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Re: [pfaf] Edible plant leaves

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  • Michael Bell
    In message ... To say anything useful, we need to know where/in what climate you want to grow your plants. Michael Bell ... --
    Message 1 of 14 , Dec 13, 2011
      In message <jbtckk+go15@...>
      "Phil" <bmed19@...> wrote:

      > Hi PFAF members,

      > I am interested in the potential of growing edible plant leaves in
      > large quantities. Can edible leaves be produced at higher yields and
      > with less water and fertilizer than the grains from corn, rice, and
      > wheat? What are some leaf crops that can be produced at high yields
      > with minimal inputs?

      > Thanks

      To say anything useful, we need to know where/in what climate you want
      to grow your plants.

      Michael Bell


      > ------------------------------------

      > Yahoo! Groups Links





      --
    • Javier Cosp
      Here in Paraguay some cattle producers grow leucaena. It is a little toxic, so they introduce in the stomach of the cows a bacteria (?) that destroy the
      Message 2 of 14 , Dec 13, 2011

        Here in Paraguay some cattle producers grow leucaena.  It is a little toxic,
        so they introduce in the stomach of the cows a bacteria (?) that destroy the
        toxicity.

        Javier Cosp



        El 09/12/2011 12:22, Phil escribió:
         

        Hi PFAF members,

        I am interested in the potential of growing edible plant leaves in large quantities. Can edible leaves be produced at higher yields and with less water and fertilizer than the grains from corn, rice, and wheat? What are some leaf crops that can be produced at high yields with minimal inputs?

        Thanks

      • nova wright
        i am interested in this subject as well nova In a world of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act George Orwell ... From: Phil To:
        Message 3 of 14 , Dec 13, 2011
          i am interested in this subject as well
          nova
           
          "In a world of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act"  George Orwell
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Phil
          Sent: Friday, December 09, 2011 10:22 AM
          Subject: [pfaf] Edible plant leaves

           

          Hi PFAF members,

          I am interested in the potential of growing edible plant leaves in large quantities. Can edible leaves be produced at higher yields and with less water and fertilizer than the grains from corn, rice, and wheat? What are some leaf crops that can be produced at high yields with minimal inputs?

          Thanks

        • nova wright
          i am in midwest USA zone 5-6 some things that would be perennial elsewhere but could be treated as annual or held over in greenhouse are of interest here as
          Message 4 of 14 , Dec 13, 2011
            i am in midwest USA zone 5-6
            some things that would be perennial elsewhere but could be treated as annual or held over in greenhouse are of interest here as well
            nova
             
            "In a world of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act"  George Orwell
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 8:23 AM
            Subject: Re: [pfaf] Edible plant leaves

             

            In message <jbtckk+go15@...>
            "Phil" <bmed19@...> wrote:

            > Hi PFAF members,

            > I am interested in the potential of growing edible plant leaves in
            > large quantities. Can edible leaves be produced at higher yields and
            > with less water and fertilizer than the grains from corn, rice, and
            > wheat? What are some leaf crops that can be produced at high yields
            > with minimal inputs?

            > Thanks

            To say anything useful, we need to know where/in what climate you want
            to grow your plants.

            Michael Bell

            > ------------------------------------

            > Yahoo! Groups Links

            --

          • fran k
            me too. I would like to look over the research done on comfrey, because the experiments that were done were done feeding chickens and other animals with it
            Message 5 of 14 , Dec 13, 2011
              me too.

              I would like to look over the research done on comfrey, because the experiments that were done were done feeding chickens and other animals with it nearly 100%, and the chickens that at least had opportunity to peck in the odd verge suffered no physical ailment nor body weakness.

