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Re: [pfaf] Any foragers in Ireland (Dublin preferably)?

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  • Martin Naylor
    hi there must be a permaculture group there surly, why not star one up, talk to the old people the women will remember herbs in the area and the men will
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 11, 2005
      hi
      there must be a permaculture group there surly, why not star one up, talk to the old people the women will remember herbs in the area and the men will remember organic ways [they wouldnt be able to buy chemicals, and may be planting and harvesting by the moon,
      martin [from the land down under] 

      David Collins <davidcollins78@...> wrote:

      Hi,
      Being a city dweller, and having very little space to grow my own
      plants, I have become interested lately in the idea of using wild
      plants (for all sorts of uses, but food primarily). There are a number
      of parks, and other less-developed areas, within walking distance for me.
      It would be very helpful if someone experienced in plant
      identification could assist me in my foraging, so if you are
      interested, please let me know! I have no desire to poison myself.
      There is little prospect of me actually being able to meet up anywhere
      far from Dublin city (at least on a regular basis), but feel free to
      get in touch anyway - it might be worth the travel distance for
      reliable information, and good company, of course!
      I am prepared to research myself, using books/internet resources etc.
      (I have found 'Plants for a Future' to be a wonderful resource by the
      way), but don't think that taking a two-pronged approach is any harm.
      My apologies if people feel this message is inappropriate for an
      international group.

      Sincerely
      David





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    • David Collins
      Hi Martin, I ll look into it. Thanks ... talk to the old people the women will remember herbs in the area and the men will remember organic ways [they wouldnt
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 12, 2005
        Hi Martin, I'll look into it. Thanks

        --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Martin Naylor <martinwnaylor@y...> wrote:
        > hi
        > there must be a permaculture group there surly, why not star one up,
        talk to the old people the women will remember herbs in the area and
        the men will remember organic ways [they wouldnt be able to buy
        chemicals, and may be planting and harvesting by the moon,
        > martin [from the land down under]
      • Martin Naylor
        hi try raw fooders, as well on net martin David Collins wrote: Hi Martin, I ll look into it. Thanks ... talk to the old people the
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 12, 2005
          hi
          try raw fooders, as well on net
          martin

          David Collins <davidcollins78@...> wrote:

          Hi Martin, I'll look into it. Thanks

          --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, Martin Naylor <martinwnaylor@y...> wrote:
          > hi
          > there must be a permaculture group there surly, why not star one up,
          talk to the old people the women will remember herbs in the area and
          the men will remember organic ways [they wouldnt be able to buy
          chemicals, and may be planting and harvesting by the moon,
          > martin [from the land down under]






          Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo! Movies.

        • sonnicat
          Hey, I ve just joined this group and found your post. I ve been interested in wild foraging for years - join the club! (I m on the other side of the Irish Sea
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 18, 2005
            Hey, I've just joined this group and found your post. I've been
            interested in wild foraging for years - join the club! (I'm on the
            other side of the Irish Sea in West Wales.)
            Google 'wild foraging' and 'wild food' and you'll get lots of hits.
            If you want to exlude the numerous US sites specify UK search only
            but many of the wild food plants found in America are also found
            here.
            Right now, if you live near the coast, you may be able to find sea
            beet which is possibly my favourite 'greens' of all, including
            cultivated. Alexanders, also a coastal plant, is at its best now,
            before it flowers. Ramsons or wild garlic is putting out shoots in
            the woods. Wild sorrel is easy to find. It goes without saying that
            you shouldn't overpick and not at all if the plants are scarce.
            Good books on wild food by Roger Phillips and by Hugh Fearnley-
            whittingstall.
            Good luck!
          • David Collins
            Hi, Lovely to receive such a nice response. I have also been considering seaweed - because yes, Dublin is right on the coast. I am a bit concerned about the
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 20, 2005
              Hi,
              Lovely to receive such a nice response. I have also been considering
              seaweed - because yes, Dublin is right on the coast. I am a bit
              concerned about the quality of the water however, because, although a
              'state-of-the-art' sewage-treatment plant is treating the sewage of
              approximately a million people on it's way to the sea, and although
              the water which finally enters the sea is allegedly blue-flaggable,
              this treatment-plant-upgrade is relatively recent, and, to the best of
              my knowledge, it wasn't so long ago (within the last few years) that
              raw sewage was being pumped into Dublin Bay.

              So, can anyone offer an opinion as to whether or not the seaweed
              washed up on our shore (Dublin Bay) is safe to eat (after a thorough
              rinsing/washing of course)? I've read that seaweed is highly
              nutritious, and it's crunchy, naturally-salty flavour makes it very
              tasty in my opinion. 'Dublin Bay prawns' (and I suspect other marine
              creatures) are still available in restaurants to the best of my
              knowledge, which suggests to me that this wonderful 'seaweed' might be
              safe to eat after all - at least I hope it is!!

              Any ideas?

              Thanks
              and best regards,
              David


              --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "sonnicat" <nchroustchoff@h...> wrote:
              >
              > Hey, I've just joined this group and found your post. I've been
              > interested in wild foraging for years - join the club! (I'm on the
              > other side of the Irish Sea in West Wales.)
              > Google 'wild foraging' and 'wild food' and you'll get lots of hits.
              > If you want to exlude the numerous US sites specify UK search only
              > but many of the wild food plants found in America are also found
              > here.
              > Right now, if you live near the coast, you may be able to find sea
              > beet which is possibly my favourite 'greens' of all, including
              > cultivated. Alexanders, also a coastal plant, is at its best now,
              > before it flowers. Ramsons or wild garlic is putting out shoots in
              > the woods. Wild sorrel is easy to find. It goes without saying that
              > you shouldn't overpick and not at all if the plants are scarce.
              > Good books on wild food by Roger Phillips and by Hugh Fearnley-
              > whittingstall.
              > Good luck!
            • sonnicat
              Seaweed, yes, lovely stuff, here in Wales we eat it as laverbread . However the danger that you need to be aware of comes not so much from sewage pollution as
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 21, 2005
                Seaweed, yes, lovely stuff, here in Wales we eat it as 'laverbread'.
                However the danger that you need to be aware of comes not so much
                from sewage pollution as from concentration of radioactive isotopes,
                especially since Dublin is not far across the water from that prime
                source of contamination - Sellafield. Have a look on the Web before
                you go for it; here's one hit I found:
                www.nci.org/02/01/23-08.htm
                which warns of high concentrations on the NE coast of Ireland!
              • David Collins
                ... Hi, Yes, someone (offlist) has pointed out the same problem to me since my previous message. It s a shame really - and a disgrace of course! It probably
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 22, 2005
                  --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "sonnicat" <nchroustchoff@h...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Seaweed, yes, lovely stuff, here in Wales we eat it as 'laverbread'.
                  > However the danger that you need to be aware of comes not so much
                  > from sewage pollution as from concentration of radioactive isotopes,
                  > especially since Dublin is not far across the water from that prime
                  > source of contamination - Sellafield. Have a look on the Web before
                  > you go for it; here's one hit I found:
                  > www.nci.org/02/01/23-08.htm
                  > which warns of high concentrations on the NE coast of Ireland!

                  Hi,
                  Yes, someone (offlist) has pointed out the same problem to me since my
                  previous message. It's a shame really - and a disgrace of course! It
                  probably should have occured to me already though. I guess my
                  seaweed-tasting will have to wait until my next visit to the Atlantic
                  coast!
                  Thanks
                  David
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