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filters (was black & white yada yada yada)

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  • Baume Foto
    Hey Brian, I am a get it right in the camera kind of guy most of the time.  I still use CP and warming filters on my glass, and from time to time a split ND
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 1, 2009
      Hey Brian, I am a "get it right in the camera" kind of guy most of the time.  I still use CP and warming filters on my glass, and from time to time a split ND as well. 
      ______________________________Evan  Baumhofer alias "Baume"

      www.baumefoto.zenfolio.commobile: 402-547-9877
      baume_fotoarte@...
       

      --- On Sat, 9/26/09, Brian Lunergan <ff809@...> wrote:

      From: Brian Lunergan <ff809@...>
      Subject: Re: [photographic-techniques] Digital Photography Secrets For Black And White Shots
      To: photographic-techniques@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, September 26, 2009, 12:46 PM













       





      J Bryan Kramer wrote:

      > The in camera conversion uses a fixed channel selection: 40% R and 30% G and

      > B IIRC. Rarely the best choice.

      >

      > BK

      >

      > On Sat, Sep 26, 2009 at 10:00, Baume Foto <baume_fotoarte@ yahoo.com> wrote:

      >

      >> the two methods I use to convert to black and white1) shoot RAW. not only

      >> does shooting in raw format give me a lot of exposure latitude, but it also

      >> gives me the chance to manipulate saturation. I can do this before I've

      >> even opened a picture in photoshop. nice, huh?

      >> 2) using CS3, I use the image adjust - Black & White function, selecting

      >> each color channel for the best desired effect. You could also go with

      >> "desaturate" or even hue/saturation. there are always more than one way to

      >> accomplish something.

      >>

      >> ____________ _________ _________ Evan Baumhofer alias "Baume"

      >>

      >> www.baumefoto. zenfolio. commobile: 402-547-9877

      >> baume_fotoarte@ yahoo.com

      >>

      >>

      >> --- On Sat, 9/26/09, J Bryan Kramer <codeburner@gmail. com> wrote:

      >>

      >> From: J Bryan Kramer <codeburner@gmail. com>

      >> Subject: Re: [photographic- techniques] Digital Photography Secrets For

      >> Black And White Shots

      >> To: photographic- techniques@ yahoogroups. com

      >> Date: Saturday, September 26, 2009, 8:06 AM

      >>

      >> You should be doing the B&W conversion in post production since there are

      >> -many- ways to do it and the way that the camera would do it is rarely even

      >> close to the best way. And doing the conversion in the camera means you are

      >> shooting jpegs which is not good either.



      Agreeing for the moment that the in-camera method runs a distant second to

      what can be done in Photoshop and the like, I would propose that on-camera

      (rather than in-camera) filters that proved their worth in the days of film

      still have a place in digital photography and quite possibly can do a

      better job on a shot, cutting the time at the keyboard afterwards. I'll

      take the risk on putting the noses of the post-pro mavens seriously out of

      joint by suggesting they can mimic but not equal the resulting image.



      --

      Brian Lunergan

      Nepean, Ontario

      Canada


































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