              I mean if you lived your whole life on nettles or any one thing anyone would suffer.

              other thing is I have a perrenial cabbage which grows like a bush. I reckon that looks promising.

              frank






              On Tue, Dec 13, 2011 15:03 GMT nova wright wrote:

              >i am interested in this subject as well
              >nova
              >
              >"In a world of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act" George Orwell
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Phil
              > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Friday, December 09, 2011 10:22 AM
              > Subject: [pfaf] Edible plant leaves
              >
              >
              >
              > Hi PFAF members,
              >
              > I am interested in the potential of growing edible plant leaves in large quantities. Can edible leaves be produced at higher yields and with less water and fertilizer than the grains from corn, rice, and wheat? What are some leaf crops that can be produced at high yields with minimal inputs?
              >
              > Thanks
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • nova wright
              what is the exact name of the cabbage you refer too Thanks nova In a world of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act George Orwell ...
              Message 6 of 14 , Dec 13, 2011
                
                what is the exact name of the cabbage you refer too
                Thanks
                nova
                 
                "In a world of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act"  George Orwell
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: fran k
                Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 10:20 AM
                Subject: Re: [pfaf] Edible plant leaves

                 


                me too.

                I would like to look over the research done on comfrey, because the experiments that were done were done feeding chickens and other animals with it nearly 100%, and the chickens that at least had opportunity to peck in the odd verge suffered no physical ailment nor body weakness.

                I mean if you lived your whole life on nettles or any one thing anyone would suffer.

                other thing is I have a perrenial cabbage which grows like a bush. I reckon that looks promising.

                frank

                On Tue, Dec 13, 2011 15:03 GMT nova wright wrote:

              • fran k
                hi, I dont know yet. I got it from Janta and merav of karuna permaculture farm. ill let you know when they find out. frank. in a world of artificial scarcity
                Message 7 of 14 , Dec 13, 2011
                  hi, I dont know yet. I got it from Janta and merav of karuna permaculture farm. ill let you know when they find out.

                  frank.

                  'in a world of artificial scarcity to be good is bad, and to be bad is good'


                  On Tue, Dec 13, 2011 16:35 GMT nova wright wrote:

                  >what is the exact name of the cabbage you refer too
                  >Thanks
                  >nova
                  >
                  >"In a world of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act" George Orwell
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: fran k
                  > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 10:20 AM
                  > Subject: Re: [pfaf] Edible plant leaves
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > me too.
                  >
                  > I would like to look over the research done on comfrey, because the experiments that were done were done feeding chickens and other animals with it nearly 100%, and the chickens that at least had opportunity to peck in the odd verge suffered no physical ailment nor body weakness.
                  >
                  > I mean if you lived your whole life on nettles or any one thing anyone would suffer.
                  >
                  > other thing is I have a perrenial cabbage which grows like a bush. I reckon that looks promising.
                  >
                  > frank
                  >
                  > On Tue, Dec 13, 2011 15:03 GMT nova wright wrote:
                  >
                  >
                • Infowolf1@aol.com
                  what is the bacteria and how do they do it? Infowolf1 ... From: Javier Cosp To: pfaf Sent: Tue, Dec 13, 2011 3:08 am
                  Message 8 of 14 , Dec 13, 2011
                    what is the bacteria and how do they do it?

                    Infowolf1


                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Javier Cosp <jcosp@...>
                    To: pfaf <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Tue, Dec 13, 2011 3:08 am
                    Subject: Re: [pfaf] Edible plant leaves

                     

                    Here in Paraguay some cattle producers grow leucaena.  It is a little toxic,
                    so they introduce in the stomach of the cows a bacteria (?) that destroy the
                    toxicity.

                    Javier Cosp



                    El 09/12/2011 12:22, Phil escribió:
                     
                    Hi PFAF members,

                    I am interested in the potential of growing edible plant leaves in large quantities. Can edible leaves be produced at higher yields and with less water and fertilizer than the grains from corn, rice, and wheat? What are some leaf crops that can be produced at high yields with minimal inputs?

