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Re: [pfaf] chenopodium, aka goosefoot, lambs quarters

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  • inverse
    ... very high in vitamin C, extremetly high in vitamin A, high in the B family. Mineral: very high in calcium, phosphorous and iron. The aminoacid distribution
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 29, 2011
      On Wed, Sep 28, 2011 at 9:52 PM, Infowolf1 <Infowolf1@...> wrote:
       

      what's the vitamins minerals content?


      very high in vitamin C, extremetly high in vitamin A, high in the B family.
      Mineral: very high in calcium, phosphorous and iron.

      The aminoacid distribution is almost perfect. I'll soon post a reference with a detailed aminoacid analysis of chenopodium album seeds. 
      The pfaf entry for C. Album  reports more data.


    • inverse
      ... Although there are no know cases of poisoning in the scientific literature, the oxalic acid content could be of concern to those suffering of kidney
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 29, 2011
        On Thu, Sep 29, 2011 at 3:56 PM, orb orb <orb1806@...> wrote:
         


        Don't overdo it chenopodium has oxalic acid in it (like rhubarb, sorrol and spinage) so if you eat a lot them all you coulld find yourself with problems.


        Although there are no know cases of poisoning in the scientific literature, the oxalic acid content could be of concern to those suffering of kidney diseases. 
        However chenopodium leaves are usually eaten after cooking and this practice is known to remove most oxalic acid and oxalates from the edible matter.
        I've read of a case where eating very large amounts of chenopodium leaves produced laxative effects, but this is inconclusive to say the least.

        One this is clear, small amounts of raw fresh leaves (around 100g) can't do any harm and due to their very high vitamin C content are particularly beneficial.

        One analysis reports this:
        ascorbic acid (vitamin C) amounts from 220.97 to 377.65 mg / 100g of leaves and β-carotene content was 19.00 to 24.64 mg/100 g.
        Another source reports 155mg of ascorbic acid.

        This means 50 gram of leaves give much more than the daily recommended dosage of vitamin C!

        I also forgot to mention the high levels of potassium within the seeds and leaves.


      • inverse
        ... Geir: I ve been in Nordland this summer and I can confirm that. By the way, I fell in love with the Lofoten islands, particularly with Flakstad and
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 29, 2011
          On Wed, Sep 28, 2011 at 6:04 PM, Geir Flatabø <geirf@...> wrote:
           

          Fascinating indeed,
          as in "wet Norway " it grows everywhere as a weed far north of polar Circle....

          Geir: 
          I've been in Nordland this summer and I can confirm that. By the way, I fell in love with the Lofoten islands, particularly with Flakstad and Moskenes..
          I also wonder why chenopodium had been globally abandoned as a seed source. Its incredible adaptability and very high seed production would indeed be beneficial :\
          Within 1 month I'll have the seed yield data for my chenopodium plots available for posting :D
          some plants peaked near 4 meters of height and are now recumbent due to the weight of their seeds XD
          (by the end of october / mid november they'll be ready to harvest) 




           
        • inverse
          On Wed, Sep 28, 2011 at 3:23 PM, travelerinthyme
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 29, 2011
            On Wed, Sep 28, 2011 at 3:23 PM, travelerinthyme <traveler.in.thyme@...> wrote:
             

            Chenopodium, aka goosefoot or lambs quarters, is my favourite "weed". We have chenopodium alba growing wild here in the Central Texas Hill Country, where it is still alive in the shady spots even though we have only had 3" of rain in the past year, and the temps have been over 100 degrees more than 25% of the days. Here it is the last of Sept, 101 in the shade, but in the shade, the lambs quarters are scrawny but going to seed.


             The drought resistance of chenopodiums is notoriously extraordinary.
            Here we had repeated periods of high temperature and no rain, some as long as 1-1.5 months, while most grasses withered the chenopodiums didn't show any visible stress. Actually, along with taraxacum officinale, C. album has been the only other plant that didn't need any kind of watering, ever.
            Your specimens, however, are legendary :D


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