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Re: [pfaf] Re: hi! how about extracting oils from sumac?

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  • Geir Flatabø
    Nice ! Do you know anything about if the berries have to be seeded !? Here there is only growing a few planted bushes, pure female clones, any knowledge
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 4, 2005
      Nice !
      Do you know anything about if the "berries" have to be "seeded" !?
      Here there is only growing a few planted bushes, pure female clones,
      any knowledge if tehy are as good as pollinated "stags" - berries ??

      Geir Flatabø

      deb skrev:

      >Simple as pie! Simpler!! <G>
      >
      >Take cool to lukewarm water and the cones of staghorn (typhina) or smooth (glabra)
      >sumac. I use Staghorn, since that is what is most prevalent here in SC Iowa. Set the
      >sumac berries the water for a few minutes, then swish them for a minute or so more.
      >Keep doing this with fresh cones until the water is a lovely pink-red color. When I am
      >preserving for winter use, I make it quite strong; not stopping until I have a deep color
      >and the juice is quite strong. This I freeze in ice cube trays, then place the cubes in
      >ziploc bags for long-term storage. I can then take a cube or two out, place in warm
      >water to a medium pink color, and use for tea flavoring, for dipping apples and other
      >fruets in, whatever.
      >
      >
      >
    • deb
      I usually strain through a couple of layers of good cheesecloth, but the rodents got to my stash, and I didn t notice until I pulled it out for use. Didn t
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 4, 2005
        I usually strain through a couple of layers of good cheesecloth, but the rodents got to
        my stash, and I didn't notice until I pulled it out for use. Didn't have time to go to
        town, so grabbed a coffee filter. Worked great. I strain all juices and such, mostly out
        of habit, though. I, too, had heard it was necessary to strain any hair out, but aside
        from the ickypoo factor of drinking "hairy lemonade", don't know why.

        The berries only get drier, especially if you have been having a dry spell as we have.
        no worries about mold or spoilage, especially. It might require more bulk to get
        results. Myself, if I were to get to them too late and find very dry, I wuld just seed
        them and use them for the dressings and "pulp" utilization, and give planting the
        seeds out a try. After all, Mom Nature has already done the drying for you, you're a
        step ahead. {;) However, remember that any dried fruit, from Juniper to raisin to date,
        will reconstitute right up if soaked in water, and since that is what you are doing
        when making the sumacade, I don't see why not. Heck, give 'er a shot with a small
        batch, and please let us know how it turns out!

        Matter of fact, am going out to get some Butterfly Milkweed this weekend, and in
        "spotting" the plants I had marked earlier for propagation, found a whole new stand
        of sumac, both adult and young plants, and plenty of 'em. Will be gathering the older,
        drier seed, and will go ahead and give the "dry sumacade" a try myself. Plus, will be
        able to gather some more good stems for crafts- Love The Fall!!

        Can sure understand making the candle anyway- sometimes, one just *has* to give a
        thing the old college try! <G> deb



        --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "loveragehop" <runningwithsteff@h...> wrote:
        >
        > hey deb, thanks alot for all the info!
        >
        > im still going to give making the candle a shot but at least now i
        > know what im getting into.
        >
        > i also read your posts about its edible uses and really want to try. i
        > also heard somewhere that you gotta strain the hairs from the
        > lemonade. is that true? and is it too late in the year for using
        > them? how do you know if the berries are still ok. (they always seem
        > the same just dryer) i live in MAss, near ALOT of sumac so yeah... it
        > should be sweet
        >
        > aright thanks again
        > lnr
        >
      • deb
        I m a bit confused by your question of clone v. pollinated . Are you speaking of plants propagated by cutting, rootings, or such? As in not from seed ?
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 4, 2005
          I'm a bit confused by your question of "clone v. pollinated". Are you speaking of plants
          propagated by cutting, rootings, or such? As in "not from seed"? Those are my usual
          ways of propagating sumac, which is, essentially, cloning. The cutting will be the same
          gender as the parent plant. Not a problem! The berries, no matter the genesis of the
          plant- are produced via pollination. Not a wit of difference in the berries unless the
          parent plants or the current plants have another issue not related- such as being in less
          than optimum climate, being of whimpy constitution, or such. No worries. <G>

          You don't have to do a thing but rinse off in a bit of cool or cold water if you are making
          sumacade, just to get the dust off. I never harvest edibles within 100 yards of any roads,
          RR tracks, or other such things, to avoid exhaust and other yukoid toxins. I also like to
          go deep into the prairie, on the far side of hedgerows or woods, or stick on the south
          side of roads, no matter how far away, since during growing season here the prevalent
          winds are from the south.