                    Thanks

                  • ambyagro@yahoo.es
                    In Colombia we promote Moringa oleifera for human and cattle consumption. Is a high quality-quantity protein producer. Besides is a great erosion control
                    Message 9 of 14 , Dec 13, 2011
                      In Colombia we promote Moringa oleifera for human and cattle consumption. Is a high quality-quantity protein producer. Besides is a great erosion control plant
                      Enviado desde un dispositivo BlackBerry® de Tigo

                      From: Michael Bell <michael@...>
                      Sender: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Tue, 13 Dec 2011 14:23:25 GMT
                      To: <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
                      ReplyTo: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [pfaf] Edible plant leaves

                       

                      In message <jbtckk+go15@...>
                      "Phil" <bmed19@...> wrote:

                      > Hi PFAF members,

                      > I am interested in the potential of growing edible plant leaves in
                      > large quantities. Can edible leaves be produced at higher yields and
                      > with less water and fertilizer than the grains from corn, rice, and
                      > wheat? What are some leaf crops that can be produced at high yields
                      > with minimal inputs?

                      > Thanks

                      To say anything useful, we need to know where/in what climate you want
                      to grow your plants.

                      Michael Bell

                      > ------------------------------------

                      > Yahoo! Groups Links

                      --

                    • Javier Cosp
                      I dont know the name of the bacteria. I believe it is a technology from Australia. They inject the bacteria like a regular vaccine. Only a percentaje of the
                      Message 10 of 14 , Dec 14, 2011

                        I dont know the name of the bacteria. I believe it is a technology
                        from Australia.

                        They inject the bacteria like a regular vaccine. Only a percentaje
                        of the cows, then they infect each other through the manure.

                        Javier

                        El 13/12/2011 16:32, Infowolf1@... escribió:
                         

                        what is the bacteria and how do they do it?


                        Infowolf1


                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: Javier Cosp <jcosp@...>
                        To: pfaf <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Tue, Dec 13, 2011 3:08 am
                        Subject: Re: [pfaf] Edible plant leaves

                         

                        Here in Paraguay some cattle producers grow leucaena.  It is a little toxic,
                        so they introduce in the stomach of the cows a bacteria (?) that destroy the
                        toxicity.

                        Javier Cosp



                        El 09/12/2011 12:22, Phil escribió:
                         
                        Hi PFAF members,

                        I am interested in the potential of growing edible plant leaves in large quantities. Can edible leaves be produced at higher yields and with less water and fertilizer than the grains from corn, rice, and wheat? What are some leaf crops that can be produced at high yields with minimal inputs?

                        Thanks

                      • travelerinthyme
                        This is one of my favourite subjects: wild greens! Here in Texas we have been in the worst drought since the 1950 s , with record-breaking heat and cold
                        Message 11 of 14 , Dec 14, 2011
                          This is one of my favourite subjects: wild greens!

                          Here in Texas we have been in the worst drought since the 1950's , with record-breaking heat and cold spells. Even though I did not irrigate one drop for more than a year, our garden was full of "weeds", many of which were edible or medicinal.

                          Our favourite wild veggie is "chenopodium", aka lambs quarters or goosefoot, which tastes a lot like spinach when cooked, though it's a bit dry and tough when raw. Grows everywhere in America except extreme desert, poor soil no problem, in fact it enriches the soil if you leave the big roots in the ground to rot for organic matter.

                          Most of the lambs quarters we eat are just the thinnings, since Mother Nature plants 100 seeds where one plant would be plenty. Snip the tops off the seedlings and steam, stir fry, or put them in soups and casseroles. I dehydrated about a bushel of the stuff last spring, we are still eating "mysterious green powder" in a lot of recipes!

                          If you leave a few plants, spaced far apart, to grow to full size, you'll have a little Christmas tree with billions of seeds to save for next year. I actually have never planted any, it just sprouts all over the yard and we eat the "weeds" from lawn and flowerbeds. In fact, I toss most of it over the fence for the wildlife, the deer especially love it.

                          I have seen the seeds for sale in Nichol's Garden Nursery catalog.

                          The other "wild" greens in our garden are leaf lettuce and Italian parsley, which I planted many years ago, allowing a few plants to go to seed and then rearranging my garden plan around wherever they sprout next season. We usually have more greens to eat in winter (our rainy season), while summer brings fruits and veggies that like hot sun.

