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Re: PF Exhibits on 01-31-04

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  • LScottPht@aol.com
    Thanks, Andy! It seems as if that was the problem. Leslie Spurlock http://americanphotojournalist.com/member.php?user=lscotthpht 214-361-5152 888-381-0854
    Message 1 of 17 , Feb 1 6:25 AM
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      Thanks, Andy! It seems as if that was the problem.

      Leslie Spurlock
      http://americanphotojournalist.com/member.php?user=lscotthpht
      214-361-5152
      888-381-0854

      << Try emptying your machine's cache. The new photograph was indeed installed
      this week. This is a common report from exhibitors. Not that the staff is
      infallible but most times it is a result of the computer picking up the image
      from its cache since for a given author it has the same name, spurlock-1.jpg
      for the larger one and sopurlock-1m.jpg for the small one, from week to week.
      This is the "convention" I use because trying to keep track of images by
      title
      or date or such would be a headache.
      >>
    • LScottPht@aol.com
      John- Thanks for the comment. I hope the bit of cloth doesn t hurt the image too much. I don t pose any of my subjects, and I photograph them the way they are
      Message 2 of 17 , Feb 1 6:39 AM
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        John-
        Thanks for the comment. I hope the bit of cloth doesn't hurt the image too
        much. I don't pose any of my subjects, and I photograph them the way they are
        and don't disturb them if at all possible. So, I couldn't move the bit of
        cloth. I am also a real purist in the sense that I don't do any manipulation...only
        available light, no filters, and, almost always, no cropping. Anyway, this is
        just an explanation for the distracting elements in the last 2 pics. Since I
        am just getting into photojournalism, my real passion, is there anyone in this
        forum that sees things from a photojournalism standpoint? If so, are these
        elements equally as distracting for someone in this field? I'm wondering because
        I have so much still to learn in that field and would appreciate any advice.
        I also know that what appeals to someone with a pj/documentary shot is
        different from someone who might be interested in a different type of photography.
        Now, I am not saying that the shots would work in pj/doc., I am just trying to
        find out if they would.

        Leslie Spurlock
        <A HREF="http://americanphotojournalist.com/member.php?user=lscotthpht">
        American Photojournalist</A>
        214-361-5152
        888-381-0854

        << Leslie Spurlock, Faith and Hope. A strong, evocative image that is
        disturbed and somewhat neutralized by that bit of cloth with the threads
        spreading out from it, onto the figure's chin. The distraction is
        inevitable. >>
      • John Palcewski
        Leslie, I remember when I started out a long time ago it really upset me when I saw--to my dismay--some flaw or other, like for instance, a tree growing out of
        Message 3 of 17 , Feb 1 7:54 AM
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          Leslie, I remember when I started out a long time ago it really upset me
          when I saw--to my dismay--some flaw or other, like for instance, a tree
          growing out of someone's head that I didn't see when I was making the image.
          The best cure for that is to just keep shooting and vowing not to make the
          same mistakes twice. In time you'll have made them all, and then get pissed
          again when you make some entirely new ones.

          It's good to see that you compose full frame. I think that's important. I
          knew a guy who worked for AP and he said he never bothered with that stuff
          because his editors would crop the pictures, just as long as he got the
          subject somewhere in the frame. To me that's sloppy, uncraftsmanlike.

          I think one of the best things about digital is that you get instant
          feedback, compared to the day or two lag with film processing. Seems to me
          you'll learn quicker. But then on the other hand I think about all my long
          hours in the lab...whoa! Do I feel a nostalgia jag coming on?

          Anyway, keep shooting. That's the thing.

          John
          http://www.livejournal.com/users/forioscribe


          >John-
          >Thanks for the comment. I hope the bit of cloth doesn't hurt the image too
          >much. I don't pose any of my subjects, and I photograph them the way they
          >are
          >and don't disturb them if at all possible. So, I couldn't move the bit of
          >cloth. I am also a real purist in the sense that I don't do any
          >manipulation...only
          >available light, no filters, and, almost always, no cropping. Anyway, this
          >is
          >just an explanation for the distracting elements in the last 2 pics. Since
          >I
          >am just getting into photojournalism, my real passion, is there anyone in
          >this
          >forum that sees things from a photojournalism standpoint? If so, are these
          >elements equally as distracting for someone in this field? I'm wondering
          >because
          >I have so much still to learn in that field and would appreciate any
          >advice.
          >I also know that what appeals to someone with a pj/documentary shot is
          >different from someone who might be interested in a different type of
          >photography.
          >Now, I am not saying that the shots would work in pj/doc., I am just trying
          >to
          >find out if they would.
          >
          >Leslie Spurlock
          ><A HREF="http://americanphotojournalist.com/member.php?user=lscotthpht">
          >American Photojournalist</A>
          >214-361-5152
          >888-381-0854
          >
          ><< Leslie Spurlock, Faith and Hope. A strong, evocative image that is
          > disturbed and somewhat neutralized by that bit of cloth with the threads
          > spreading out from it, onto the figure's chin. The distraction is
          > inevitable. >>
          >