          If you suspect pesticide or other icky chemicals being used in proximity to your harvest,
          you can soak in a solution of one teaspoon bleach to a gallon of water for about 10
          minutes, rinse, then use. Alternately, a peroxide solution or some sal suds. However,
          since you want all the soaking to be for production of good usable solution, I'd opt for
          simply getting the stuff from a "clean" area in the first place.

          If you are using the berries for the pulp, then yes, you want to seed them. Simply
          rubbing them in a strainer will do the trick. For me, it's easier done when the berries are
          already dried, as opposed to full moisture content. HTH! deb

          --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Geir Flatabø <geirf@u...> wrote:
          >
          > Nice !
          > Do you know anything about if the "berries" have to be "seeded" !?
          > Here there is only growing a few planted bushes, pure female clones,
          > any knowledge if tehy are as good as pollinated "stags" - berries ??
          >
          > Geir Flatabø
          >
          > deb skrev:
          >
          > >Simple as pie! Simpler!! <G>
          > >
          > >Take cool to lukewarm water and the cones of staghorn (typhina) or smooth (glabra)
          > >sumac. I use Staghorn, since that is what is most prevalent here in SC Iowa. Set the
          > >sumac berries the water for a few minutes, then swish them for a minute or so
          more.
          > >Keep doing this with fresh cones until the water is a lovely pink-red color. When I am
          > >preserving for winter use, I make it quite strong; not stopping until I have a deep
          color
          > >and the juice is quite strong. This I freeze in ice cube trays, then place the cubes in
          > >ziploc bags for long-term storage. I can then take a cube or two out, place in warm
          > >water to a medium pink color, and use for tea flavoring, for dipping apples and other
          > >fruets in, whatever.
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • Geir Flatabø
          ... And for what do you use / or get the Butterfly Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca or A. tuberosa) ?? ... And what was the dry sumacade ?? Geir Flatabø
          Message 4 of 10 , Nov 10, 2005
            deb skrev:

            >Matter of fact, am going out to get some Butterfly Milkweed this weekend, and in
            >"spotting" the plants I had marked earlier for propagation,
            >
            And for what do you use / or get the Butterfly Milkweed (Asclepias
            syriaca or A. tuberosa) ??

            > will go ahead and give the "dry sumacade" a try myself. deb
            >
            >
            And what was the "dry sumacade" ??

            Geir Flatabø

            >
            >
          • deb
            I propagate/ wildgarden many plants that are endangered or at risk, Butterfly Milkweed is one of them. I also wildgarden Echincacea, black and blue cohosh,
            Message 5 of 10 , Nov 21, 2005
              I propagate/"wildgarden" many plants that are endangered or at risk,
              Butterfly Milkweed is one of them. I also wildgarden Echincacea, black
              and blue cohosh, ginseng... the "Herb of the Hour" and other plants
              that are being put at risk due to overharvesting, loss ob habitat,
              pollution, etc.

              Although it is used medicinally, it is at risk in this area (south
              central Iowa). There are other plants that fulfill the same medicinal
              niches, that are far more plentiful. For that reason, I only propagate
              to help restore the wild populations, not to harvest for use.

              The "dry sumacade" in is reference to the post about having berries
              that were dry on the bush- and she was questioning whether they could
              be used. Unfortunately, we had poachers to handle, and I ended up
              having my wildcraft/forage time cut quite short while trying to get
              them handled and arrested. deb



              --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Geir Flatabø <geirf@u...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > deb skrev:
              >
              > >Matter of fact, am going out to get some Butterfly Milkweed this
              weekend, and in
              > >"spotting" the plants I had marked earlier for propagation,
              > >
              > And for what do you use / or get the Butterfly Milkweed (Asclepias
              > syriaca or A. tuberosa) ??
              >
              > > will go ahead and give the "dry sumacade" a try myself. deb
              > >
              > >
              > And what was the "dry sumacade" ??
              >
              > Geir Flatabø
              >
              > >
              > >
              >
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