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Re: [pfaf] Groundnut question

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  • elrowe@umich.edu
    ... The latin name for American Groundnut is Apios Americana. Ellen Rowe
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 13, 2004
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      Quoting Hilary Robinson <hilrobinson@...>:

      > Hi Hilary -

      The latin name for American Groundnut is Apios Americana.

      Ellen Rowe
      >
      >
      >
      > American groundnut?
      >
      > This is obviously not the same groundnut as we in England also know as
      >
      > peanut, which is a fairly low-growing herbaceous plant(and not hardy in most
      >
      > of Britain, though we do get the odd unexpected plant when grey squirrels
      >
      > have stolen the seeds from bird-feeders and buried them). Just out of
      >
      > curiosity, do you have a Latin name?
      >
      > Regards, Hilary Robinson
      >
      >
      >
      > >From: "Robert Waldrop" <rmwj@...>
      >
      > >Reply-To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > >To: <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
      >
      > >Subject: Re: [pfaf] Groundnut question
      >
      > >Date: Sat, 12 Jun 2004 17:29:11 -0500
      >
      > >
      >
      > >Dig it up and sell it by mail order, maybe on Ebay
      >
      > >or through announcements in lists like this.
      >
      > >Hmmm, probably best to do this in the fall or
      >
      > >spring but I am not an expert on groundnut.  It's
      >
      > >not readily available as far as I know.  Your
      >
      > >problem could be somebody else's blessing.
      >
      > >
      >
      > >Robert Waldrop, Oklahoma City
      >
      > >
      >
      > >----- Original Message -----
      >
      > >From: "ellenrowe2004" <elrowe@...>
      >
      > > >    My family's property in Maine is being taken
      >
      > >over by American
      >
      > > > groundnut.  I have been reading up on it and
      >
      > >realize that it is a
      >
      > > > plant that many people try and cultivate as the
      >
      > >tubers are edible,
      >
      > > > but it is acting like kudzu, climbing up young
      >
      > >saplings and pulling
      >
      > > > them down and generally creating a canopy over
      >
      > >the vegetation
      >
      > > > that we originally planted. It seems to spread
      >
      > >so quickly that it is
      >
      > > > impossible to control it by mere weeding (we are
      >
      > >not there
      >
      > > > throughout the summer and it grows out of
      >
      > >control during our
      >
      > > > abscence)
      >
      > > >   Does anyone have any ideas as to how we could
      >
      > >either
      >
      > > > eradicate it or control it in as eco-friendly a
      >
      > >manner possible?
      >
      > > >
      >
      > > > Thanks for any help or advice you can give me!
      >
      > > >
      >
      > > > Ellen Rowe
      >
      > > >
      >
      > >
      >
      > >
      >
      > >
      >
      > >
      >
      > >
      >
      > >Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
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      > >
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    • KenFern
      The Latin name is Apios americana. It has a huge potential as a food crop - look it up in the PFAF database. Ken Fern ... From: Hilary Robinson
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 14, 2004
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        The Latin name is Apios americana. It has a huge potential as a food crop -
        look it up in the PFAF database.

        Ken Fern

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Hilary Robinson" <hilrobinson@...>
        To: <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, June 13, 2004 9:48 PM
        Subject: Re: [pfaf] Groundnut question


        > American groundnut?
        > This is obviously not the same groundnut as we in England also know as
        > peanut, which is a fairly low-growing herbaceous plant(and not hardy in
        most
        > of Britain, though we do get the odd unexpected plant when grey squirrels
        > have stolen the seeds from bird-feeders and buried them). Just out of
        > curiosity, do you have a Latin name?
        > Regards, Hilary Robinson
        >
        > >From: "Robert Waldrop" <rmwj@...>
        > >Reply-To: pfaf@yahoogroups.com
        > >To: <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
        > >Subject: Re: [pfaf] Groundnut question
        > >Date: Sat, 12 Jun 2004 17:29:11 -0500
        > >
        > >Dig it up and sell it by mail order, maybe on Ebay
        > >or through announcements in lists like this.
        > >Hmmm, probably best to do this in the fall or
        > >spring but I am not an expert on groundnut. It's
        > >not readily available as far as I know. Your
        > >problem could be somebody else's blessing.
        > >
        > >Robert Waldrop, Oklahoma City
        > >
        > >----- Original Message -----
        > >From: "ellenrowe2004" <elrowe@...>
        > > > My family's property in Maine is being taken
        > >over by American
        > > > groundnut. I have been reading up on it and
        > >realize that it is a
        > > > plant that many people try and cultivate as the
        > >tubers are edible,
        > > > but it is acting like kudzu, climbing up young
        > >saplings and pulling
        > > > them down and generally creating a canopy over
        > >the vegetation
        > > > that we originally planted. It seems to spread
        > >so quickly that it is
        > > > impossible to control it by mere weeding (we are
        > >not there
        > > > throughout the summer and it grows out of
        > >control during our
        > > > abscence)
        > > > Does anyone have any ideas as to how we could
        > >either
        > > > eradicate it or control it in as eco-friendly a
        > >manner possible?
        > > >
        > > > Thanks for any help or advice you can give me!
        > > >
        > > > Ellen Rowe
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • KenFern
        Hi Can I ask just how vigorous your plants are? My information is that the plant rarely grows more than 4 feet high (though occasional plants I am growing here
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 14, 2004
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          Hi

          Can I ask just how vigorous your plants are? My information is that the
          plant rarely grows more than 4 feet high (though occasional plants I am
          growing here have managed to get 5 feet into a young hawthorn). If your
          plants are more vigorous than this, then I assume you have identified them
          correctly?