          _________________________________________________________________
          MSN 8 helps eliminate e-mail viruses. Get 2 months FREE*.
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        • Emily L. Ferguson
          As a general rule the ones that win prizes are the ones without compositional or technical flaws in the central area. And, generally, the ones that win prizes
          Message 4 of 17 , Feb 1 11:27 AM
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            As a general rule the ones that win prizes are the ones without
            compositional or technical flaws in the central area.

            And, generally, the ones that win prizes are the ones that show eyes.

            Look at the POY and Capa Award sites, and the Columbia Journalism
            Review site. Check out the digitaljournalist.com. Look at sites of
            famous pjs.

            Here's an interesting site:

            >Photographs from the NH primary season by Concord Monitor staff
            >
            >http://www.primarymonitor.com/gallery/thumbnails.php?album=4
            >--

            Look at the pix on www.VII.com.

            Look at the daily crop of news pix that make it onto the wire. You
            can get there through yahoo news

            And yes, cropping is sort of basic to photojournalism. Column sizes
            don't fit a ratio of 2:3. Even the pro digital cameras have a better
            ratio.
            --
            Emily L. Ferguson
            mailto:elf@...
            508-563-6822
            New England landscapes, wooden boats and races, press photography
            http://www.vsu.cape.com/~elf
          • Emily L. Ferguson
            another photographer to look at is Erik Refner http://www.erikrefner.com Requires java and a I suspect flash to Bob can ignore this link. -- Emily L. Ferguson
            Message 5 of 17 , Feb 1 11:58 AM
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              another photographer to look at is Erik Refner
              http://www.erikrefner.com

              Requires java and a I suspect flash to Bob can ignore this link.
              --
              Emily L. Ferguson
              mailto:elf@...
              508-563-6822
              New England landscapes, wooden boats and races, press photography
              http://www.vsu.cape.com/~elf
            • LScottPht@aol.com
              John- Thanks for the input. I am actually not just starting out in the photography business, just the pj side of things. I have been selling my images for 15
              Message 6 of 17 , Feb 1 12:04 PM
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                John-
                Thanks for the input. I am actually not just starting out in the photography
                business, just the pj side of things. I have been selling my images for 15
                years to big corporations for their corporate art galleries, so I don't make
                mistakes anymore like trees sticking out of heads (although I do remember those
                days!). I just think that the rules are different for photojournalism because
                you are dealing more with realism. Now, that doesn't mean that the cloth is not
                distracting even in photojournalism. That is what I am trying to find out.
                Now, for a portrait, I guess it would be. But, in photojournalism, so much of the
                time you tend to break the rules like having half a blurred face in the
                foreground, an arm sticking out here and there, etc. None of these things would be
                acceptable in other types of photography. Anyway, that's the question I am
                posing. Does the image not work coming from a photojournalism point of view? I
                would love some feedback from someone in the field (John, if you are in the
                field, thanks so much for the feedback and I guess I will have to be more
                conscientious even in pj.).

                << Leslie, I remember when I started out a long time ago it really upset me
                when I saw--to my dismay--some flaw or other, like for instance, a tree
                growing out of someone's head that I didn't see when I was making the image.
                The best cure for that is to just keep shooting and vowing not to make the
                same mistakes twice. In time you'll have made them all, and then get pissed
                again when you make some entirely new ones.
                >>
              • LScottPht@aol.com
                Emily- Thanks for the info. I actually usually show eyes, but I wanted to go for something a little different as on this week s shot. I guess I just didn t
                Message 7 of 17 , Feb 1 12:16 PM
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                  Emily-
                  Thanks for the info. I actually usually show eyes, but I wanted to go for
                  something a little different as on this week's shot. I guess I just didn't
                  realize that showing the girls hair clips (like last week) would be considered a
                  technical or compositional flaw. I was trying to show her eyes, and there was no
                  way to do this without also showing her hair clips. I will remember about the
                  chin, however. By the way, how do you feel about the shot that is up right
                  now, other than the fact that it is not showing her eyes? This is all good
                  feedback, and I appreciate it even though I kind of sound like I am defending myself.

                  << As a general rule the ones that win prizes are the ones without
                  compositional or technical flaws in the central area.

