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Apple tree questions

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  • Barbara Ebel
    Two things, This year our apple tree which in normally very fruitful, only has apples on the lower 1/3 of the branches.  Does this mean anything to anyone?
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 13, 2011
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      Two things,

      This year our apple tree which in normally very fruitful, only has apples on the lower 1/3 of the branches.  Does this mean anything to anyone?

      Second, I have noticed white fluffly stuff on the tree,  I think its some sort of fungus.  It looks almost like a bit of thready fluff off a cotton ball.  This is new to our apple tree.  

      Any help appreciated.

      Barbara Ebel
      http://www.couturecostume.com
      http://www.greenknowe.org


    • Geir Flatabø
      In Norway we have had the coldest / wettest summer i years, and apple harvest is about 10% of normal, due t cold weather i flowering time. White fluff on
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 13, 2011
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        In Norway we have had the coldest / wettest summer i years,  and apple harvest is about 10% of normal, due t cold weather i flowering time.
         
        White fluff on apple trees here would usually mean a "Mildew" fungus, only showing in dry hot weather, not this year.
         
        Geir Flatabø

        2011/10/14 Barbara Ebel <pinandweb@...>


        Two things,

        This year our apple tree which in normally very fruitful, only has apples on the lower 1/3 of the branches.  Does this mean anything to anyone?

        Second, I have noticed white fluffly stuff on the tree,  I think its some sort of fungus.  It looks almost like a bit of thready fluff off a cotton ball.  This is new to our apple tree.  

        Any help appreciated.

        Barbara Ebel





      • Stella H Howell
        Chemtrails that are sprayed upon the earth are deliberate diseases caused to all living things including plants. The aim is for GMO Apples to be introduced.
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 13, 2011
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          Chemtrails that are sprayed upon the earth are deliberate diseases caused to all living things including
          plants.
           
          The aim is for GMO Apples to be introduced.
          Unless you grow produce under cover, nothing will survive.
           
          Did you know they have even modified pests.
           
          You may choose to ignore.

          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Friday, October 14, 2011 12:00 AM
          Subject: [pfaf] Apple tree questions

           

          Two things,

          This year our apple tree which in normally very fruitful, only has apples on the lower 1/3 of the branches.  Does this mean anything to anyone?

          Second, I have noticed white fluffly stuff on the tree,  I think its some sort of fungus.  It looks almost like a bit of thready fluff off a cotton ball.  This is new to our apple tree.  

          Any help appreciated.

          Barbara Ebel
          http://www.couturecostume.com
          http://www.greenknowe.org


        • Elaine Sommers
          In England, I live on the East Coast, we have had an absolute glut of apples. People can t give them away. We had the hot dry spring, wet summer and now a hot
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 14, 2011
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            In England, I live on the East Coast, we have had an absolute glut of apples. People can't give them away. We had the hot dry spring, wet summer and now a hot then wet autumn. Plums and pears have been massive too. We have had pears from someone's 140 yr old tree which was just heaving. Strawberries are even still flowering and some coming into fruit. Everything is weird.

            Blessings,
            Elaine.

             
             
             
             
             
            ". . . the greatest peril of life lies in the fact that human food consists entirely of souls. All the creatures that we have to kill to eat, all those that we have to strike down and destroy to make clothes for ourselves, have souls, souls that do not perish with the body . . . All that exists lives."
             
            from 'Shaman, the wounded healer' by J. Halifax, 1982





            To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
            From: geirf@...
            Date: Fri, 14 Oct 2011 08:29:29 +0200
            Subject: Re: [pfaf] Apple tree questions

             

            In Norway we have had the coldest / wettest summer i years,  and apple harvest is about 10% of normal, due t cold weather i flowering time.
             
            White fluff on apple trees here would usually mean a "Mildew" fungus, only showing in dry hot weather, not this year.
             
            Geir Flatabø

            2011/10/14 Barbara Ebel <pinandweb@...>


            Two things,

            This year our apple tree which in normally very fruitful, only has apples on the lower 1/3 of the branches.  Does this mean anything to anyone?

