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Russian Tomatoes

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  • travelerinthyme
    We had a light freeze with some driving sleet, I forgot to bring in a flat of Russian tomatoes ( Black Krim ) in 4 pots, but they SURVIVED and have actually
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 15, 2012
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      We had a light freeze with some driving sleet, I forgot to bring in a flat of Russian tomatoes ("Black Krim") in 4" pots, but they SURVIVED and have actually put on new growth in the three days since the freeze!

      I had great luck with this variety last year, it made the ugliest brownish purple tomatoes that were incredibly sweet and juicy, starting in early May, and giving up in the heat of June. Then the "Legend" and "Abe Lincoln" heirloom varieties took over and made all thru summer heat, though I estimated it probably took 5 gallons of water PER tomato, it was worth it, ymmmmmmmm......

      Also, the French Dinant celery in 2" seed flats and all the "wild" lettuce in the backyard (Black Seeded Simpson escapees, by the look of them), survived being frozen solid, but revived quickly with a drink of warm seaweed water and are ready to transplant into the garden, ain't Nature amazing? Now, if the cat would stop walking carefully across the seed flats...........

      ~Traveler in Thyme
      Blanco, Texas zone 8-9
    • Geir Flatabø
      You ar eobserving that Black Krim are more cold hardy ( and more warmth sensitive ?) than other tomatoes ?? Geir Flatabø Den 15:16 15. februar 2012 skrev
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 15, 2012
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        You ar eobserving that Black Krim
        are more cold hardy
        ( and more warmth sensitive ?)
        than other tomatoes ??
         
        Geir Flatabø

        Den 15:16 15. februar 2012 skrev travelerinthyme <traveler.in.thyme@...> følgende:
        We had a light freeze with some driving sleet, I forgot to bring in a flat of Russian tomatoes ("Black Krim") in 4" pots, but they SURVIVED and have actually put on new growth in the three days since the freeze!

        I had great luck with this variety last year, it made the ugliest brownish purple tomatoes that were incredibly sweet and juicy, starting in early May, and giving up in the heat of June.    Then the "Legend" and "Abe Lincoln" heirloom varieties took over and made all thru summer heat, though I estimated it probably took 5 gallons of water PER tomato, it was worth it, ymmmmmmmm......

        Also, the French Dinant celery in 2" seed flats and all the "wild" lettuce  in the backyard (Black Seeded Simpson escapees, by the look of them), survived being frozen solid, but revived quickly with a drink of warm  seaweed water and are ready to transplant into the garden, ain't Nature amazing?   Now, if the cat would stop walking carefully across the seed flats...........

        ~Traveler in Thyme
        Blanco, Texas zone 8-9



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      • travelerinthyme
        Black Krim tomatoes, an heirloom variety, are extremely cold tolerant. Our February days are in the 60 s and our nights in the 40-50 range, and the plants in
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 16, 2012
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          Black Krim tomatoes, an heirloom variety, are extremely cold tolerant. Our February days are in the 60's and our nights in the 40-50 range, and the plants in 4" pots are outdoors and growing steadily, to be transplanted into the garden the middle of March. We had a 28 degree freeze for 2 nights last week, and I left the tomatoes out on the covered porch (they did not get sleet on them, but they did freeze), and when I watered them with warm, weak fertilizer solution, they sprang back to life, though they do look a bit raggedy.

          The plants under grow lights are much healthier, but are going outside today, only brought indoors if it really gets cold again. Peppers, basil, and other tender plants will stay under the grow lights for another month, but the Black Krim tomatoes love the cooler weather. They will be finished before the heat of June, I will save seeds and plant another crop indoors in the air conditioning, to set out in September for autumn fruits.

          Here in Central Texas, we have a "second spring" in autumn, when it's much easier to grow brocolli, lettuce, and other cool season crops. It's the summers that are the dead season, hot and dry and brown. Winter usually has butterflies every day!

          ~Marcia Cash, Traveler in Thyme
          Blanco County, TX zone 8-9
        • travelerinthyme
          I bought the original seeds from Nichols Garden Nursery in Oregon, who have many different heirloom veggies and flowers for sale, as well as a very informative
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 18, 2012
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            I bought the original seeds from Nichols Garden Nursery in Oregon, who have many different heirloom veggies and flowers for sale, as well as a very informative online catalog. Their local climate is Northwest Coast, cool and humid, while mine in Texas is mild, wet winter and hot,dry summer, so not everything they offer will survive in my garden. It's much greener here in January than in August, then we have a "second spring" in September, so usually grow two short-season crops and let everything turn brown in summer. Cilantro and lettuce are winter weeds in our yard, but they are always gone before the tomatoes ripen, unlike typical Mediterranean fare. But I put away dozens of quarts of tomato sauce in season, to make quick meals with fresh herbs in winter. Beans 'n' Greens, our staple food.

            Two other tomato varieties that never fail me are Legend and Abe Lincoln. They are both good sliced or sauced. Personally, I'm not fond of raw tomatoes, but will put my salsas and marinaras up against any chef in the world ... it's those fresh marjoram and basil blossom tips that make the prize winning difference!
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