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Re: sourcing plants

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  • annestobart
    Hmm! This raises an important issue about the potential problems of introducing non- native species in case they run amok. But hang on a minute - shouldn t we
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 2, 2005
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      Hmm! This raises an important issue about the potential problems of
      introducing non- native species in case they run amok. But hang on a
      minute - shouldn't we think about this a bit more ? Some of the
      species I am interested in for medicinal use are threatened in their
      native lands - Butternut is being badly hit by a fungus, Rhamnus
      purshiana is heavily wildcrafted. These trees and shrubs are wanted
      for a closely managed situation, not for introduction into the
      wild.They will be grown with other native species reflecting the
      types of medicinal herbs used in actual practice, not theoretical
      suggestions from books. If I can establish how well they grow here
      (South West England) then perhaps they can be maintained for
      sustainable supplies of medicinal barks. This does not solve all
      problems but at least could reduce the demand for species that are
      struggling in US or elsewhere. I would like to see more guidance on
      the introduction of non-native species but in the absence of clear
      advice on individual species am going to find out for myself!

      By the way, thanks for the mention of the RHS Plantfinder - have
      tried this before and found that some species listed are not actually
      available, or that the suppliers focus entirely on larger pots (at a
      price) suitable for gardeners - not ideal for establishing larger
      plantings/ forestry context. Don't know if other people have had the
      same problem but I guess this reflects supply and demand so now am
      also looking more closely at growing from seed for the medicinal wood.
      Cheers all
      Anne
      --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Martin Naylor <martinwnaylor@y...> wrote:
      > i'm having a break for a day, the tigers play in the grand final
      tomorrow sydney 7.00pm australia, and they used to be my team from
      childhood, i'm going to listen to the moody blues, striped rolling
      stones and chill till the ferryman ask for a ticket,
      >
      > be wise when you import foriegn speices, i have heard rumers they
      can turn into weeds,
      > agreed, this world is facing iminent destruction, and the future is
      ours
      > love and freedom are at the begining
      > martin
      >
      > Richard Morris <webmaster@p...> wrote:
      > astobart wrote:
      > > Hi All
      > > Not sure if this is an appropriate query for this list but here
      goes -
      > > my problem is not what to plant but locating a supply source for
      > > particular trees and shrubs. I am planting up several acres of a
      > > medicinal wood this autumn in Devon. The aim is to demonstrate
      potential
      > > use of an ex-conifer plantation and create sustainable supplies
      of
      > > medicinal trees and shrubs for my practice as a medical
      herbalist. The
      > > planting will be predominantly native broadleaves of medicinal
      use with
      > > an overstorey of oak and ash in the long term. However there are
      some
      > > North American trees and shrubs which I would like to include
      such as
      > > Butternut (Juglans cinerea) and Cascara sagrada (Rhamnus
      purshiana) and
      > > I have not been able to find supplies through the PFAF website so
      far
      > > (although many thanks to suppliers who I have contacted and have
      > > responded). Can anyone advise on good contacts in US or elsewhere
      likely
      > > to be able to supply seed or young plants? Would be interested to
      know
      > > if anyone has experience of importing such things - are there
      particular
      > > obstacles/ problems?
      > > Best wishes to all
      > > Anne
      > > Anne Stobart, MNIMH
      > > Consultant Medical Herbalist
      > >
      > Try the RHS plant finder
      > http://www.rhs.org.uk/rhsplantfinder/plantfinder.asp
      > this is the mosr compreshesive list of UK plants suppliers I've
      found.
      >
      > It lists 5 supliers for Juglans cinerea and one for
      > Rhamnus purshiana.
      >
      > Rich
      > --
      > Plants for a Future: 7000 useful plants
      > Web: http://www.pfaf.org/
      > Post: 1 Lerryn View, Lerryn, Lostwithiel, Cornwall, PL22 0QJ
      > Tel: 01208 872 963
      > Email: webweaver@p...
      > PFAF electronic mailing list http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf
      >
      >
      >
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      >
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      >
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      >
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    • Liz Turner
      Hi Anne Have you tried Martin Crawford, Agrofrestry Research Trust in Dartington, south Devon? He has 2 forest gardens here where he is trialling many species
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 3, 2005
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        Hi Anne
        Have you tried Martin Crawford, Agrofrestry Research Trust in Dartington, south Devon? He has 2 forest gardens here where he is trialling many species to see how they do in this climate - so similar work to you & he may beable to supply you with plants also.
        best wishes
        Liz (south Devon)
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, October 02, 2005 10:25 AM
        Subject: [pfaf] Re: sourcing plants

        Hmm! This raises an important issue about the potential problems of
        introducing non- native species in case they run amok. But hang on a
        minute - shouldn't we think about this a bit more ? Some of the
        species I am interested in for medicinal use are threatened in their
        native lands - Butternut is being badly hit by a fungus, Rhamnus
        purshiana is heavily wildcrafted. These trees and shrubs are wanted
        for a closely managed situation, not for introduction into the
        wild.They will be grown with other native species reflecting the
        types of medicinal herbs used in actual practice, not theoretical
        suggestions from books.  If I can establish how well they grow here
        (South West England) then perhaps they can be maintained for
        sustainable supplies of medicinal barks. This does not solve all
        problems but at least could reduce the demand for species that are
        struggling in US or elsewhere. I would like to see more guidance on
        the introduction of non-native species but in the absence of clear
        advice on individual species am going to find out for myself!