            Second, I have noticed white fluffly stuff on the tree,  I think its some sort of fungus.  It looks almost like a bit of thready fluff off a cotton ball.  This is new to our apple tree.  

            Any help appreciated.

            Barbara Ebel






          • Ken Fern
            Dear Barbara It is almost certainly woolly aphid. Below is a fact sheet from the BBC
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 14, 2011
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              Dear Barbara

               

               

              It is almost certainly woolly aphid. Below is a fact sheet from the BBC (http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/advice/pests_and_diseases/identifier.shtml?apple_woolly_aphid) which might be of help. It has good information on organic treatment and preventionamd even their chemical treatment is based on Pyrethrum, a plant-based insecticide.

               

               

              I hope this is useful

               

              Ken Fern

               

              Look for

              Long white, or occasionally blue-grey, waxy residues which look like cotton wool appear on the bark and branches especially around old pruning wounds. There may also be droplets of sticky, sugary honeydew on the bark which may become infected with black sooty mould. Cankers may also be present on aphid infested areas.

              Plants affected

              ·         Apple, pear, prunus, crab apple, pyracantha, cotoneaster, elm, hawthorn and mountain ash trees.

              About Apple woolly aphid

              ·         Adult aphids are up to 2mm long and elliptical in shape. They are pinkish-brown but their waxy coating gives them a white, woolly appearance.

              ·         This species does not overwinter as eggs but as young, under loose bark, or in cracks in bark or surface roots.

              ·         Young emerge in spring to re-establish the colony.

              ·         Aphids can give birth to as many as five live young a day so rapidly produce large colonies.

              ·         After a few generations, winged adults develop and move to new trees.

              ·         Colonies will develop around cracks and wounds in trees, as well as new shoots.

              ·         Feeding by apple woolly aphids will cause knobbly galls to form making the tree more susceptible to canker and other infections.

              ·         Aphids feed on plant sap and excrete plant sugars as honeydew.

              ·         Honeydew often covers the leaves of a plant and then becomes infested with unsightly black sooty moulds.

              Treatment

              Chemical

              Products containing the following chemical ingredients are all effective on Apple woolly aphid

              ·         Pyrethroids and Pyrethrin

              Note: It is important to read manufacturer's instructions for use and the associated safety data information before applying chemical treatments.

              Organic

              ·         Check tree shoots and bark regularly for signs of woolly aphid.

              ·         Scrub areas within easy reach with a brush and a bucket of soapy water.

              ·         Spray infested areas with a firm jet of water to help reduce aphid numbers.

              ·         Spray with natural fatty acids such as an insecticidal soap.

              ·         The parasitic wasp Aphelinus mali will attack aphids above ground level.

              ·         Aphid predators such as ladybirds, aphidoletes, hoverflies, and lacewing larvae can be encouraged by providing suitable overwintering sites and by growing flowers which attract them.

              Prevention

              ·         Regularly check plants for signs of infestation and deal with them as soon as they appear.

              ·         Encourage natural enemies like ladybirds, hoverflies and lacewings to become established in the garden by planting daisy-like flowers, yellow flowers and in particular, the poached egg plant Limnanthes douglasii.

              ·         Avoid using broad spectrum insecticides which will kill beneficial insects as well as aphids.

              ·         Encourage insect-eating birds such as blue tits, by hanging feeders in winter and nest boxes in spring.

              ·         If planting new apple trees, use rootstocks which are resistant to apple woolly aphid.

              ·         Paint pruning wounds with a tree coating composition to help prevent infestations establishing.

