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Re: [pfaf] Free Report "YOU CAN PROFIT BY PRODUCING FOOD PRODUCTS FOR EXPORT"

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  • octavio torres
    Nikki greetings from Northern Colombia. Interesting the document. Can you send to us(or indicate where or how obtain) 100 Kenaf seeds for test its adaptation
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 14, 2012
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      Nikki greetings from Northern Colombia. Interesting the document. Can you send to us(or indicate where or how obtain) 100 Kenaf seeds for test its adaptation in our ecological conditions (warm around the year, very sunny and strog rains in August-November
      Thanks and Regards
       
      OCTAVIO TORRES JIMENEZ, President
      Northern Colombia Agronomist Engineers Association, ASIADELA
      Calle 85A No. 75A - 33
      BARRANQUILLA COLOMBIA SOUTH AMERICA

      De: Nikki <sagwtrees@...>
      Para: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      Enviado: Martes 14 de febrero de 2012 0:57
      Asunto: [pfaf] Free Report "YOU CAN PROFIT BY PRODUCING FOOD PRODUCTS FOR EXPORT"

       
      Tropical Food Production & Processing Special Report


      Over 1 billion people in the world live with hunger. Day and night, throughout their lives they never have enough to eat. Most of these hungry people are in the developing countries and the tropics. The solution is to get the people who live there to learn the skills of food production and processing and produce food in their own countries. The world is in crisis and many of these people live from the food exports from the usa. What happens if there is a breakdown in that flow. The farmers in their countries need to gsin the skills to produce and process foods. Because I want to help them I am offering a free report" Tropical Farmers Can Profit From Producing Food". It's free and covers all the steps needed to create a tropical food business. Feel free to download and print it for your use. www.solarentrep.com/tropical_food_report.htm



    • travelerinthyme
      I always imagined that people in the tropics could pick food off the jungle trees, and there would always be an abundance. But I suppose overpopulation and
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 15, 2012
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        I always imagined that people in the tropics could pick food off the jungle trees, and there would always be an abundance. But I suppose overpopulation and bad farming practices are everywhere, not just in my neighborhood.

        Good luck with your excellent project. I have some "edible weeds" from semi-tropical South Central Texas that I could harvest and send to you later this season (cilantro/coriander, chenopodium alba (lamb's quarters/goosefoot/wild spinach), mullein, Italian parsley, semi-wild lettuce that comes up like dandelions, and some seeds that have cross-pollinated from several heirloom varieties that survived our deadly hot dry summers and cold wet winters.

        Please keep in touch and remind me of this promise a bit later in the spring and summer?

        ~Marcia Cash, Traveler in Thyme
        Blanco Texas, zone 8-9
      • Javier Cosp Fontclara
        Marcia: Here in Paraguay it is not necessary to go to the jungle. I pick a lot of fruits in the streets of the capital, but it is not possible to eat only
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 15, 2012
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          Marcia: 

          Here in Paraguay it is not necessary to go to the jungle. I pick a lot of fruits in the streets 
          of the capital, but it is not possible to eat only mangos, guavas or avocados (and other fruits) 
          all the time. 

          The problem is not overpopulation or bad farming practices.  The problem is that 
          the spaniards came in 1492, they divided the land between them,(millions of hect├íreas
          each one) and also divided the indians to work their lands in a kind of feudal system. 

          Today something is changed but most of the land still remains in very few people, and 
          most of the campesinos dont have land. Those millions of hectareas are dedicated to 
          export products like cattle and soya (used to feed the cattle of other countries). So, we 
          have a lot of money thanks to export of cattle and soya, but the money goes to only 
          a small group of people and most of the people doesnt have money to buy the meat or 
          other food. The cows eat very well but the people dont. 

          The english in North America divided the land in small parcels that they cultivated themselves 
          and began a lot more egalitarian and democratic society where all had a little money 
          and that created the conditions for the industrialization of the country. 

          In short, the problem is more political than technical. 

          Javier Cosp


          To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          From: traveler.in.thyme@...
          Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2012 14:08:59 +0000
          Subject: [pfaf] Re: Free Report "YOU CAN PROFIT BY PRODUCING FOOD PRODUCTS FOR EXPORT"

           

          I always imagined that people in the tropics could pick food off the jungle trees, and there would always be an abundance. But I suppose overpopulation and bad farming practices are everywhere, not just in my neighborhood.

          Good luck with your excellent project. I have some "edible weeds" from semi-tropical South Central Texas that I could harvest and send to you later this season (cilantro/coriander, chenopodium alba (lamb's quarters/goosefoot/wild spinach), mullein, Italian parsley, semi-wild lettuce that comes up like dandelions, and some seeds that have cross-pollinated from several heirloom varieties that survived our deadly hot dry summers and cold wet winters.

          Please keep in touch and remind me of this promise a bit later in the spring and summer?

          ~Marcia Cash, Traveler in Thyme
          Blanco Texas, zone 8-9


        • travelerinthyme
          True, Javier, that food production is a political problem. Here in my neighborhood, a rocky ridge in Central Texas, there is a seam of good, deep soil all
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 16, 2012
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            True, Javier, that food production is a political problem. Here in my neighborhood, a rocky ridge in Central Texas, there is a seam of good, deep soil all around the hillsides at about 1600 feet, with nothing but rocks above and below. We are lucky to have a wide enough patch of "black gumbo" to make a big veggie garden and we have many tall oaks, but most of our neighbors have nothing but limestone and juniper scrub.

            Both next door neighbors also have a big patch of real soil, but use the open, flat spaces for parking junk cars and paving over for driveways. I wish there were some way I could talk them into letting me build beautiful gardens in their yards, I'd do it for FREE, but they get suspicious and want their privacy. City people who move to the "country" and don't know how to live like country people are a huge problem in Texas, where the laws favour the land owner, no matter what he does to his land.

            Perhaps we need a licence to prove ability to farm, like a license proving the ability to drive a car, before allowing people to occupy the ever-shrinking areas suitable for cultivation. Really, most people around here don't even know what they have! They all commute to the city and spend their time in the country relaxing instead of working their land, and spread their junk over 5 acres.

            My husband calls me an "Eco-Nazi", and it's true I love my trees more than most of my neighbors! <LOL>

            ~Marcia Cash, Traveler in Thyme
            Blanco County, Texas, zone 8-9
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