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don't scratch that itch

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  • travelerinthyme
    If you never scratch a chigger or mosquito bite, it never itches after the first few minutes, because you haven t broken the skin to let in bacteria. I taught
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 2, 2011
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      If you never scratch a chigger or mosquito bite, it never itches after the first few minutes, because you haven't broken the skin to let in bacteria.

      I taught my kids never to scratch, they hardly ever had scabs.

      ~Traveler in Thyme
      Texas, where the bugs roam free!
    • Sheila
      That might be true in the US but I am here to tell you that it doesn t work on UK mozzie bites. Sheila
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 2, 2011
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        That might be true in the US but I am here to tell you that it doesn't work on UK mozzie bites.
        Sheila
        --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "travelerinthyme" <traveler.in.thyme@...> wrote:
        >
        > If you never scratch a chigger or mosquito bite, it never itches after the first few minutes, because you haven't broken the skin to let in bacteria.
        >
        > I taught my kids never to scratch, they hardly ever had scabs.
        >
        > ~Traveler in Thyme
        > Texas, where the bugs roam free!
        >
      • Tom Gibson
        Must have really tiny mosquitos in Texas. Tom ... the first few minutes, because you haven t broken the skin to let in bacteria.
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 3, 2011
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          Must have really tiny mosquitos in Texas.

          Tom
          --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "travelerinthyme" <traveler.in.thyme@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > If you never scratch a chigger or mosquito bite, it never itches after
          the first few minutes, because you haven't broken the skin to let in
          bacteria.
          >
          > I taught my kids never to scratch, they hardly ever had scabs.
          >
          > ~Traveler in Thyme
          > Texas, where the bugs roam free!
          >
        • Francis S
          I agree People could use broad leaf plaintain plantago major a common yard weed throughout the USA , and in many other countries (for even brown recluse spider
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 12 4:52 AM
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            I agree People could use broad leaf plaintain plantago major
            a common yard weed throughout the USA , and in many other countries
            (for even brown recluse spider bites) to draw out the poison)

            out doors you can rub it inbetween your fingers,
            chew it up, and spit out the juice

            I usually freeze it, it makes it put out juice easier
            you can heat it for wounds(infections) also.

            you can make a salve/ (or lotion) with it
            with olive oil , plaintain, and bee's wax

            form a organic homesteading forum [link below]
            accualy it was the recipe garden ,
            but you have to join both if your interested.
            (they also have a trading group)

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/organichomesteadinggardening/

            recipe garden

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/OHGRecipeGarden/

            the whole plant is edible
            Oh, and the seeds are metimucial,
            and plantain ovata is psyllium husks
            used in cleaning out your colon
            (detoxing with bentonite clay found in wine making shops)

            I am interested in native to illinois plantago species seeds

            a few that were native

            Bracted Plantain
            woolly plantain,
            small plantain

            or The latin names

            Plantago aristata
            Plantago patagonica
            Plantago pusilla
            Plantago virginica








            --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "travelerinthyme" <traveler.in.thyme@...> wrote:
            >
            > If you never scratch a chigger or mosquito bite, it never itches after the first few minutes, because you haven't broken the skin to let in bacteria.
            >
            > I taught my kids never to scratch, they hardly ever had scabs.
            >
            > ~Traveler in Thyme
            > Texas, where the bugs roam free!
            >
          • travelerinthyme
            Very interesting info, thank you! A couple of species of plantain usually grow along the paths, but in this terrible drought, even the cactus are dying. My
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 13 5:04 AM
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              Very interesting info, thank you!
              A couple of species of plantain usually grow along the paths, but in this terrible drought, even the cactus are dying.

              My wildflower book says plantain is not native, but a European import. Says the Indians call it "White Man's Footprint."

              ~Traveler in Thyme
              Blanco County, Texas
              zone 8-9 (feels like zone 23)
            • Francis S
              Here is a random link for Texas plantago I think maybe even hitting mosquitoe s while biting may cause it easier too send out the poison, but I haven t
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 13 3:13 PM
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                Here is a random link for Texas plantago
                I think maybe even hitting mosquitoe's while biting
                may cause it easier too send out the poison, but I haven't compared enough.

                One time though while in a( rainy) field of long grass I didn't hit any
                and after being bit every second way over 20 times a scond
                (not uncommon Im a guitar player)
                I didn't have any need (itches) to scratch.

                taking vitamin B 1 garlic can help
                also rubbing mint (catnip) on your skin should work
                (but they will still crawl on you looking for a spot to bite.)
                I never tried making tea , and putting it on your skin,
                but I've read you can use pine needle tea.

                so many other things (aromatic smelling )herbs you can use,
                but i'd have to search for it.

                I quote
                Thirteen species of plantain are recognized in Texas.
                Most are native, cool-season annuals,
                but three species are perennials and two are introduced.

                redseed plantain (Plantago rhodosperma Dcne.)
                Cedar OR Heller plantain (Plantago hellerii Small)
                Hooker plantain

                http://essmextension.tamu.edu/plants/brushandweeds/detail.aspx?plantID=91

                It is always good to have some froze
                just in case someone gets something like athlets foot in the winter
                a strange bite or something else.

                --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "travelerinthyme" <traveler.in.thyme@...> wrote:
                >
                > If you never scratch a chigger or mosquito bite, it never itches after the first few minutes, because you haven't broken the skin to let in bacteria.
                >
                > I taught my kids never to scratch, they hardly ever had scabs.
                >
                > ~Traveler in Thyme
                > Texas, where the bugs roam free!
                >
              • Francis S
                I looked at the USDA very quickly, and found this list of plantago species now I d like to reintroduce some of these species or have them in a garden (red seed
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 13 3:20 PM
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                  I looked at the USDA very quickly, and found this list of plantago species
                  now I'd like to reintroduce some of these species
                  or have them in a garden
                  (red seed plantain is supposed to be in 48 states)

                  http://plants.usda.gov/java/nameSearch

                  http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PLRH



                  --- In pfaf@yahoogroups.com, "Francis S" <manofpeace32@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Here is a random link for Texas plantago
                  > I think maybe even hitting mosquitoe's while biting
                  > may cause it easier too send out the poison, but I haven't compared enough.
                  >
                  > One time though while in a( rainy) field of long grass I didn't hit any
                  > and after being bit every second way over 20 times a scond
                  > (not uncommon Im a guitar player)
                  > I didn't have any need (itches) to scratch.
                  >
                  > taking vitamin B 1 garlic can help
                  > also rubbing mint (catnip) on your skin should work
                  > (but they will still crawl on you looking for a spot to bite.)
                  > I never tried making tea , and putting it on your skin,
                  > but I've read you can use pine needle tea.
                  >
                  > so many other things (aromatic smelling )herbs you can use,
                  > but i'd have to search for it.
                  >
                  > I quote
                  > Thirteen species of plantain are recognized in Texas.
                  > Most are native, cool-season annuals,
                  > but three species are perennials and two are introduced.
                  >
                  > redseed plantain (Plantago rhodosperma Dcne.)
                  > Cedar OR Heller plantain (Plantago hellerii Small)
                  > Hooker plantain
                  >
                  > http://essmextension.tamu.edu/plants/brushandweeds/detail.aspx?plantID=91
                  >
                  > It is always good to have some froze
                  > just in case someone gets something like athlets foot in the winter
                  > a strange bite or something else.
                  >
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