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Re: [pfaf] Willow uk

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  • fran k
    HI, No, it just needs cutting every year to eventually make the maze very bushy. It s free.
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 12, 2012
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      HI, No, it just needs cutting every year to eventually make the maze very bushy. It's free.


      ------------------------------
      On Mon, Mar 12, 2012 8:17 PM GMT Paula Harrison wrote:

      >hi if we cut the willow do we have to pay or is it have it in retuyrn for labour sort of thing?
      >
      >
      >
      >________________________________
      > From: frank_bowman <frank_bowman@...>
      >To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      >Sent: Monday, 12 March 2012, 16:13
      >Subject: [pfaf] Willow uk
      >
      >

      >Willowavailable.

      >Large Willow maze at Kinmel Bay, that needs yearly
      >coppicing.

      >Could you please
      >pass on to anyone you think may be interested. For any more info, and photos
      >and more detail of the willow species please message or email me.

      >Biofuel willow.  Basket willow.  Hurdle willow.  Structure willow.  9 varieties listed below..  

      >The average amount
      >one can easily cut in one day is 1000, to 2000, and a lot of these can be
      >divided into 2 or 3 for planting out.  Which, is easy because you literally poke them into the ground about 6 "
      >deep or more if you can.   I average
      >about 250 to 350 planted in an hour.  

      >The people who own
      >the Willow maze
      >appreciate it being cut, which has to be done yearly in order that it becomes
      >very bushy.   

      >Each whip normally
      >costs around  £1ea to buy. 

      >Its at the Chester Avenue,
      >community woodland, in Kinmel Bay, next to Rhyl.

      >The address is Chester Avenue, Kinmel Bay,
      >which is a road to the left, as you come down the St Asaph Rd, to the beach.

      >Communities first
      >established the gardens originally, and their tel number is 01745361140.  
      >They'll tell you its not their responsibility any more and that you will have
      >to contact the clerk of the council, Dave Courns, and his number is
      >01745355899.   Usually he'll be happy to tell you to go and coppice what
      >you like. There's 9 good varieties to choose from..    But, if
      >your getting a lot then it'd be best just to check with Dave first.

      >The Link for
      >directions on a map is below:.

      >http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?hl=en&safe=active&q=chester+avenue,+kinmel+bay&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Rhodfa+Caer,+Kinmel+Bay,+Rhyl,+Clwyd+LL18+5LA,+United+Kingdom&gl=uk&ei=44yWS7G0GYe80gS1vejwCw&ved=0CAgQ8gEwAA&z=16

      >The willow can be coppiced
      >up until April, but the earlier the better.  
      >For the work,  I would suggest a good pair of gloves and
      >perhaps knee pads, or a kneeling mat. You cut the willow right at the base, you
      >can use secateurs no problem, but some stems can be thick so a little pair of
      >hand held loppers, ie the next cutters up from secateurs are best. Also
      >bring string to tie up the bundles.   The varieties that are planted there
      >are the varieties in the pdf document.
      >Its fairly easy to cut more
      >than 1000 in a day, and at a normal cost of £1 each that's pretty good. I've
      >found that a normal planting rate is about 250 an hour. For planting you stick
      >the branches in the ground as deep as you can.
      >I've found that its much
      >better to plant them as short sticks at about 2' above ground if planting in
      >grass, (1' , or as deep as you can underneath ground.) I've planted them as 6 –
      >8' lengths, but when they're that big its much harder for the energy in the
      >willow to focus on growing roots and establishing themselves.


      >List and
      >descriptions of the Willow
      >that was originally planted:

      >VIMINALIS Osier
      >SUPER WILLOW 
      >Very vigorous,
      >producing long straight rods up to 3m+ (1O'+) a year. Traditionally used to
      >make sturdy, practical baskets for fishing and agricultural use. Two year old
      >material is often used for hurdle uprights, furniture, etc. Other uses include
      >living structures, windbreaks, soil stabilisation, waste filtration, fuel
      >production, and artist charcoal. Long leaves and catkins.