               

            • Allmende Verden
              Like Geir told about Norway, in the colder areas of lower sachsony most pome´s flowers freezed this year. The flowers that survived are on the top of the
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 14, 2011
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                Like Geir told about Norway, in the colder areas of lower sachsony
                most pome´s flowers freezed this year. The flowers that survived are
                on the top of the crown. It seems to me that this problem also
                affected other fruit like cherry, aronia, xanthoxylum, elaeagnus,
                pear, amelanchier... Maybe the cold spring-nights after a long cold
                winter did harm to the pollinating insects, which then even found only
                few flowers for most where frozen.
                We also had a very big plum-harvest, and also hasel!
                greetings from Steph

                Zitat von Elaine Sommers <elainesommers@...>:

                > In England, I live on the East Coast, we have had an absolute glut
                > of apples. People can't give them away. We had the hot dry spring,
                > wet summer and now a hot then wet autumn. Plums and pears have been
                > massive too. We have had pears from someone's 140 yr old tree which
                > was just heaving. Strawberries are even still flowering and some
                > coming into fruit. Everything is weird.
                >
                > Blessings,
                > Elaine.
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ". . . the greatest peril of life lies in the fact that human food
                > consists entirely of souls. All the creatures that we have to kill
                > to eat, all those that we have to strike down and destroy to make
                > clothes for ourselves, have souls, souls that do not perish with the
                > body . . . All that exists lives."
                >
                > from 'Shaman, the wounded healer' by J. Halifax, 1982
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                > From: geirf@...
                > Date: Fri, 14 Oct 2011 08:29:29 +0200
                > Subject: Re: [pfaf] Apple tree questions
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > In Norway we have had the coldest / wettest summer i years,
                > and apple harvest is about 10% of normal, due t cold weather i
                > flowering time.
                >
                > White fluff on apple trees here would usually mean a "Mildew"
                > fungus, only showing in dry hot weather, not this year.
                >
                > Geir Flatabø
                >
                >
                > 2011/10/14 Barbara Ebel <pinandweb@...>
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Two things,
                >
                >
                > This year our apple tree which in normally very fruitful, only has
                > apples on the lower 1/3 of the branches. Does this mean anything to
                > anyone?
                >
                >
                > Second, I have noticed white fluffly stuff on the tree, I think its
                > some sort of fungus. It looks almost like a bit of thready fluff
                > off a cotton ball. This is new to our apple tree.
                >
                >
                > Any help appreciated.
                >
                >
                > Barbara Ebel
                > http://www.couturecostume.com
                > http://www.greenknowe.org



                Allmende e.V.-Gemeinschaftlicher Permakulturgarten für Verden
                Artilleriestr. 6
                D-27283 Verden
                Tel (+49) 4231- 90 30 470 (lange aufs Klingeln warten)
                Mobil (+49) 17 66166 8718
                http://www.allmende.de.vu
                Kurze und lange Aufenthalte im Gartenprojekt oft möglich!
              • trentrhode
                Hi Stella, I would be interested to understand why you are so certain of this. Diseases have not occurred where I am despite the chemtrails, and I have heard
                Message 7 of 7 , Oct 14, 2011
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                  Hi Stella, I would be interested to understand why you are so certain of this. Diseases have not occurred where I am despite the chemtrails, and I have heard many theories about what they are for - this being the first time I've heard this one.

                  --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Stella H Howell" <stella@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Chemtrails that are sprayed upon the earth are deliberate diseases caused to all living things including
                  > plants.
                  >
                  > The aim is for GMO Apples to be introduced.
                  > Unless you grow produce under cover, nothing will survive.
                  >
                  > Did you know they have even modified pests.
                  >
                  > You may choose to ignore.
                  >
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: Barbara Ebel
                  > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Friday, October 14, 2011 12:00 AM
                  > Subject: [pfaf] Apple tree questions
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Two things,
                  >
                  >
                  > This year our apple tree which in normally very fruitful, only has apples on the lower 1/3 of the branches. Does this mean anything to anyone?
                  >
                  >
                  > Second, I have noticed white fluffly stuff on the tree, I think its some sort of fungus. It looks almost like a bit of thready fluff off a cotton ball. This is new to our apple tree.
                  >
                  >
                  > Any help appreciated.
                  >
                  >
                  > Barbara Ebel
                  > http://www.couturecostume.com
                  > http://www.greenknowe.org
                  >
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