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Re: Alternatives to soap nuts

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  • travelerinthyme
    As a remnant of real Texas pioneer farm folks, I can honestly say that washing machines are one of my favourite inventions, having spent too many hours of my
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 9, 2011
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      As a remnant of real Texas pioneer farm folks, I can honestly say that washing machines are one of my favourite inventions, having spent too many hours of my childhood using a hand crank wringer washer and homemade lye soap that burned the eyes and left the clothes dingy yellow. Unless you use bluing, of course, do they even make bluing anymore?

      We have rainwater collection cisterns, and are very conscious of water use in this 9 month drought, but we bought the smallest front loader washing machine that Sears makes, because front loaders use less than half the water of top loaders, and unscented concentrated liquid detergent that only needs a tablespoon for a regular load, maybe 1 1/2 tablespoons for heavy grime.

      Making your own soap and doing the wash by hand uses more energy than modern, efficient machines and detergents, that's why They invented them!

      ~Marcia Cash, Traveler in Thyme
      from the cotton fields of North Dallas in the last century
      (when Dallas had cotton fields!)
    • Peter Ellis
      Hi I applaud your pragmatism ! I m all for natural solutions, but not if there is a better way for something. I didn t know top loaders were still made. I
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 9, 2011
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        Hi

        I applaud your pragmatism ! I'm all for natural solutions, but not if
        there is a better way for something. I didn't know top loaders were
        still made. I certainly remember the big ones of my youth, with an
        electric wringer mounted on top. I haven't seen blue bags in years.
        There was a mine that produced it in the detached part of Lancashire on
        the road to Barrow in Furness and every building was blue with the dust.

        Cheers

        Peter


        travelerinthyme wrote:
        >
        > As a remnant of real Texas pioneer farm folks, I can honestly say that
        > washing machines are one of my favourite inventions, having spent too
        > many hours of my childhood using a hand crank wringer washer and
        > homemade lye soap that burned the eyes and left the clothes dingy
        > yellow. Unless you use bluing, of course, do they even make bluing
        > anymore?
        >
        > We have rainwater collection cisterns, and are very conscious of water
        > use in this 9 month drought, but we bought the smallest front loader
        > washing machine that Sears makes, because front loaders use less than
        > half the water of top loaders, and unscented concentrated liquid
        > detergent that only needs a tablespoon for a regular load, maybe 1 1/2
        > tablespoons for heavy grime.
        >
        > Making your own soap and doing the wash by hand uses more energy than
        > modern, efficient machines and detergents, that's why They invented them!
        >
        > ~Marcia Cash, Traveler in Thyme
        > from the cotton fields of North Dallas in the last century
        > (when Dallas had cotton fields!)
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        >
        > No virus found in this message.
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        >
      • Elaine Sommers
        They still use hand or top loaders in Mexico where I used to live. I loved my top loader (after trying to wash sheets by hand previously anything was better!)
        Message 3 of 10 , Jun 9, 2011
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          They still use hand or top loaders in Mexico where I used to live. I loved my top loader (after trying to wash sheets by hand previously anything was better!) It saved water too because I could wash the not so dirty things in the first wash, spin them in the attacher spinner, then wash the dirtier things in the same water and spin them too. Different water for rinsing but the same process.

          The only reason I mentioned hand cranked washers is the impending peak-oil senario. I would hate to go back to complete hand washing, even if some of my Mexican neighbours used to enjoy washing that way. They found it theraputic. But not if they had full-time jobs.

          My neighbour used lemon juice to get stains out of cuffs and collars - putting the juice on them and leaving in the sun to bleach for 30 mins. It is tips like these that are really useful.

          In the olden days (tudor times) in the UK they used wood ash and urine to make washing detergent.

          The same thing with using liquidisers and processors. In Mexico City they all used the electronic devices but in the countryside many of them still preferred to use stone grinding to make everything including salsas. In the City they used hand pulled devices to make perfect juice. It was a revelation to me.

          Blessings,
          Elaine.



