Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Photoshop subscription

Expand Messages
  • karl shah-jenner
    ... look at games to see what is happening with software / money/consumers, games have been one of the major driving forces behind computer hardware advances,
    Message 1 of 21 , May 16, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      >> Forgive me if many of you know about this. Was probably mentioned before.
      >> Google it and it also shows many other links
      >
      > http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-05-14/adobe-angers-users-with-its
      > -savvy-reckless-photoshop-subscription-plan


      look at games to see what is happening with software / money/consumers,
      games have been one of the major driving forces behind computer hardware
      advances, especially video cards, as well as pushing the upgrade cycle and
      the subscription model. (the pRon industry is similarly the largest driver
      of internet innovation - online banking as well as much that we recognise as
      'standard' internet stuff wouldn't exist without them but we shan't talk
      about them)

      Games are also one of the biggest moneymakers there is pulling more $$ than
      the entire movie industry in recent years. I'm sure Adobe like many
      software companies is looking at the games industry to see how they rake it
      in.

      Some games are buy once and play forever, others were subscription, then you
      have the likes of Blizzard's money monster - World of Warcraft. buy buy buy
      buy and buy the game AND subscribe. Sure - apologists argue that they have
      a vast infrastructure to support as well as all the teams of developers
      working on new things.. but those teams of developers are not so much
      coders anymore as psychologists - and that is not an exaggeration.

      pay for part one, then the expansion, then the next, next and the next
      ne - Oh, and you pretty much need to have bought all of them to play, and
      THEN pay $15 a month. You've already paid around $350 in just buying the
      game, now start paying to play it... That sticks in some players throats.
      Especially when one of their earlier games, Diablo II you bought once and a
      decade on you are STILL able to play online on their servers for free. The
      newest incarnation of Diablo requires you to be connected to the internet
      'for validation purposes' even if you are playing single player.. that is -
      all by your lonesome. If the internet is down or they are having issues at
      their end - tough luck, you can't play. but then the defenders will point
      to the WoW 'play for free' version. a crippled teaser of the game which
      includes just enough to suck you in but not enough to make the experience
      worthwhile... so people put their hand in their pockets once hooked and the
      money bleed begins.

      So yeah, my guess is Adobe looked at this vile model and decided 'yup, we
      want in on that'.

      I'll bet they're already advertising for the psychologists to add in-game...
      er, in-program 'advanced features' to make it seem worthwhile. I wouldn't
      be surprised if Adobe has looked at their loyalists and thought 'heck,
      they're a lot like Warcraft loyalists, ready to promote and defend our
      product without us paying them a cent!'

      Adobe won't have looked at the massive decline in the Warcraft player base
      that's resulted from their substandard and frequent expansions (upgrades)
      and they will overlook the fury and resentment that has turned loyal players
      into vocal critics once they cottoned on to the fact the game is THE most
      expensive game ever. The loyalists and newcomers will still valiantly
      defend the game citing the complexity of it all and the resources that
      *must* be consumed to keep it all going.

      There's another game model emerging of late which players refer to as 'pay
      to win' - you buy or get the game free, play for free but if you want to
      unlock advanced features you pay a small amount.. it's always small, but it
      gets the player used to sticking their hand in their pocket and there's
      always much to buy. Games like Mech Warrior do this. In the end a player
      can spend substantial amounts of money for these little features but it
      gives them an advantage over everyone else in the game. Adobe could
      incorporate features like this in their model as well and I would be
      surprised if they weren't looking into it. 'Special' features that aren't
      accessed all the time could be used for a small additional fee when needed.

      But the fact is Game companies like Blizzard have raked it in hand over fist
      and they got used to steadily increasing profits and when the game reached
      it's natural plateau (all markets eventually saturate), they pushed even
      harder to make more money and now they are paying the price as players drop
      away and look elsewhere for more affordable and satisfying alternatives.

      Blizzard may look unstoppable, with games that dominate the landscape, but
      since the advent of the computer game market well over 200 very large games
      companies have been wiped off the map. These were big players!

      Conversely, Bill Gates made rather a lot of money with the Windows OS.. and
      his stance bordered on pro-piracy. He figured people are going to use
      operating systems they don't buy and he decided he's prefer they used his
      rather than a competitors. Well that worked out nicely for him in the end
      with his operating systems dominating the world. Adobe seem to view this as
      naive..


      When Adobe bring this model in and you find yourself unwilling to support
      their lavish demands just remember - Paintshop Pro has been a cheaper and
      sophisticated alternative to Photoshop for quite some time, with the added
      advantage that it can work with both bitmap and raster images - many
      standalone programs exist that exceede photoshops abilities, and a lot of
      the internals of photoshop which caused people to 'upgrade' are available
      for free. I refer to the likes of 'content aware image resizing' -
      something that excited many a PS buyer was already available for over a year
      as a free standalone program from the developer. Many resizing algorithms
      that blitz PS lay littering the web, noise reduction, gross image editors,
      unshake, 3D creators.. so much is there for free without paying a cent. Or
      just do not 'upgrade' - there's many a fine computer jockey out there
      producing stunning results with ancient versions of Photoshop, just as many
      of those images we still hold in such high esteem were made with old wooden
      cameras and junk glass lenses.

      k
    • Randy Little
      They already have people saying NO. Because you lose access to all your work once you miss a payment. games are starting to lose money. WOW lost over a
      Message 2 of 21 , May 16, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        They already have people saying NO. Because you lose access to all your work once you miss a payment.    games are starting to lose money.  WOW lost over a million players last quarter.    They things you site about the movie industry are in accurate in that it only takes into account theatre tickets and not total income over life of the product.   typically 10x the box office sells. 




