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Studio Table Top Lighting Tips Needed

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  • sfzjohn37205
    I m doing some work for a fabric artist. The artist likes a graduated background effect behind her art pieces. I ve used a gradient in Photoshop to emulate the
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 4, 2008
      I'm doing some work for a fabric artist. The artist likes a graduated
      background effect behind her art pieces. I've used a gradient in
      Photoshop to emulate the effect. I'd rather do it with the lighting
      and in camera. I must have been out to lunch when Skip Jackson the
      instructor, did this in his lighting class at Nashville State
      Community College

      Here's the desired (Photoshopped) effect:
      http://www.pbase.com/sfzjohn/image/92534796/original

      Here's an out of the camera of the same shot:
      http://www.pbase.com/sfzjohn/image/92534795/original

      I'm looking for tips and tricks of folks who've done this type of
      effect in a studio setting.

      I have a 4' X 4' tabletop with about 6'-10' of space behind the table
      that I can use for light fall off purposes. I assume I'd be as close
      to the subject with the lights as possible for max falloff.

      What suggestions do you have for light modifiers on the strobes?

      How would you place the strobes?

      Would flagging help?

      Anything along these lines and things I haven't thought about would
      be most helpful.

      Thanks,

      John Ford
      www.pbase.com/sfzjohn
    • Book Worm
      Hi, You can buy backgrounds with the gradient colour already printed on them. Paul __________________________________________________________ Sent from Yahoo!
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 4, 2008
        Hi,

        You can buy backgrounds with the gradient colour already printed on them.

        Paul


        __________________________________________________________
        Sent from Yahoo! Mail - a smarter inbox http://uk.mail.yahoo.com


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Greg Vincent
        Hi John, Have a look here http://www.potters.org/subject32979.htm and scroll down to the first paragraph of the last entry (by jcullen845) where he talks about
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 4, 2008
          Hi John,

          Have a look here http://www.potters.org/subject32979.htm and scroll down to the first paragraph of the last entry (by jcullen845) where he talks about using the softbox to create the shadow (light fall-off), most likely by 'feathering' the softbox. I think you will want to try to stretch out that background of yours so it makes a very low sweep, rising only high enough to provide a background for your subject - perhaps supported by a sheet of plywood to keep it straight.

          A staggered stack of ND filters on your background light (or main light if it also serves to light the background) should help to accelerate the light fall-off, but I don't have any personal experience doing that

          Regards,

          Greg

          > From: "sfzjohn37205" <johnpford@...>
          > I'm doing some work for a fabric artist. The artist likes a graduated
          > background effect behind her art pieces. I've used a gradient in
          > Photoshop to emulate the effect. I'd rather do it with the lighting
          > and in camera. I must have been out to lunch when Skip Jackson the
          > instructor, did this in his lighting class at Nashville State
          > Community College
          >
          > Here's the desired (Photoshopped) effect:
          > http://www.pbase.com/sfzjohn/image/92534796/original
          >
          > Here's an out of the camera of the same shot:
          > http://www.pbase.com/sfzjohn/image/92534795/original
          >
          > I'm looking for tips and tricks of folks who've done this type of
          > effect in a studio setting.
          >
          > I have a 4' X 4' tabletop with about 6'-10' of space behind the table
          > that I can use for light fall off purposes. I assume I'd be as close
          > to the subject with the lights as possible for max falloff.
          >
          > What suggestions do you have for light modifiers on the strobes?
          >
          > How would you place the strobes?
          >
          > Would flagging help?
          >
          > Anything along these lines and things I haven't thought about would
          > be most helpful.
        • J Bryan Kramer
          I think if you are trying to do this solely with light then you need a two stop drop off from black to white. BK ... -- I know I shall be castigated by a
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 4, 2008
            I think if you are trying to do this solely with light then you need a two
            stop drop off from black to white.

            BK

            On Feb 4, 2008 2:32 PM, sfzjohn37205 <johnpford@...> wrote:

            > I'm doing some work for a fabric artist. The artist likes a graduated
            > background effect behind her art pieces. I've used a gradient in
            > Photoshop to emulate the effect. I'd rather do it with the lighting
            > and in camera. I must have been out to lunch when Skip Jackson the
            > instructor, did this in his lighting class at Nashville State
            > Community College
            >
            > Here's the desired (Photoshopped) effect:
            > http://www.pbase.com/sfzjohn/image/92534796/original
            >
            > Here's an out of the camera of the same shot:
            > http://www.pbase.com/sfzjohn/image/92534795/original
            >
            > I'm looking for tips and tricks of folks who've done this type of
            > effect in a studio setting.
            >
            > I have a 4' X 4' tabletop with about 6'-10' of space behind the table
            > that I can use for light fall off purposes. I assume I'd be as close
            > to the subject with the lights as possible for max falloff.
            >
            > What suggestions do you have for light modifiers on the strobes?
            >
            > How would you place the strobes?
            >
            > Would flagging help?
            >
            > Anything along these lines and things I haven't thought about would
            > be most helpful.
            >
            > Thanks,
            >
            > John Ford
            > www.pbase.com/sfzjohn
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Photographic Techniques
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >


            --
            "I know I shall be castigated by a large group of people today, but I
            was trained to assume that art related to the elusive quality of beauty and
            that the purpose of art was concerned with the elevation of the spirit"
            Ansel Adams


            J Bryan Kramer
            North Florida, USA
            photos at:
            http://pbase.com/photoburner


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Baume FotoArte
            you could also use black seamless paper (it has some reflective quality) to get a gradient. control the background light with barn doors or a snoot. Greg
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 4, 2008
              you could also use black seamless paper (it has some reflective quality) to get a gradient. control the background light with barn doors or a snoot.

              Greg Vincent <gvincent@...> wrote:
              Hi John,

              Have a look here http://www.potters.org/subject32979.htm and scroll down to the first paragraph of the last entry (by jcullen845) where he talks about using the softbox to create the shadow (light fall-off), most likely by 'feathering' the softbox. I think you will want to try to stretch out that background of yours so it makes a very low sweep, rising only high enough to provide a background for your subject - perhaps supported by a sheet of plywood to keep it straight.

              A staggered stack of ND filters on your background light (or main light if it also serves to light the background) should help to accelerate the light fall-off, but I don't have any personal experience doing that

              Regards,

              Greg

              > From: "sfzjohn37205" <johnpford@...>
              > I'm doing some work for a fabric artist. The artist likes a graduated
              > background effect behind her art pieces. I've used a gradient in
              > Photoshop to emulate the effect. I'd rather do it with the lighting
              > and in camera. I must have been out to lunch when Skip Jackson the
              > instructor, did this in his lighting class at Nashville State
              > Community College
              >
              > Here's the desired (Photoshopped) effect:
              > http://www.pbase.com/sfzjohn/image/92534796/original
              >
              > Here's an out of the camera of the same shot:
              > http://www.pbase.com/sfzjohn/image/92534795/original
              >
              > I'm looking for tips and tricks of folks who've done this type of
              > effect in a studio setting.
              >
              > I have a 4' X 4' tabletop with about 6'-10' of space behind the table
              > that I can use for light fall off purposes. I assume I'd be as close
              > to the subject with the lights as possible for max falloff.
              >
              > What suggestions do you have for light modifiers on the strobes?
              >
              > How would you place the strobes?
              >
              > Would flagging help?
              >
              > Anything along these lines and things I haven't thought about would
              > be most helpful.





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