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Re: [pfaf] peace garden

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  • ewt
    Lavendar.
    Message 1 of 13 , Nov 19, 2005
      Lavendar.

      On 19/11/05, cutoutcows <cutoutcows@...> wrote:
      > Hello,
      > I am designing a peace garden bed for a community garden on a warm,
      > sunny, temperate site.
      >
      > I was wondering if anyone would like to share any plants that conjure
      > up thoughts/feelings of peace for them, by association, experience,
      > fragrance, visually, anything would really be appreaciated.
      >
      > I like the idea of people eating the 'produce of peace' too, so far I
      > have olives, and rosemary for rememberance...
      >
      > peace
      > ana
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
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      >
    • Griselda
      What a wonderful idea. I personally love the sweet fragrant herbs, marjoram, basil, thyme, the mints. For me, they are associated with the peaceful industry of
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 19, 2005
        Re: [pfaf] peace garden What a wonderful idea. I personally love the sweet fragrant herbs, marjoram, basil, thyme, the mints. For me, they are associated with the peaceful industry of bees, children playing peacefully in a warm quiet garden, and cooking done with patience and love.
        I remember as a child hiding in the black-currant bushes during the summer, and the flowering currants in the spring. I loved the sweet small of lemon balm, so distinct and fragrant.
        I loved hollyhocks too, for their open honest spires of subtle colours, and the wonderful smell of old-time marigolds.
        There is something about the timelessness of a garden for young children. In fact my family life was rather distraught, but through a miracle of chance we children had access to one or two old-fashioned gardens where these things grew, and we spent quiet happy hours there, playing, chatting, being. We had no desires, no ambitions, no arguments. We just ‘were’ among these old-fashioned plants.
        I realise, reading this, how important the smells were...we had no-one to teach us about the plants, as none of the grown-ups really knew or cared, but we could experience these wonderful smells for ourselves. Each one was so distinct and memorable. All we had to do was take a leaf, and crush it gently in our little fingers.
        I find I am re-living my memories because of your request. Thank you.
        Griselda

        Hello,
        I am designing a peace garden bed for a community garden on a warm,
        sunny, temperate site.  

        I was wondering if anyone would like to share any plants that conjure
        up thoughts/feelings of peace for them, by association, experience,
        fragrance, visually, anything would really be appreaciated.

        I like the idea of people eating the 'produce of peace' too, so far I
        have olives, and rosemary for rememberance...

        peace
        ana





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      • icculus2000
        Hi Ana, (I m Steve) Certainly medicinal herbs bring peace to mind for me.. Specifically, Holy Basil (Ocimum sanctum) is planted not only for all the medicinal
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 21, 2005
          Hi Ana,

          (I'm Steve)

          Certainly medicinal herbs bring peace to mind for me..

          Specifically, Holy Basil (Ocimum sanctum) is planted not only for
          all the medicinal and culinary properties that basils possess, but
          also the scent of this basil is really wonderful - fresh and vibrant.

          May your garden thrive,

          Namaste,

          Steve.

          "cutoutcows" <cutoutcows@y...> wrote:
          Hello,
          I am designing a peace garden ...
        • Kristina Patmore
          Hi, I recently read that in symbolic painting, probably of the renaissance, Columbine (Aquilegia sp.) was used to represent certain aspects of peace because
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 22, 2005
            Hi,

            I recently read that in symbolic painting, probably of the
            renaissance, Columbine (Aquilegia sp.) was used to represent certain
            aspects of peace because the flower resembles a dove in some way (I
            struggle to see it unless it should be several doves). Aquilegia
            vulgaris 'Nivea' is a nice pure white one and 'Columba' means dove
            in Greek I think. White heather is also supposed to be very lucky
            although the list of lucky plants is endless. Basil as suggested is
            a very good one since it has been a symbol of love across Europe for
            over 2000 years. Poplar (Populus tremula)is a tree that I would
            personally recommend since the sound of its continuously rustling
            leaves is very soothing, however, if you are superstitious it is
            best avoided since its catkins are sometimes considered a bad omen
            and referred to as 'Devils Fingers'.