                          Chickweed, dead nettles, wild mustard, parsley, cilantro, wild lettuce. all these crops grow with not help from humans, and in fact help keep bugs away from your regular garden. Heirloom tomatoes can be a good "weed" too, and we often have green beans growing in odd places along the fenceline where I did not plant them.

                          In 40 years of observing wild foods and meds, I have learned that whatever is blooming is usually the cure for whatever ailments are going around at any given thyme.....isn't Nature sweet?

                          Get yourself a book on edible wild plants, a good herbal with Latin names, and few books on native wildflowers in your area, you'll be surprised at how many plants are in two or more of these books, that's how I taught myself.

                          ~Traveler in Thyme~
                          Marcia Cash, Blanco County, Texas Hill Country, zone 8-9
                        • Phil
                          Thank you! What a great response!
                          Message 12 of 14 , Dec 14, 2011
                            Thank you! What a great response!

                            --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "travelerinthyme" <traveler.in.thyme@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > This is one of my favourite subjects: wild greens!
                            >
                            > Here in Texas we have been in the worst drought since the 1950's , with record-breaking heat and cold spells. Even though I did not irrigate one drop for more than a year, our garden was full of "weeds", many of which were edible or medicinal.
                            >
                            > Our favourite wild veggie is "chenopodium", aka lambs quarters or goosefoot, which tastes a lot like spinach when cooked, though it's a bit dry and tough when raw. Grows everywhere in America except extreme desert, poor soil no problem, in fact it enriches the soil if you leave the big roots in the ground to rot for organic matter.
                            >
                            > Most of the lambs quarters we eat are just the thinnings, since Mother Nature plants 100 seeds where one plant would be plenty. Snip the tops off the seedlings and steam, stir fry, or put them in soups and casseroles. I dehydrated about a bushel of the stuff last spring, we are still eating "mysterious green powder" in a lot of recipes!
                            >
                            > If you leave a few plants, spaced far apart, to grow to full size, you'll have a little Christmas tree with billions of seeds to save for next year. I actually have never planted any, it just sprouts all over the yard and we eat the "weeds" from lawn and flowerbeds. In fact, I toss most of it over the fence for the wildlife, the deer especially love it.
                            >
                            > I have seen the seeds for sale in Nichol's Garden Nursery catalog.
                            >
                            > The other "wild" greens in our garden are leaf lettuce and Italian parsley, which I planted many years ago, allowing a few plants to go to seed and then rearranging my garden plan around wherever they sprout next season. We usually have more greens to eat in winter (our rainy season), while summer brings fruits and veggies that like hot sun.
                            >
                            > Chickweed, dead nettles, wild mustard, parsley, cilantro, wild lettuce. all these crops grow with not help from humans, and in fact help keep bugs away from your regular garden. Heirloom tomatoes can be a good "weed" too, and we often have green beans growing in odd places along the fenceline where I did not plant them.
                            >
                            > In 40 years of observing wild foods and meds, I have learned that whatever is blooming is usually the cure for whatever ailments are going around at any given thyme.....isn't Nature sweet?
                            >
                            > Get yourself a book on edible wild plants, a good herbal with Latin names, and few books on native wildflowers in your area, you'll be surprised at how many plants are in two or more of these books, that's how I taught myself.
                            >
                            > ~Traveler in Thyme~
                            > Marcia Cash, Blanco County, Texas Hill Country, zone 8-9
                            >
                          • Michael Porter
                            Chaya Leaves, in warm climates?[areas with no frost]  Hi PFAF members, I am interested in the potential of growing edible plant leaves in large quantities.
                            Message 13 of 14 , Dec 15, 2011
                              Chaya Leaves, in warm climates?[areas with no frost] 
                              Hi PFAF members,

                              I am interested in the potential of growing edible plant leaves in large quantities. Can edible leaves be produced at higher yields and with less water and fertilizer than the grains from corn, rice, and wheat? What are some leaf crops that can be produced at high yields with minimal inputs?

                              Thanks

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