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Re: [pfaf] Re: Need Advice for Laurentians (Rocky, Acidic Soil), Short Growing Season

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  • Bob Ewing
    Greetings for jack pine: http://ianrpubs.unl.edu/forestry/g380.htm and from pfaf database: beaked hazel Propagation Seed - best sown as soon as it is harvested
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 25, 2005
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      Greetings for jack pine:

      http://ianrpubs.unl.edu/forestry/g380.htm

      and from pfaf database:

      beaked hazel

      Propagation
      Seed - best sown as soon as it is harvested in autumn
      in a cold frame[164]. Germinates in late winter or
      spring. Stored seed should be pre-soaked in warm water
      for 48 hours and then given 2 weeks warm followed by 3
      - 4 months cold stratification[164]. Germinates in 1 -
      6 months at 20°c[164]. When large enough to handle,
      prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow
      them on in a cold frame or sheltered place outdoors
      for their first winter. Plant them out into their
      permanent positions in late spring or early summer[K].

      --- George Mogiljansky <mogiljan@...> wrote:


      ---------------------------------

      Thank you, Bob. I'm just discovering permaculture
      (incl. environmental horticulture).

      I planted three chestnut seedlings in April but they
      didn't take. I'm told the soil was too cold. I also
      didn't harden them enough, I suspect.

      April is early , at least here, we plant usually, late
      May or early June.



      I will look for a local source of seedlings for beaked
      hazel and jack pine, unless they can be started from
      seed?

      George


      --- Bob Ewing <urbanpermaculture@...> wrote:

      > Greetings, i live in Thunder Bay, Ontario on the
      > edge
      > of the Boreal Forest, growing conditions appear to
      > be
      > similar to yours. We have grown, jack pine,
      > blueberries and beaked hazel (C. cornuta) in close
      > proximity and all do well. The jack pine provides
      > the
      > acidic soil that blueberries love.
      >
      > The beaked hazel thrives here and provides edible
      > nuts.
      >
      > Bob Ewing
      >
      > Permaculture is how we take control over our own
      > lives, meet our individual needs and build our
      > common future. Let Nature be your mentor.
      > www.restoretheearth.ca





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    • Geir Flatabø
      ... Obviously if ther is beech growing, at least three nut trees will make it: Pinus cembra, Pinus koraiensis, Pinus sibirica, Probably also Corylus avellana ,
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 26, 2005
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        mogiljan skrev:

        >I'm looking for something along the lines of permaculture; in the hope
        >of planting either nut trees (perhaps with artificial shelter to
        >extend the growing season and protect the roots against deep freeze)
        >or use raised beds for gardening (again, a hoop/green-house may be
        >needed).
        >Compost - very necessary, but there's not a lot of excess soil to
        >start with.
        >
        >George (Canada)
        >
        >
        Obviously if ther is beech growing,
        at least three nut trees will make it:
        Pinus cembra, Pinus koraiensis, Pinus sibirica,
        Probably also Corylus avellana , C. colurna, and C. maxima and hybrids,

        if you were situated in Norway (I am) -
        if beech is growing, I would also try Juglans regia, Juglans nigra,
        Castanea dentata,
        here they thrive with approx 120 - 150 days growing season.

        Geir Flatabø
      • George Mogiljansky
        Thanks, Geir. Unless I m mistaken, you are near the Gulf Stream and the warming effect? What about further inland? What is growing there? George ...
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 28, 2005
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          Thanks, Geir.

          Unless I'm mistaken, you are near the Gulf Stream and
          the warming effect?

          What about further inland? What is growing there?