            I'm currently working on a bed of plants associated with
            superstition & symbolism. If I come across anything interesting
            I'll forward it.

            For my part, if anyone can suggest plants which have significance in
            Wales in terms of their meanings etc I would love to know. I'm
            trying to compile plants with significance to local people who dont
            often get their beliefs and knowledge into books so if theres anyone
            Welsh out there or with Welsh connections who can tell a story or
            two about the cultural significance of plants, I would love to hear
            from you.

            Also, I'm working on a bed called 'Signatures & Sympathies', this
            will hopefully be an interactive display of plants used in medicine
            according to their visible signatures or by sympathetic/imitative
            magic. Strangely, I've hit a nearly complete blank where signature
            plants are concerned and would love to hear suggestions. It seems
            that most internet sources dwell on the same four examples from the
            Doctrine of Signatures but I need far more than that. I would
            prefer plants which display their signatures as they are grown eg
            Lungworts blotches look like lung disease; the tiny translucent
            holes in Hypericum (st johns wort) leaves make it useful for stab
            wounds etc. Plants which are used according to their roots are not
            so useful because the roots cant be seen but still interesting to
            hear about.

            I look forward to any suggestions

            Thank you very much


            Blue Skies

            Kris


            > "cutoutcows" <cutoutcows@y...> wrote:
            > Hello,
            > I am designing a peace garden ...
            >
          • Griselda
            Hallo again, You might also like to look at Plant Spirit Medicine: The Healing Power of Plants, by Eliot Cowan. It is for sale on Amazon.com You might find a
            Message 5 of 13 , Nov 22, 2005
              Re: [pfaf] Re: peace garden Hallo again,
              You might also like to look at Plant Spirit Medicine: The Healing Power of Plants, by Eliot Cowan. It is for sale on Amazon.com
              You might find a second hand copy somewhere. It is quite interesting in this area.
              Griselda

              Hi,

              I recently read that in symbolic painting, probably of the
              renaissance, Columbine (Aquilegia sp.) was used to represent certain
              aspects of peace because the flower resembles a dove in some way (I
              struggle to see it unless it should be several doves). Aquilegia
              vulgaris 'Nivea' is a nice pure white one and 'Columba' means dove
              in Greek I think.  White heather is also supposed to be very lucky
              although the list of lucky plants is endless.  Basil as suggested is
              a very good one since it has been a symbol of love across Europe for
              over 2000 years. Poplar (Populus tremula)is a tree that I would
              personally recommend since the sound of its continuously rustling
              leaves is very soothing, however, if you are superstitious it is
              best avoided since its catkins are sometimes considered a bad omen
              and referred to as 'Devils Fingers'.

              I'm currently working on a bed of plants associated with
              superstition & symbolism.  If I come across anything interesting
              I'll forward it.  

              For my part, if anyone can suggest plants which have significance in
              Wales in terms of their meanings etc I would love to know. I'm
              trying to compile plants with significance to local people who dont
              often get their beliefs and knowledge into books so if theres anyone
              Welsh out there or with Welsh connections who can tell a story or
              two about the cultural significance of plants, I would love to hear
              from you.

              Also, I'm working on a bed called 'Signatures & Sympathies', this
              will hopefully be an interactive display of plants used in medicine
              according to their visible signatures or by sympathetic/imitative
              magic.  Strangely, I've hit a nearly complete blank where signature
              plants are concerned and would love to hear suggestions.  It seems
              that most internet sources dwell on the same four examples from the
              Doctrine of Signatures but I need far more than that.  I would
              prefer plants which display their signatures as they are grown eg
              Lungworts blotches look like lung disease; the tiny translucent
              holes in Hypericum (st johns wort) leaves make it useful for stab
              wounds etc.  Plants which are used according to their roots are not
              so useful because the roots cant be seen but still interesting to
              hear about.