        On Thu, May 16, 2013 at 10:49 PM, karl shah-jenner <shahjen@...> wrote:
        Forgive me if many of you know about this. Was probably mentioned before.
        Google it and it also shows many other links

        http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-05-14/adobe-angers-users-with-its
        -savvy-reckless-photoshop-subscription-plan


        look at games to see what is happening with software / money/consumers, games have been one of the major driving forces behind computer hardware advances, especially video cards, as well as pushing the upgrade cycle and the subscription model. (the pRon industry is similarly the largest driver of internet innovation - online banking as well as much that we recognise as 'standard' internet stuff  wouldn't exist without them but we shan't talk about them)

        Games are also one of the biggest moneymakers there is pulling more $$ than the entire movie industry in recent years.  I'm sure Adobe like many software companies is looking at the games industry to see how they rake it in.

        Some games are buy once and play forever, others were subscription, then you have the likes of Blizzard's money monster - World of Warcraft.  buy buy buy buy and buy the game AND subscribe.  Sure - apologists argue that they have a vast infrastructure to support as well as all the teams of developers working on new things..  but those teams of developers are not so much coders anymore as psychologists - and that is not an exaggeration.

        pay for part one, then the expansion, then the next, next and the next ne  - Oh, and you pretty much need to have bought all of them to play, and THEN pay $15 a month.  You've already paid around $350 in just buying the game, now start paying to play it...    That sticks in some players throats. Especially when one of their earlier games, Diablo II you bought once and a decade on you are STILL able to play online on their servers for free.  The newest incarnation of Diablo requires you to be connected to the internet 'for validation purposes' even if you are playing single player.. that is - all by your lonesome.  If the internet is down or they are having issues at their end - tough luck, you can't play.   but then the defenders will point to the WoW 'play for free' version.  a crippled teaser of the game which includes just enough to suck you in but not enough to make the experience worthwhile... so people put their hand in their pockets once hooked and the money bleed begins.

        So yeah, my guess is Adobe looked at this vile model and decided 'yup, we want in on that'.

        I'll bet they're already advertising for the psychologists to add in-game... er, in-program 'advanced features' to make it seem worthwhile.  I wouldn't be surprised if Adobe has looked at their loyalists and thought 'heck, they're a lot like Warcraft loyalists, ready to promote and defend our product without us paying them a cent!'

        Adobe won't have looked at the massive decline in the Warcraft player base that's resulted from their substandard  and frequent expansions (upgrades) and they will overlook the fury and resentment that has turned loyal players into vocal critics once they cottoned on to the fact the game is THE most expensive game ever.  The loyalists and newcomers will still valiantly defend the game citing the complexity of it all and the resources that *must* be consumed to keep it all going.

        There's another game model emerging of late which players refer to as 'pay to win' - you buy or get the game free, play for free but if you want to unlock advanced features you pay a small amount.. it's always small, but it gets the player used to sticking their hand in their pocket and there's always much to buy.  Games like Mech Warrior do this.  In the end a player can spend substantial amounts of money for these little features but it gives them an advantage over everyone else in the game.  Adobe could incorporate features like this in their model as well and I would be surprised if they weren't looking into it.  'Special' features that aren't accessed all the time could be used for a small additional fee when needed.

        But the fact is Game companies like Blizzard have raked it in hand over fist and they got used to steadily increasing profits and when the game reached it's natural plateau (all markets eventually saturate), they pushed even harder to make more money and now they are paying the price as players drop away and look elsewhere for more affordable and satisfying alternatives.

        Blizzard may look unstoppable, with games that dominate the landscape, but since the advent of the computer game market well over 200 very large games companies have been wiped off the map.  These were big players!

        Conversely, Bill Gates made rather a lot of money with the Windows  OS.. and his stance bordered on pro-piracy.  He figured people are going to use operating systems they don't buy and he decided he's prefer they used his rather than a competitors.  Well that worked out nicely for him in the end with his operating systems dominating the world.  Adobe seem to view this as naive..