           
           
           
           
           
          ". . . the greatest peril of life lies in the fact that human food consists entirely of souls. All the creatures that we have to kill to eat, all those that we have to strike down and destroy to make clothes for ourselves, have souls, souls that do not perish with the body . . . All that exists lives."
           
          from 'Shaman, the wounded healer' by J. Halifax, 1982






          > To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
          > From: peter.ellis@...
          > Date: Thu, 9 Jun 2011 15:45:11 +0200
          > Subject: Re: [pfaf] Re: Alternatives to soap nuts
          >
          > Hi
          >
          > I applaud your pragmatism ! I'm all for natural solutions, but not if
          > there is a better way for something. I didn't know top loaders were
          > still made. I certainly remember the big ones of my youth, with an
          > electric wringer mounted on top. I haven't seen blue bags in years.
          > There was a mine that produced it in the detached part of Lancashire on
          > the road to Barrow in Furness and every building was blue with the dust.
          >
          > Cheers
          >
          > Peter
          >
          >
          > travelerinthyme wrote:
          > >
          > > As a remnant of real Texas pioneer farm folks, I can honestly say that
          > > washing machines are one of my favourite inventions, having spent too
          > > many hours of my childhood using a hand crank wringer washer and
          > > homemade lye soap that burned the eyes and left the clothes dingy
          > > yellow. Unless you use bluing, of course, do they even make bluing
          > > anymore?
          > >
          > > We have rainwater collection cisterns, and are very conscious of water
          > > use in this 9 month drought, but we bought the smallest front loader
          > > washing machine that Sears makes, because front loaders use less than
          > > half the water of top loaders, and unscented concentrated liquid
          > > detergent that only needs a tablespoon for a regular load, maybe 1 1/2
          > > tablespoons for heavy grime.
          > >
          > > Making your own soap and doing the wash by hand uses more energy than
          > > modern, efficient machines and detergents, that's why They invented them!
          > >
          > > ~Marcia Cash, Traveler in Thyme
          > > from the cotton fields of North Dallas in the last century
          > > (when Dallas had cotton fields!)
          > >
          > >
          > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > >
          > > No virus found in this message.
          > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com>
          > > Version: 10.0.1382 / Virus Database: 1513/3689 - Release Date: 06/08/11
          > >
          >
          >
          >
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        • Peter Ellis
          ... My mother lamented the passing of her top loader to a fully automatic machine for the same reason. Whites first, then coloureds, with dirty overalls in the
          Message 4 of 10 , Jun 9, 2011
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            Elaine Sommers wrote:
            >
            >
            > They still use hand or top loaders in Mexico where I used to live. I
            > loved my top loader (after trying to wash sheets by hand previously
            > anything was better!) It saved water too because I could wash the not
            > so dirty things in the first wash, spin them in the attacher spinner,
            > then wash the dirtier things in the same water and spin them too.
            > Different water for rinsing but the same process.
            >
            My mother lamented the passing of her top loader to a fully automatic
            machine for the same reason. Whites first, then coloureds, with dirty
            overalls in the final wash.

            Cheers

            Peter
          • Matthew Sleigh
            On Fri, Jun 10, 2011 at 3:35 AM, Peter Ellis ... Here (in the Philippines countryside) I have only seen washing by hand (bashing with wooden paddles) and top
            Message 5 of 10 , Jun 9, 2011
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              On Fri, Jun 10, 2011 at 3:35 AM, Peter Ellis
              <peter.ellis@...> wrote:
              > Elaine Sommers wrote:
              >> They still use hand or top loaders in Mexico where I used to live. I

              Here (in the Philippines countryside) I have only seen washing by hand
              (bashing with wooden paddles) and top loaders. Concrete washing basins
              can still be seen in rural areas of France, Portugal and Spain, some
              were still being used in the Minervoise recently, despite the water
              crisis. In the Philippines water is cheap and abundant, except in El
              Nino years.

              Unripe Star fruit and Iba (Averrhoa bilimbi and Averrhoa carambola)
              can be used to bleach cloth (notably removing rust stains) and have
              anti-bacterial properties. Watermelon also has anti-bacterial
              properties.

              Any plant parts containing saponins will be lipophilic (fat-loving
              "dirt magnets") some are used in commercial products.

              All the best,
              Matthew

              Matthew Sleigh
              P-2, North Poblacion
              Don Carlos, Bukidnon
              8712
              Philippines

              matthew@...
              http://b-and-t-world-seeds.com/
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