              I look forward to any suggestions

              Thank you very much


              Blue Skies

              Kris


              > "cutoutcows" <cutoutcows@y...> wrote:
              >  Hello,
              >  I am designing a peace garden ...
              >






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            • Geir Flatabø
              ... Was this also ment from Wales only ?, or anywhere, -- nearly every plant have some signature - lore put to it, Primula veris , st Johns keys, Alchemilla
              Message 6 of 13 , Nov 22, 2005
                >Also, I'm working on a bed called 'Signatures & Sympathies', this
                >will hopefully be an interactive display of plants used in medicine
                >according to their visible signatures or by sympathetic/imitative
                >magic. Strangely, I've hit a nearly complete blank where signature
                >plants are concerned and would love to hear suggestions. It seems
                >that most internet sources dwell on the same four examples from the
                >Doctrine of Signatures but I need far more than that. I would
                >prefer plants which display their signatures as they are grown eg
                >Lungworts blotches look like lung disease; the tiny translucent
                >holes in Hypericum (st johns wort) leaves make it useful for stab
                >wounds etc. Plants which are used according to their roots are not
                >so useful because the roots cant be seen but still interesting to
                >hear about.
                >Blue Skies
                >Kris
                >
                >
                >
                Was this also ment from Wales only ?,
                or anywhere,
                -- nearly every plant have some signature - lore put to it,
                Primula veris , st Johns keys,
                Alchemilla vulgaris coll, lady Marys - rain mantle,
                Juniperus communis, the holy crucifix at top of berries,
                Allium sativum, Garlic - the smell of the devil.

                by the way *did you know Garlic really is named after me - personally* !
                My name is Geir
                The name garlic comes from old old norse Geirr Lauk (Geirr-leek) -
                lauk / leek an onion.
                meaning Geirr is the sharp point of a lance or an arrow, like the
                garlic looks as it comes up from earth and streching,
                and the sharp biting taste and smell....

                Geir Flatabø
              • martin
                Hi have you considered putting a flower clock in , certain flowers open at certain times of the day, you could explain it anyway you like,i did have a copy of
                Message 7 of 13 , Nov 22, 2005
                  Hi
                  have you considered putting a flower clock in , certain flowers open at
                  certain times of the day, you could explain it anyway you like,i did
                  have a copy of plant's that open on the hour but it doesn't want to be
                  found
                  martin
                • nieema
                  Greetings All Martin thank you for looking. Can you please tell the book that I personally would love it to be found. I am liking the idea of a clock in my
                  Message 8 of 13 , Nov 22, 2005
                    Greetings All

                    Martin thank you for looking. Can you please tell the
                    book that I personally would love it to be found. I
                    am liking the idea of a clock in my garden.

                    I just love this group!!!

                    yours in good health

                    nieema
                    --- martin <martinwnaylor@...> wrote:

                    > Hi
                    > have you considered putting a flower clock in ,
                    > certain flowers open at
                    > certain times of the day, you could explain it
                    > anyway you like,i did
                    > have a copy of plant's that open on the hour but it
                    > doesn't want to be
                    > found
                    > martin

                    PPD Push the Positive Daily!
                    I hope this message finds you and yours in the
                    best of Health and Spirit.

