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proper land use

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  • travelerinthyme
    True, Javier, that food production is a political problem. Here in my neighborhood, a rocky ridge in Central Texas, there is a seam of good, deep soil all
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 16, 2012
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      True, Javier, that food production is a political problem. Here in my neighborhood, a rocky ridge in Central Texas, there is a seam of good, deep soil all around the hillsides at about 1600 feet, with nothing but rocks above and below. We are lucky to have a wide enough patch of "black gumbo" to make a big veggie garden and we have many tall oaks, but most of our neighbors have nothing but limestone and juniper scrub.

      Both next door neighbors also have a big patch of real soil, but use the open, flat spaces for parking junk cars and paving over for driveways. I wish there were some way I could talk them into letting me build beautiful gardens in their yards, I'd do it for FREE, but they get suspicious and want their privacy. City people who move to the "country" and don't know how to live like country people are a huge problem in Texas, where the laws favour the land owner, no matter what he does to his land.

      Perhaps we need a licence to prove ability to farm, like a license proving the ability to drive a car, before allowing people to occupy the ever-shrinking areas suitable for cultivation. Really, most people around here don't even know what they have! They all commute to the city and spend their time in the country relaxing instead of working their land, and spread their junk over 5 acres.

      My husband calls me an "Eco-Nazi", and it's true I love my trees more than most of my neighbors! <LOL>

      ~Marcia Cash, Traveler in Thyme
      Blanco County, Texas, zone 8-9
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