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Re: sourcing plants

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  • Colleen & Geoff Keena
    Dear Everyone Hello from Queensland, Australia, where we are currently experiencing the worst drought since 1899 and stringent water restriction. When I
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 3, 2005
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      Dear Everyone

      Hello from Queensland, Australia, where we are currently experiencing the
      worst drought since 1899 and stringent water restriction.

      When I visited England in 1995, a friend asked me to contact B & T World
      Seeds to get seeds for him. At that time B & T was in England but they are
      now in France. I have purchased seeds a number of times since then and
      always found them extremely helpful. I have just checked the website for
      Juglans cinerea
      http://www.b-and-t-world-seeds.com/b&t30.asp
      and Cascara sagrada.
      http://www.b-and-t-world-seeds.com/comcach.htm

      We grow mainly Australian native plants, particularly edible species. When
      we purchased in the Brisbane Valley in 2005, we turned our acre of lawn into
      gardens, with an emphasis on food-producing plants. However, we would be
      very hungry if we didn't include introduced plants such as sweet potatoes.
      We try to garden with local species as much as possible to provide fauna
      habitat but do include plants from elsewhere, both 'native' and 'exotic',
      especially if they are edible species.We don't knowingly include plants that
      could be carried by birds/wind etc and become invasive but there is always a
      risk with any plant grown out of its original habitat.

      Invasive plants are a vexed question as we have environmental weeds here
      that are Australian plants. When these plants, e.g. some Eucalypts, some
      Acacias, have been grown away from their point of origin, they have gone
      wild. Hence we have to treat with caution any 'native but non-endemic'
      species, as well as needing to take particular care with species from
      overseas, e.g. Hibiscus sabdariffa has naturalised in northern Australia.

      I have many times used the PFAF database as an invaluable source of
      information, e.g.
      http://www.ibiblio.org/pfaf/cgi-bin/arr_html?Hibiscus+sabdariffa&CAN=LATIND
      Thank you to those who have produced such a wonderful reference source.

      I enjoy seeing messages from such different climatic conditions and to
      finding what you can grow.

      Best wishes to all

      Colleen Keena
      South-east Queensland, Australia (sub-tropical climate)
      ================================
      Date: Sun, 02 Oct 2005 09:25:47 -0000
      From: "annestobart" <herbaid@...>
      Subject: Re: sourcing plants

      Hmm! This raises an important issue about the potential problems of
      introducing non- native species in case they run amok. But hang on a
      minute - shouldn't we think about this a bit more ? Some of the
      species I am interested in for medicinal use .....
      (Juglans cinerea) and Cascara sagrada (Rhamnus purshiana)
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