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Re: planting on public land, especially the Prunus brigantina

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  • Gaardenier
    Dear Dr. Chiranjit Parmar, Since years, I appreciate your initiatives and when searching for info, always consult your Fruitipedia. As you know, apricots are a
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 11, 2013
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      Dear Dr. Chiranjit Parmar,

       

      Since years, I appreciate your initiatives and when searching for info, always consult your Fruitipedia.

      As you know, apricots are a separate case and a lot of discussion has been made about.

      While always digging deeper than most gardeners do, I found that the Briançon Plum, the most distant family member is from the apricot genetics.

      That is why I am so happy to find it. However, it is not at all sure that it will thrive in Flanders/belgium. But I think there is a fair chance.

      With some friends horticulturists/botanists we will give it a trial on my barren railway land en slopes.

      My knowledge of French helped a lot, searching for professional cooperation in France, therefore already this request: Briançon is a famous French town and the spelling of the word is in this case very important, because “-con” in French is a heavy insult and very different pronounced. The Prunus brigantina is only growing naturally in that neighborhood. It would be a good idea thus, to change brioncon in the correct Briançon. Further on, in French it is named Prune (or Prunier) de Briançon, and so although it is rather an apricot, the right translation of the local and original name is Briançon Plum. The correct actual scientific name is Prunus brigantina.

      Surely, I will keep you briefed and think that these two are the best scientific papers for real enthusiasts:

       

      1.    http://www.google.be/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&frm=1&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&ved=0CD8QFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.researchgate.net%2Fpublication%2F225789016_Microsatellite_variability_in_apricots_(Prunus_armeniaca_L.)_reflects_their_geographic_origin_and_breeding_history%2Ffile%2Fd912f503e3cf4af72b.pdf&ei=_Y0HUrLQOeiX0AWlpoCgAw&usg=AFQjCNEKDy00H8-UPQR8WoaXLy3YWPlVzQ&sig2=OypqIZzyog035Vtp2io1WQ&bvm=bv.50500085,d.d2k

       

      quote (look also to their denomination, P. brigantiaca):

       

      Relation between species and cultivar groups:

      The relationship between the different Prunus species and

      P. armeniaca was analysed using Neis genetic distance

      (Fig. 1). P. x dasycarpa, P. brigantiaca and Plumcot were

      distant from the common apricot cluster, P. brigantiaca

      being the most distant species. P. x dasycarpa, an apricot x

      P. cerasifera hybrid, was found intermediate between apricot

      groups and Plumcot, which is a hybrid between apricot

      and P. salicinia. The genetic identity between P. brigantiaca

      and apricot groups was generally low (Table 4), reaching

      0.09% between P. brigantiaca and the Central Asian and

      North American groups.

       

      2.    http://www.tela-botanica.org/bdtfx-nn-53436

       

      vriendelijke groeten, Kind Regards,

       

       

      Leo Aerts, alias Gaardenier

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