      >DASYCLADOS
      >"SUPER WILLOW" 
      >Very vigorous
      >hybrid willow. Slightly shorter but thicker than viminalis. Suitable for windbreaks,
      >soil stabilisation, waste filtration, and fuel production. Broad leaves

      >CHINESE
      >"SUPER WILLOW"
      >Very vigorous
      >producing long rods up to 3m+ (10'+). Shiny green stems turning orangey shades
      >towards tips. Suitable for living structures, soil stabilisation, waste
      >filtration, fuel production, ornamental use. Attractive long, narrow leaves and
      >abundant catkins

      >Q83 "SUPER
      >WILLOW" (hybrid of viminalis and triandra)   The vigour of viminalis and weaving
      >qualities of triandra. Attractive medium brown stems. Triandra-like leaves and
      >catkins. Favoured by hurdle makers, and suitable for other willow crafts
      >including large basketry and living structures. Also useful for soil
      >stabilisation, waste filtration and ornamental use. Not suitable for extreme
      >environments.

      >TRIANDRA
      >Almond-leafed Willow 
      >Traditional basket
      >willow still grown commercially today in Somerset
      >levels. Brown bark. Useful for dried willow crafts and living willow structures
      >and ornamental use. Glossy serrated leaves, catkins. Does not like extreme
      >environments.

      >DAPHNOIDES Violet
      >Willow 
      >Tough, vigorous
      >and decorative, deep violet rods up to 2-3m. Some side shoots. Useful for
      >living structures, windbreaks, waste filtration and colourful stems in winter.
      >Attractive leaves and catkins.

      >PURPUREA 
      >Traditional basket
      >variety producing medium fine rods up to 2m long. Mainly green in colour.
      >Attractive blue/green glaucus leaves. Will make an attractive garden hedge.

      >EUGENII 
      >Probably the
      >tallest growing of the purpureas. Very long straight rods 2-3m. Long narrow
      >blue/green glaucus leaves and abundant catkins. An attractive variety for
      >basketry, crafts, living structures, garden hedges and bee fodder.

      >DARK DICKS 
      >Very fine basket
      >variety. Rods 1-2m long. As the name suggests - dark purple in colour.

      >ALBA -
      >VITELLINA 
      >Rich yellow
      >coloured stems make this a popular variety for landscape work. Can be grown as
      >a shrub or a tree. Suitable for a garden hedge.

      >FLANDERSRED 
      >Hybrid of albe and
      >fragilis. A highly sought after basket variety producing long straight rods
      >that dry to a rich orangey brown. Rods up to 2m+
      >
    • travelerinthyme
      There is a fellow at the Renaissance Faire who makes willow furniture, and the sample chairs he set out in front of his shop took root and grew green leaves,
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 13, 2012
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        There is a fellow at the Renaissance Faire who makes willow furniture, and the sample chairs he set out in front of his shop took root and grew green leaves, how cool is that?

        ~Traveler in Thyme, Blanco, Texas
      • fran k
        Ha ha, that s very cool. And that would be a nice thing to do and get it on you tube. Think ill give that idea to a forester and woodworker I know. I ve just
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 13, 2012
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          Ha ha, that's very cool. And that would be a nice thing to do and get it on you tube.

          Think ill give that idea to a forester and woodworker I know.

          I've just been sitting down scraping some willow bark in the sun for a water tub that I'm going to use to hold a bit of pear rootstock in, just to keep it fresh till I plant it out. Also most people don't know that most apple and pear rootstocks come like willow too.

          paying £2 for a rootstock when a cutting from the year before will work free.

          nice to get more people doing it, and that money can be no bar to it.

          nice to get a response to the post to.

          :) frank


          ------------------------------
          On Tue, Mar 13, 2012 4:37 PM GMT travelerinthyme wrote:

          >There is a fellow at the Renaissance Faire who makes willow furniture, and the sample chairs he set out in front of his shop took root and grew green leaves, how cool is that?
          >
          >~Traveler in Thyme, Blanco, Texas
          >
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