        When Adobe bring this model in and you find yourself unwilling to support their lavish demands just remember - Paintshop Pro has been a cheaper and sophisticated alternative to Photoshop for quite some time, with the added advantage that it can work with both bitmap and raster images - many standalone programs exist that exceede photoshops abilities, and a lot of the internals of photoshop which caused people to 'upgrade' are available for free.  I refer to the likes of 'content aware image resizing' - something that excited many a PS buyer was already available for over a year as a free standalone program from the developer.  Many resizing algorithms that blitz PS lay littering the web,  noise reduction, gross image editors, unshake, 3D creators.. so much is there for free without paying a cent.  Or just do not 'upgrade' - there's many a fine computer jockey out there producing stunning results with ancient versions of Photoshop, just as many of those images we still hold in such high esteem were made with old wooden cameras and junk glass lenses.

        k





      • karl shah-jenner
        ... seems you re right Despite the continued posting of losses in the US market, according to a Reuters report, the gaming industry is projected to hit $70
        Message 3 of 21 , May 16, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          > They things you site about the
          > movie industry are in accurate in that it only takes into account theatre
          > tickets and not total income over life of the product. typically 10x the
          > box office sells.

          seems you're right

          Despite the continued posting of losses in the US market, according to a
          Reuters report, the gaming industry is projected to hit $70 billion,
          globally, up from $65 billion in 2011.

          Adding the sale of mobile games on smartphones and tablets, which show
          continued growth, the total value of the global video game industry is
          projected to be $78.5 billion for 2012.

          Citing DFC Intelligence figures, Reuters reported in June that revenue from
          global retail software sales (physical game sales) is likely to drop to $28
          billion, down from $29.5 billion in 2011.

          Online revenue, however - including digital delivery, subscriptions and
          Facebook games - are expected to rise to $24 billion, up from $18 billion in
          2011.

          Games vs Movies

          ..movies still outweighs its gaming rival by some margin. In 2012, the
          global movie production and distribution industry is projected to generate
          revenue of $126.8 billion, showing annualised growth of 0.8% for the past
          five years

          - http://businesstech.co.za/news/general/19901/games-vs-movies-who-wins/





          I'd been reading stats on a different site which contradicted the videogame
          sales V movies.

          http://vgsales.wikia.com/wiki/Video_game_industry

          The U.S. video game industry boomed in the early 2000s and became one of the
          leading forms of entertainment in terms of total revenue. Presently, the
          industry is at around $22 billion for 2008 (conservative estimate) in the US
          and $30 to $40 billion globally. Here is how it compares with other
          entertainment industries.

          a.. Music industry - $10.4 billion (US 2008)[35] and $30 to $40 billion
          globally [36][37]
          b.. Movie industry - $9.5 billion (US)[38] and $27 billion globally.[39]
          c.. Book industry - $35.69 billion (US 2007) [40] and roughly $63 billion
          globally (2002) (Euromonitor Intl)
          d.. DVD industry - $23 billion (US)[41] (buying $16B, renting $7B)
          It surpassed the U.S. movie and music industry in 2005 and 2007
          respectively.
        • PhotoRoy6@...
          Jan, How many did you sell? In a message dated 5/16/2013 9:46:31 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, jan@artfaul.com writes: They had to do it. Do you have any idea of
          Message 4 of 21 , May 17, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Jan, How many did you sell?
             
            In a message dated 5/16/2013 9:46:31 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, jan@... writes:
            They had to do it. Do you have any idea of how many counterfeit copies of Photoshop there are? I’d be willing to bet that it is somewhere close to 100 million.
             
          • Jan Faul
            The reason the Titanic sank was due to overload of pirated PS7’s. By filling the holds and crew quarters we managed to fit 47,876.621 owner kits into the
            Message 5 of 21 , May 17, 2013
            • 0 Attachment

              The reason the Titanic sank was due to overload of pirated PS7’s. By filling the holds and crew quarters we managed to fit 47,876.621 owner kits into the ship. But  then that fool had to hit an iceberg. Or do I have it confused with the Exxon Valdez?
               


              On May 17, 2013, at 9:55 AM, PhotoRoy6@... wrote:

              Jan, How many did you sell?
               
              In a message dated 5/16/2013 9:46:31 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, jan@... writes:
              They had to do it. Do you have any idea of how many counterfeit copies of Photoshop there are? I’d be willing to bet that it is somewhere close to 100 million.
               


              Art Faul

              The Artist Formerly Known as Prints
              ------
              Stills That Move: http://www.artfaul.com
              Camera Works - The Washington Post
              art for cars: panowraps.com
              .





            • Jan Faul
              http://designtaxi.com/news/357648/World-s-First-Caffeinated-Toothbrush-Releases-Caffeine-As-You-Brush/ Art Faul The Artist Formerly Known as Prints ... Stills
              Message 6 of 21 , May 17, 2013
              • 0 Attachment

                http://designtaxi.com/news/357648/World-s-First-Caffeinated-Toothbrush-Releases-Caffeine-As-You-Brush/

                Art Faul

                The Artist Formerly Known as Prints
                ------
                Stills That Move: http://www.artfaul.com
                Greenshttp://www.inkjetprince.com
                Camera Works - The Washington Post
                http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/photo/battlefieldparks/front_qt.htm
                ArtNet: http://www.artnet.com/artists/jan+w.-faul/
                art for cars: panowraps.com
                .





              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.