          Have you visited http://plants.usda.gov/. There is a lot of info here about
          native American plants.

          As to controlling it, if you are certain that it is Apios americana then,
          after saving a few tubers and sending them to me at

          Plants for a Future
          The Field
          Penpol
          Lostwithiel
          Cornwall
          PL22 0NG

          (actually, you don't have to, but I wouldn't be upset if a few tubers found
          there way to Cornwall!!!)

          You could try controlling it by cutting down all the growth each time you
          are there (which will weaken it considerably) and then thoroughly raking the
          top few inches of the soil during the dormant season. Most of the tubers
          will be found in this shallow depth of soil - try baking them, they are
          delicious. Repeat this for a couple of years and you should find a very
          considerable reduction in the amount of plants growing. You can then simply
          keep the plant in control by raking each dormant period and eating most of
          the tubers.

          This is not the fastest way of controlling it, but is safer than chemicals.
          If the plants were not growing in amongst your other plants then sheet
          mulching would be the best answer - when applied in the spring it gives
          total eradication within 18 months and also re-fertilizes the soil.

          Hope this is of some help'

          Ken Fern

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "ellenrowe2004" <elrowe@...>
          To: <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Friday, June 11, 2004 8:18 PM
          Subject: [pfaf] Groundnut question


          > Hi -
          > My family's property in Maine is being taken over by American
          > groundnut. I have been reading up on it and realize that it is a
          > plant that many people try and cultivate as the tubers are edible,
          > but it is acting like kudzu, climbing up young saplings and pulling
          > them down and generally creating a canopy over the vegetation
          > that we originally planted. It seems to spread so quickly that it is
          > impossible to control it by mere weeding (we are not there
          > throughout the summer and it grows out of control during our
          > abscence)
          > Does anyone have any ideas as to how we could either
          > eradicate it or control it in as eco-friendly a manner possible?
          >
          > Thanks for any help or advice you can give me!
          >
          > Ellen Rowe
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Ellen Rowe
          Hi Ken - Thank you for your advice! I can t say that I have ever seen these plants going higher than 3 feet as they often twine around each other and make a
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 14, 2004
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            Hi Ken -

            Thank you for your advice! I can't say that I have ever seen these
            plants going higher than 3 feet as they often twine around each other and
            make a canopy over ferns and small saplings around 2 feet off the ground.
            The identification came from a vascular plant specialist at the Herbarium
            at the University of Michigan where I teach, so I assume it is correct. I
            will happily send you some tubers when I get back up there in late July or
            early August, but will be doing my best to discourage it after that!

            Ellen Rowe

            --On Monday, June 14, 2004 10:44 AM +0100 KenFern <ken.fern@...>
            wrote:

            > Hi
            >
            > Can I ask just how vigorous your plants are? My information is that the
            > plant rarely grows more than 4 feet high (though occasional plants I am
            > growing here have managed to get 5 feet into a young hawthorn). If your
            > plants are more vigorous than this, then I assume you have identified them
            > correctly?
            >
            > Have you visited http://plants.usda.gov/. There is a lot of info here
            > about native American plants.
            >
            > As to controlling it, if you are certain that it is Apios americana then,
            > after saving a few tubers and sending them to me at
            >
            > Plants for a Future
            > The Field
            > Penpol
            > Lostwithiel
            > Cornwall
            > PL22 0NG
            >
            > (actually, you don't have to, but I wouldn't be upset if a few tubers
            > found there way to Cornwall!!!)
            >
            > You could try controlling it by cutting down all the growth each time you
            > are there (which will weaken it considerably) and then thoroughly raking
            > the top few inches of the soil during the dormant season. Most of the
            > tubers will be found in this shallow depth of soil - try baking them,
            > they are delicious. Repeat this for a couple of years and you should find
            > a very considerable reduction in the amount of plants growing. You can
            > then simply keep the plant in control by raking each dormant period and
            > eating most of the tubers.
            >
            > This is not the fastest way of controlling it, but is safer than
            > chemicals. If the plants were not growing in amongst your other plants
            > then sheet mulching would be the best answer - when applied in the spring
            > it gives total eradication within 18 months and also re-fertilizes the
            > soil.
            >
            > Hope this is of some help'
            >
            > Ken Fern
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: "ellenrowe2004" <elrowe@...>
            > To: <pfaf@yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Friday, June 11, 2004 8:18 PM
            > Subject: [pfaf] Groundnut question
            >
            >
            > > Hi -
            > > My family's property in Maine is being taken over by American
            > > groundnut. I have been reading up on it and realize that it is a
            > > plant that many people try and cultivate as the tubers are edible,
            > > but it is acting like kudzu, climbing up young saplings and pulling
            > > them down and generally creating a canopy over the vegetation
            > > that we originally planted. It seems to spread so quickly that it is
            > > impossible to control it by mere weeding (we are not there
            > > throughout the summer and it grows out of control during our
            > > abscence)
            > > Does anyone have any ideas as to how we could either
            > > eradicate it or control it in as eco-friendly a manner possible?
            > >
            > > Thanks for any help or advice you can give me!
            > >
            > > Ellen Rowe
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
            > ADVERTISEMENT
            > [Image: "click"]
            > [Image: "width=1"]
            >
            > __________________________________________________
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            > ? To visit your group on the web, go to:
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pfaf/
            >
            > ? To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > pfaf-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > ? Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.





            Prof. Ellen Rowe
            Coordinator, Undergraduate Jazz Studies
            University of Michigan
            1100 Baits Rd., Ann Arbor MI 48109-2085
            734-647-6297/elrowe@.../www.ellenrowe.com
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