        By the way, thanks for the mention of the RHS Plantfinder - have
        tried this before and found that some species listed are not actually
        available, or that the suppliers focus entirely on larger pots (at a
        price) suitable for gardeners - not ideal for establishing larger
        plantings/ forestry context. Don't know if other people have had the
        same problem but I guess this reflects supply and demand so now am
        also looking more closely at growing from seed for the medicinal wood.
        Cheers all
        Anne
        --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Martin Naylor <martinwnaylor@y...> wrote:
        > i'm having a break for a day, the tigers play in the grand final
        tomorrow sydney 7.00pm australia, and they used to be my team from
        childhood, i'm going to listen to  the moody blues, striped rolling
        stones and chill till the ferryman ask for a ticket,

        > be wise when you import foriegn speices, i have heard rumers they
        can turn into weeds,
        > agreed, this world is facing iminent destruction, and the future is
        ours
        > love and freedom are at the begining 
        > martin
        >
        > Richard Morris <webmaster@p...> wrote:
        > astobart wrote:
        > > Hi All
        > > Not sure if this is an appropriate query for this list but here
        goes  -
        > > my problem is not what to plant but locating a supply source for
        > > particular trees and shrubs. I am planting up several acres of a
        > > medicinal wood this autumn in Devon. The aim is to demonstrate
        potential
        > > use of an ex-conifer plantation and create sustainable supplies
        of
        > > medicinal trees and shrubs for my practice as a medical
        herbalist. The
        > > planting will be predominantly native broadleaves of medicinal
        use with
        > > an overstorey of oak and ash in the long term. However there are
        some
        > > North American trees and shrubs which I would like to include
        such as
        > > Butternut (Juglans cinerea) and Cascara sagrada (Rhamnus
        purshiana) and
        > > I have not been able to find supplies through the PFAF website so
        far
        > > (although many thanks to suppliers who I have contacted and have
        > > responded). Can anyone advise on good contacts in US or elsewhere
        likely
        > > to be able to supply seed or young plants? Would be interested to
        know
        > > if anyone has experience of importing such things - are there
        particular
        > > obstacles/ problems?
        > > Best wishes to all
        > > Anne
        > > Anne Stobart, MNIMH
        > > Consultant Medical Herbalist
        > >
        > Try the RHS plant finder
        > http://www.rhs.org.uk/rhsplantfinder/plantfinder.asp
        > this is the mosr compreshesive list of UK plants suppliers I've
        found.
        >
        > It lists 5 supliers for Juglans cinerea and one for
        > Rhamnus purshiana.
        >
        > Rich
        > --
        > Plants for a Future: 7000 useful plants
        > Web:   http://www.pfaf.org/
        > Post:  1 Lerryn View, Lerryn, Lostwithiel, Cornwall, PL22 0QJ
        > Tel:      01208 872 963
        > Email: webweaver@p...
        > PFAF electronic mailing list http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf
        >
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        >
        >
        >     Visit your group "pfaf" on the web.
        >  
        >     To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        >  pfaf-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >  
        >     Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
        Service.
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        >
        >
        >
        >            
        > ---------------------------------
        > Do you Yahoo!?
        >   The New Yahoo! Movies: Check out the Latest Trailers, Premiere
        Photos and full Actor Database.



      • Colleen & Geoff Keena
        Dear Everyone Hello from Queensland, Australia, where we are currently experiencing the worst drought since 1899 and stringent water restriction. When I
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 3, 2005
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          Dear Everyone

          Hello from Queensland, Australia, where we are currently experiencing the
          worst drought since 1899 and stringent water restriction.

          When I visited England in 1995, a friend asked me to contact B & T World
          Seeds to get seeds for him. At that time B & T was in England but they are
          now in France. I have purchased seeds a number of times since then and
          always found them extremely helpful. I have just checked the website for
          Juglans cinerea
          http://www.b-and-t-world-seeds.com/b&t30.asp
          and Cascara sagrada.
          http://www.b-and-t-world-seeds.com/comcach.htm

          We grow mainly Australian native plants, particularly edible species. When
          we purchased in the Brisbane Valley in 2005, we turned our acre of lawn into
          gardens, with an emphasis on food-producing plants. However, we would be
          very hungry if we didn't include introduced plants such as sweet potatoes.
          We try to garden with local species as much as possible to provide fauna
          habitat but do include plants from elsewhere, both 'native' and 'exotic',
          especially if they are edible species.We don't knowingly include plants that
          could be carried by birds/wind etc and become invasive but there is always a
          risk with any plant grown out of its original habitat.

          Invasive plants are a vexed question as we have environmental weeds here
          that are Australian plants. When these plants, e.g. some Eucalypts, some
          Acacias, have been grown away from their point of origin, they have gone
          wild. Hence we have to treat with caution any 'native but non-endemic'
          species, as well as needing to take particular care with species from
          overseas, e.g. Hibiscus sabdariffa has naturalised in northern Australia.

          I have many times used the PFAF database as an invaluable source of
          information, e.g.
          http://www.ibiblio.org/pfaf/cgi-bin/arr_html?Hibiscus+sabdariffa&CAN=LATIND
          Thank you to those who have produced such a wonderful reference source.

          I enjoy seeing messages from such different climatic conditions and to
          finding what you can grow.

          Best wishes to all

          Colleen Keena
          South-east Queensland, Australia (sub-tropical climate)
          ================================
          Date: Sun, 02 Oct 2005 09:25:47 -0000
          From: "annestobart" <herbaid@...>
          Subject: Re: sourcing plants

          Hmm! This raises an important issue about the potential problems of
          introducing non- native species in case they run amok. But hang on a
          minute - shouldn't we think about this a bit more ? Some of the
          species I am interested in for medicinal use .....
          (Juglans cinerea) and Cascara sagrada (Rhamnus purshiana)
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