          George


          --- Geir Flatabø <geirf@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          > mogiljan skrev:
          >
          > >I'm looking for something along the lines of
          > permaculture; in the hope
          > >of planting either nut trees (perhaps with
          > artificial shelter to
          > >extend the growing season and protect the roots
          > against deep freeze)
          > >or use raised beds for gardening (again, a
          > hoop/green-house may be
          > >needed).
          > >Compost - very necessary, but there's not a lot of
          > excess soil to
          > >start with.
          > >
          > >George (Canada)
          > >
          > >
          > Obviously if ther is beech growing,
          > at least three nut trees will make it:
          > Pinus cembra, Pinus koraiensis, Pinus sibirica,
          > Probably also Corylus avellana , C. colurna, and C.
          > maxima and hybrids,
          >
          > if you were situated in Norway (I am) -
          > if beech is growing, I would also try Juglans
          > regia, Juglans nigra,
          > Castanea dentata,
          > here they thrive with approx 120 - 150 days growing
          > season.
          >
          > Geir Flatabø
          >


          http://www.geocities.com/mogiljan/SustainableFuture.html
          Check out Dr. Williams' Proposal for a Solar Tower
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        • Geir Flatabø
          You are right, the gulf effect makes warmer / milder and more rainy winthers , and cooler summers. Summer temperatures seldom above 25 C, and nearly never
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 28, 2005
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            You are right,
            the gulf effect makes warmer / milder and more rainy winthers , and
            "cooler" summers. Summer temperatures seldom above 25 C, and nearly
            never above 30C, till now this year we have had extremely bad weathers,
            with only two days of temperatures abowe 20C. Winter temperatures might
            go down to -20C, and stay with -10C for a week or more....
            Local climatic factors - as south facing slopes are necessary for the
            more warmth demanding species as Chestnuts, grapes and nectarines, but
            the pines and walnuts and hazelnuts do make it "anywhere" how named
            varieties of hazelnuts would do, I cannot say. - but some old filberts
            and cobnuts do OK.
            The pines are hardy to nearly timberline - 1000 m above sea level and
            beyond polar circle. Hazelnuts have no trouble inland, at least the
            wild types, I have also tried almonds and figs, they survive a few
            years, if protected, but I guess it would be possible to get hardier
            varieties.
            .
            Geir Flatabø

            George Mogiljansky skrev:

            >Thanks, Geir.
            >
            >Unless I'm mistaken, you are near the Gulf Stream and
            >the warming effect?
            >
            >What about further inland? What is growing there?
            >
            >George
            >
            >
            >--- Geir Flatabø <geirf@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            >>mogiljan skrev:
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>>I'm looking for something along the lines of
            >>>
            >>>
            >>permaculture; in the hope
            >>
            >>
            >>>of planting either nut trees (perhaps with
            >>>
            >>>
            >>artificial shelter to
            >>
            >>
            >>>extend the growing season and protect the roots
            >>>
            >>>
            >>against deep freeze)
            >>
            >>
            >>>or use raised beds for gardening (again, a
            >>>
            >>>
            >>hoop/green-house may be
            >>
            >>
            >>>needed).
            >>>Compost - very necessary, but there's not a lot of
            >>>
            >>>
            >>excess soil to
            >>
            >>
            >>>start with.
            >>>
            >>>George (Canada)
            >>>
            >>>
            >>>
            >>>
            >>Obviously if ther is beech growing,
            >>at least three nut trees will make it:
            >>Pinus cembra, Pinus koraiensis, Pinus sibirica,
            >>Probably also Corylus avellana , C. colurna, and C.
            >>maxima and hybrids,
            >>
            >>if you were situated in Norway (I am) -
            >>if beech is growing, I would also try Juglans
            >>regia, Juglans nigra,
            >>Castanea dentata,
            >>here they thrive with approx 120 - 150 days growing
            >>season.
            >>
            >>Geir Flatabø
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            >http://www.geocities.com/mogiljan/SustainableFuture.html
            >Check out Dr. Williams' Proposal for a Solar Tower
            >http://f1.pg.briefcase.yahoo.com/mogiljan
            >To obtain three pdf files (600k) -
            >send your Yahoo ID only to download; or I will send via email attachment.
            >
            >
            >
            >____________________________________________________
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