                    Our Health is Our Responsibility
                    http://a-healing-village.com
                    Have a look, see some of the new information.

                    nieema
                  • Dee Harris
                    Martin, That is a great idea but how about adding a sun dial with those flowers? I, myself, would add a small weeping willow with the branches being trained to
                    Message 9 of 13 , Nov 22, 2005
                      Martin,
                      That is a great idea but how about adding a sun dial with those flowers? I, myself, would add a small weeping willow with the branches being trained to form a leafy cave for solitude when needed. That I would put in one corner with holly bushes framing each side.
                      Wolf

                      martin <martinwnaylor@...> wrote:
                      Hi
                      have you considered putting a flower clock in , certain flowers open at
                      certain times of the day, you could explain it anyway you like,i did
                      have a copy of plant's that open on the hour but it doesn't want to be
                      found
                      martin






                       


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                    • Dee Harris
                      Chamomile, especially German chamomile, has a beautiful and peaceful looking flower that is it s signature for what it does. If you plan to plant any mints, I
                      Message 10 of 13 , Nov 22, 2005
                        Chamomile, especially German chamomile, has a beautiful and peaceful looking flower that is it's signature for what it does. If you plan to plant any mints, I would suggest that you plant them in a pot first before putting them in the ground. They'll take over if you aren't careful and that's why the pot in the ground. It helps to keep them in check.
                        Wolf

                        Geir Flatabø <geirf@...> wrote:

                        >Also, I'm working on a bed called 'Signatures & Sympathies', this
                        >will hopefully be an interactive display of plants used in medicine
                        >according to their visible signatures or by sympathetic/imitative
                        >magic.  Strangely, I've hit a nearly complete blank where signature
                        >plants are concerned and would love to hear suggestions.  It seems
                        >that most internet sources dwell on the same four examples from the
                        >Doctrine of Signatures but I need far more than that.  I would
                        >prefer plants which display their signatures as they are grown eg
                        >Lungworts blotches look like lung disease; the tiny translucent
                        >holes in Hypericum (st johns wort) leaves make it useful for stab
                        >wounds etc.  Plants which are used according to their roots are not
                        >so useful because the roots cant be seen but still interesting to
                        >hear about.
                        >Blue Skies
                        >Kris
                        >

                        >
                        Was this also ment from Wales only ?,
                        or anywhere,
                        -- nearly every plant have some signature  - lore put to it,
                        Primula veris , st Johns keys,
                        Alchemilla vulgaris coll,  lady Marys - rain mantle,
                        Juniperus communis,  the holy crucifix at top of berries,
                        Allium sativum,  Garlic - the smell of the devil.

                        by the way  *did you know Garlic really is named after me - personally* !
                        My name is Geir
                        The name garlic comes from old old norse  Geirr Lauk (Geirr-leek)  -
                        lauk / leek an onion.
                        meaning Geirr is the sharp point of a lance or an arrow,  like the
                        garlic looks as it comes up from earth and streching,
                        and the sharp biting taste and smell....

                        Geir Flatabø





                         


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                      • cutoutcows
                        Hello and thank you! for your helpful ideas and suggestions for the `peace garden , many of them were included in the design and I would have included them all
                        Message 11 of 13 , Nov 29, 2005
                          Hello and thank you! for your helpful ideas and suggestions for
                          the `peace garden', many of them were included in the design and I
                          would have included them all had there not been limited room (so
                          many plants so little room, a common complaint of mine).

                          Over the last few days I have been lost in an inspired haze of
                          planning, drawing, and thinking about these and many other plants.

                          The peace bed was part of a permaculture design plan which was a
                          component in my course, today was our last day and we show cased the
                          plans to the community group. They were delighted with all the
                          designs (4 in total) and may or may not use mine.

                          The community where the garden is situated is in an area with a lot
                          of youth suicide problems and the facilitator said several
                          young 'troubled' women have been coming in and gardening which has
                          been helping improve their self esteem, and providing them with a
                          safe space. I could really see these women benefiting from some
                          quiet time in the sweetly fragranced peace garden sanctuary you have
                          helped design so I really hope it comes to fruition.

                          In my recent pacifist explorations I have also joined 'food not
                          bombs' and I hope to distribute any spare seedlings I have around so
                          that people can grow their own food for peace:-)

                          If we don't plant the seeds of peace how will it grow?
                          Thanks again for watering me.

                          love and peace
                          ana
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