Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[nyh@math.technion.ac.il: Re: knesset meeting on open source]

Expand Messages
  • Nadav Har'El
    Here is part of message I wrote to linux-il today about free software. It s actually philosophy, so I thought I d repost it here, and see if anyone who knows a
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 15 8:03 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      Here is part of message I wrote to linux-il today about free software.
      It's actually philosophy, so I thought I'd repost it here, and see if
      anyone who knows a bit of philosophy can comment on it (I'm a very small
      philosophy expert, so I may have made gross errors in my analysis).

      ----- Forwarded message from Nadav Har'El <nyh@...> -----
      Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2002 12:09:55 +0300
      From: "Nadav Har'El" <nyh@...>
      To: <linux-il@...>
      Subject: Re: knesset meeting on open source

      ...
      I was using non-free software for years, from commercial versions
      of Unix, a C compiler on a Commodore-64 (cost $100), DOS, Windows,
      Turbo-Pascal, and the list goes on and on. I never used to have anything
      against commercial software, or even Microsoft software (I even programmed on
      DOS a lot).

      But this has gradually changed in the last decade, until I stopped using
      commercial software altogether about 2 years ago. Why? As commercial
      software companies (and especially Microsoft) increased their deployment
      of monopolistic practices, out-of-touch-with-reality pricing schemes,
      and treating their customers as criminals (I once had program which I had to
      look in the printed manual every time I used it, for secret codes! See also
      BSA ads), the more I became disgusted with this whole idea.

      Using Hegel's terms, if the commercial software "thesis" had
      failed, an "anti-thesis" was bound to arise, and indeed it did: free
      software. In the last decade free software has become a more and more
      viable alternative, until a few years ago it even surpassed what commercial
      software had to offer (at least to "hacker"-types like me).

      Obviously, those who know Hegel's philosophy will know that the dialectic
      process does not stop there. In the upcoming years we're going to find
      problems with this anti-thesis (free software) too. Maybe free software
      is not as secure as we thought; maybe it's not as easy-to-use as we would
      want; maybe the whole idea will cause thousands of programmers to lose
      their jobs; and maybe there are other problems with the free software
      concept that we still haven't thought of.

      This is why we're going to have to find a "synthesis" (again, using
      Hegel's terms): a new system that combines the ideas and benefits from
      both the thesis (commercial software) and the antithesis (free software).

      ...


      --
      Nadav Har'El | Monday, Jul 15 2002, 6 Av 5762
      nyh@... |-----------------------------------------
      Phone: +972-53-245868, ICQ 13349191 |Entropy: Not just a fad, it's the future!
      http://nadav.harel.org.il |

      =================================================================
      To unsubscribe, send mail to linux-il-request@... with
      the word "unsubscribe" in the message body, e.g., run the command
      echo unsubscribe | mail linux-il-request@...

      ----- End forwarded message -----

      --
      Nadav Har'El | Monday, Jul 15 2002, 6 Av 5762
      nyh@... |-----------------------------------------
      Phone: +972-53-245868, ICQ 13349191 |You may only be one person to the world,
      http://nadav.harel.org.il |but may also be the world to one person.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.