                  And, generally, the ones that win prizes are the ones that show eyes.
                  >>
                • Emily L. Ferguson
                  ... Well, isn t that just so Southern California! And the technique is fun too, and more difficult than it looks. ... Lots of nice stuff in there, even with
                  Message 8 of 17 , Feb 1 3:22 PM
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                    At 11:50 PM -0500 1/30/04, ADavidhazy wrote:
                    >The PhotoForum members' gallery/exhibit space was updated 31 Jan. 04. Authors
                    >with work now on display at http://www.rit.edu/~andpph/gallery.html include:
                    >
                    > Gary Colnar - Regal Theater, Oceanside, CA

                    Well, isn't that just so Southern California! And the technique is
                    fun too, and more difficult than it looks.

                    > Achal Pashine - Sunrise at Old Marina, Mono Lake

                    Lots of nice stuff in there, even with Velvia's heavy handed colors.
                    Every morning a different sunrise.

                    > Trevor Cunningham - Wadi Rum, Morning

                    I guess if you're going to shoot b&w for that sort of shot, you need
                    to identify the time of day when the sunlight will differentiate the
                    rock from the sky and then pray for good clouds. Either that or do a
                    lot of dodging of the rock.

                    > Leslie Spurlock - Faith and Hope

                    I think the thing to do is to find the best shot, rather than being
                    attracted to a specific person. The translucency of the headscarf is
                    a lovely touch. Perhaps if the bandage on the neck had had some tape
                    on it, or that funny center part with yellowness, the rough edge of
                    the bandage would not be so distracting.

                    > Jim Davis - Success!

                    Wow. We can all dream.

                    > Per Ofverbeck - Water

                    A twist of lemon or lime would have been more convincing and then the
                    shot would have been conventional but technically good.

                    > John Mason - UFO, Gambier, Ohio, March 1967

                    The US military does strange things with our money, doesn't it.

                    > Rubin F. Diehl - Wild Flower

                    Bromeliads are pretty amazing, those prickly leaves in a whorl and
                    then that long extravagant spike. To live somewhere where they're
                    wild must be pretty amazing too. Using the corroded copper to
                    emphasize the "wildness" of the plant didn't quite work for me.
                    Somehow the image seems set up more than wild.

                    > Emily L. Ferguson - jack came to visit

                    For John P., the orange glow on the left is my neighbor's back porch light.

                    > Kostas Papakotas - irony

                    Wow, that other photographer sure is difficult to find in the
                    photograph, so the irony doesn't get through to me. A piece of me
                    just wants to get Athens birth control pills for those dirty pigeons!
                    Is the original photograph sharp?

                    > William Downey - C-47 Ghost I remember you

                    Cars, Planes. Yeah, yeah. Guy stuff. (I do love trains.) The cyan
                    is kinda neat as a technique for reinforcing the old-ness of the
                    subject, but without the description I'd never understand why the
                    image was so cyan.

                    > Andrew Davidhazy - Figure

                    Never can figure out what to think of Andy's stuff. Just thankful he
                    lets us have this space on his server and dragoons his students into
                    making our gallery for us every week. What would we do without him!

                    Thanks, everybody.

                    More reviews please.
                    --
                    Emily L. Ferguson
                    mailto:elf@...
                    508-563-6822
                    New England landscapes, wooden boats and races, press photography
                    http://www.vsu.cape.com/~elf
                  • LScottPht@aol.com
                    In a message dated 2/1/04 5:39:17 PM Central Standard Time, elf@cape.com writes:
                    Message 9 of 17 , Feb 1 4:36 PM
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                      In a message dated 2/1/04 5:39:17 PM Central Standard Time, elf@...
                      writes:

                      << Perhaps if the bandage on the neck had had some tape
                      on it, or that funny center part with yellowness, the rough edge of
                      the bandage would not be so distracting. >>

                      Thanks for the comments. Just an fyi, it's not actually a bandage but part of
                      the tie to her scarf. But, I appreciate your comments.

                      Leslie Spurlock
                      http://americanphotojournalist.com/member.php?user=lscotthpht
                      214-361-5152
                      888-381-0854
                    • Emily L. Ferguson
                      Well, I wondered about that. It was so square. Somehow it just didn t look like the tie of the scarf. -- Emily L. Ferguson mailto:elf@cape.com 508-563-6822
                      Message 10 of 17 , Feb 1 4:49 PM
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                        Well, I wondered about that. It was so square. Somehow it just
                        didn't look like the tie of the scarf.
                        --
                        Emily L. Ferguson
                        mailto:elf@...
                        508-563-6822
                        New England landscapes, wooden boats and races, press photography
                        http://www.vsu.cape.com/~elf
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