has or the baffling array of metering modes but how the sensor responds.
          Expert film users knew from calibration what their film was capable of in terms of dynamic range; but do digital users have the same depth of knowledge about the DSLR being used?
          I throw this open to debate from the members of this group.

          Regards

          Les Meehan
          Zone2Tone - creative photography learning centre.




        • Dan Mancuso
          I just picked up a film Camera again.. re-markedly, it is one of the same cameras I had back in the day (a Pentax ME Super)... Winder, zoom lenses, light
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 3, 2010
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            I just picked up a "film Camera" again.. re-markedly, it is one of the same cameras I had back in the day (a Pentax ME Super)...  Winder, zoom lenses, light meter (granted far better than what i had back then, a Sekonic L398)

            The color film I load is pretty much the same as the C-41 I used then, 'cept it is ASA400 rather than 100, but the grain is actually better than the 100 of the day.  The Black and White is the same old Tri-X 400... no change at all...  The Slide film I haven't finished the roll yet.

            You may be able to tell...   I shot film (and a LOT of it back in the 70's and a bit into the 80's.  I don't member when I picked up my first Digital camera...  it was a curiosity... it was cool, it was immediate (well computers really were not ready for them yet)  But as the cameras improved and the computers needed to work with them the way I could work with film in the darkroom...  Digital got more Interesting...

            Eventually many aspects of Digital began to exceed Film... some became comparable, creatively and artistically. But, Film still can do things that Digital cannot...  just like it did in the early days of Digital Audio...  The day will come when Digital Cameras will do all that film can and be as cheap as digital audio devices are now... but even as such...  Digital has replaced film. even on the high end.  but...  I like to think, with a 35mm camera, and a scanner that can scan at 4800dpi (common) I am packing a 35megapixel camera...  but more than that...  I still enjoy the hell outta film!
            ***This Email may contain errors I was not aware of when typed.
            ***As a result, my message may not say what I originally meant.

            On 9/29/2010 3:29 PM, Les wrote:
             

            Hi Folks

            There seems to be some confusion amongst the illustrious photographic materials manufacturers as to whether film is dead or not. One day this or that film is made extinct and then up pops a new film?? What is going on?
            However, the bigger question is, if you have gone fully digital (or have never been anything other) do you really know your camera? I am not refering to whether you know how many shooting modes it has or the baffling array of metering modes but how the sensor responds.
            Expert film users knew from calibration what their film was capable of in terms of dynamic range; but do digital users have the same depth of knowledge about the DSLR being used?
            I throw this open to debate from the members of this group.

            Regards

            Les Meehan
            Zone2Tone - creative photography learning centre.

          • Les
            Thanks to you all for replying. I would agree that DSLRs give us many creative options not available to the film camera (as a lifelong exponent of the zone
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 10, 2010
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              Thanks to you all for replying. I would agree that DSLRs give us many creative options not available to the film camera (as a lifelong exponent of the zone system I now love the ease with which I can control high contrast with multiple exposures using digital). I saw a piece in the British Journal of Photography where Kodak see the workflow for film users as colour neg/scan/photoshop which is something large format users have been doing for some time. It will be interesting to see how things go in the future.
              Now, if we can see a 6x7 digital Mamiya for the 500 pounds I original paid for my film version camera (a RB67 Pro-S and still performing suberbly) 30 years ago I will be a happy bunny! The price of digital cameras is still outrageous, especially at medium format.
              Cheers

              --- In photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com, Dan Mancuso <danm@...> wrote:
              >
              > I just picked up a "film Camera" again.. re-markedly, it is one of the
              > same cameras I had back in the day (a Pentax ME Super)... Winder, zoom
              > lenses, light meter (granted far better than what i had back then, a
              > Sekonic L398)
              >
              > The color film I load is pretty much the same as the C-41 I used then,
              > 'cept it is ASA400 rather than 100, but the grain is actually better
              > than the 100 of the day. The Black and White is the same old Tri-X
              > 400... no change at all... The Slide film I haven't finished the roll yet.
              >
              > You may be able to tell... I shot film (and a LOT of it back in the
              > 70's and a bit into the 80's. I don't member when I picked up my first
              > Digital camera... it was a curiosity... it was cool, it was immediate
              > (well computers really were not ready for them yet) But as the cameras
              > improved and the computers needed to work with them the way I could work
              > with film in the darkroom... Digital got more Interesting...
              >
              > Eventually many aspects of Digital began to exceed Film... some became
              > comparable, creatively and artistically. But, Film still can do things
              > that Digital cannot... just like it did in the early days of Digital
              > Audio... The day will come when Digital Cameras will do all that film
              > can and be as cheap as digital audio devices are now... but even as
              > such... Digital has replaced film. even on the high end. but... I
              > like to think, with a 35mm camera, and a scanner that can scan at
              > 4800dpi (common) I am packing a 35megapixel camera... but more than
              > that... I still enjoy the hell outta film!
              >
              > ***This Email may contain errors I was not aware of when typed.
              > ***As a result, my message may not say what I originally meant.
              >
              >
              > On 9/29/2010 3:29 PM, Les wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi Folks
              > >
              > > There seems to be some confusion amongst the illustrious photographic
              > > materials manufacturers as to whether film is dead or not. One day
              > > this or that film is made extinct and then up pops a new film?? What
              > > is going on?
              > > However, the bigger question is, if you have gone fully digital (or
              > > have never been anything other) do you really know your camera? I am
              > > not refering to whether you know how many shooting modes it has or the
              > > baffling array of metering modes but how the sensor responds.
              > > Expert film users knew from calibration what their film was capable of
              > > in terms of dynamic range; but do digital users have the same depth of
              > > knowledge about the DSLR being used?
              > > I throw this open to debate from the members of this group.
              > >
              > > Regards
              > >
              > > Les Meehan
              > > Zone2Tone <http://zone2tone.co.uk/mail_list/?p=subscribe&id=1> -
              > > creative photography learning centre.
              > >
              > >
              >
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